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Dka Effects On Fetus

Diabetic Ketoacidosis During Pregnancy: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Diabetic Ketoacidosis During Pregnancy: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes1,2. DKA is characterized by the triad of hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and increased total ketone body concentration (ketonuria or ketonemia)2. Although DKA is rarely seen in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus (DM), it carries a risk for both mother and fetus and fetal loss may occur despite treatment3. The incidence of DKA is approximately 1-2% in pregnant woman with DM4. DKA most often emerges during the second or third trimester when insulin resistance increases. It is also more common in pregnancies with Type 1 DM compared with pregnancies with Type 2 DM and gestational DM5,6, especially with the use of corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity and β2-agonists for tocolysis7. DKA during pregnancy with DM despite intensive insulin therapy and strict metabolic control may ocur3,4. On the other hand, normoglycemic DKA during pregnancy is truly unusual but can occur with relatively low, or even normal blood glucose levels8,9. A variety of hormonal and physical changes during pregnancy increases the tendency for DKA1,3. The maternal mortality rate in pregnancies with DKA is %5-15 whereas the fetal mortality rate is approximately % 30-901,4,5. Diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy is an emergency that demands prompt and vigorous treatment and modalities of treatment do not differ from the modalities of treatment for non-pregnant women. Continue reading >>

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

US Pharm. 2010;35(9):HS-2-HS-8. Pregnancy is associated with increased levels of emotional and physical stress. Women with preexisting conditions such as hypertension and diabetes require intense prenatal monitoring by health care professionals. Pharmacists in direct contact with patients can play an integral role in identifying signs and symptoms that require immediate care. Two conditions that require emergent treatment in pregnant women are severe preeclampsia and diabetic ketoacidosis. SEVERE PREECLAMPSIA Hypertensive disorders can affect 6% to 8% of women and increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in both the expectant mother and the unborn child.1,2 Hypertension in pregnancy is divided into four categories: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. The focus in this article is on severe preeclampsia, but a brief discussion of preeclampsia is warranted. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome of unknown etiology, is a multiorgan disease process characterized by the development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks' gestation.1,2 See TABLE 1 for diagnostic criteria.1,2 History of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, chronic hypertension, chronic renal disease, elevated body-mass index, age 40 years or older, multiple gestation, nulliparity, preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, and pregestational diabetes mellitus increase a woman's risk of preeclampsia.1 Preeclampsia is classified as mild or severe based on the degree of hypertension, the level of proteinuria, and the presence of symptoms resulting from the involvement of the kidneys, brain, liver, and cardiovascular system. The incidence of severe preeclampsia is 0.9% in the United States.3 Severe preeclampsia is associate Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Abstract Pregnancies complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with increased rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required, because diabetic ketoacidosis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, usually at lower glucose levels, and often progresses more rapidly as compared with nonpregnancy. Morbidity and mortality can be reduced with early detection of precipitating factors (ie, infection, intractable vomiting, inadequate insulin management or inappropriate insulin cessation, β-sympathomimetic use, steroid administration for fetal lung maturation), prompt hospitalization, and targeted therapy with intensive monitoring. A multidisciplinary approach including a maternal-fetal medicine physician, medical endocrinology specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy, an obstetric anesthesiologist, and skilled nursing is paramount. Management principles include aggressive volume replacement, initiation of intravenous insulin therapy, correction of acidosis, correction of electrolyte abnormalities and management of precipitating factors, as well as monitoring of maternal-fetal response to treatment. When diabetic ketoacidosis occurs after 24 weeks of gestation, fetal status should be continuously monitored given associated fetal hypoxemia and acidosis. The decision for delivery can be challenging and must be based on gestational age as well as maternal-fetal responses to therapy. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for nonreassuring fetal status that is frequently present during the acute episode, but it is imperative to correct the maternal metabolic abnormalities first, because both maternal and fetal conditions will likewise improve. Prevention strategies should include education of diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Practice Essentials Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of variable degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. A study by Stuebe et al found this condition to be associated with persistent metabolic dysfunction in women at 3 years after delivery, separate from other clinical risk factors. [1] Infants of mothers with preexisting diabetes mellitus experience double the risk of serious injury at birth, triple the likelihood of cesarean delivery, and quadruple the incidence of newborn intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Gestational diabetes mellitus accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy, while preexisting type 2 diabetes accounts for 8% of such cases. Screening for diabetes mellitus during pregnancy Gestational diabetes The following 2-step screening system for gestational diabetes is currently recommended in the United States: Alternatively, for high-risk women or in areas in which the prevalence of insulin resistance is 5% or higher (eg, the southwestern and southeastern United States), a 1-step approach can be used by proceeding directly to the 100-g, 3-hour OGTT. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus after 24 weeks of pregnancy. The recommendation applies to asymptomatic women with no previous diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. [2, 3] The recommendation does not specify whether the 1-step or 2-step screening approach would be preferable. Type 1 diabetes The disease is typically diagnosed during an episode of hyperglycemia, ketosis, and dehydration It is most commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence; the disease is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy Patients diagnosed during pregnancy most often present with unexpected Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency previously considered typical of type 1 diabetes but now reported also in type 2 and GDM patients. Although it is a fairly rare condition, DKA in pregnancy can compromise both fetus and mother. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy predispose to DKA in fact it can develop even in setting of normoglycemia. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA, in particular euglycemic DKA, and will provide information regarding all possible effects of ketones on the fetus. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

The occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy compromises both the fetus and the mother. It usually occurs in the later stages of pregnancy and is also seen in newly presenting type 1 diabetes patients. Despite improvement in its incidence rates and outcomes over the years, it still remains a major clinical problem since it tends to occur at lower blood glucose levels and more rapidly than in non-pregnant patients often causing delay in the diagnosis. This article illustrates a typical case of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and reviews the literature to provide an insight into its pathophysiology and management. Full Text Selected References These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy ( Ahmed Walid Anwar Morad)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy ( Ahmed Walid Anwar Morad)

1. Management of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy Dr/ Ahmed Walid Anwar Morad Assistant professor of OB/GYN Benha University 2017 2. This talk spotlights on • Definition • Epidemiology • Pathophysiology • Diagnosis • Differential diagnosis • Prevention • Treatment • Pitfalls in DKS 3. Epidemiology • DKA is an acute medical emergency associated with: - Fetal loss rates more than 50%. - Maternal mortality rates less than 1%. 4. Epidemiology • DKA in pregnancy most commonly occurs in women with: - Poorly controlled : *T1DM *T2DM or GDM under - Glucocorticoids - B-agonists / tocolytics - First presentation of T1DM in pregnancy 6. Glucose Homeostasis 7. DKA is common during pregnancy WHY? • Pregnancy is a stat of Relative insulin resistance especially in 2nd & 3rd trimesters. • Increased levels of HPL ,E, P & Cortisol act as insulin antagonists& impair maternal insulin sensitivity. • Pregnancy is a state of respiratory alkalosis associated with a compensatory drop in bicarbonate levels; this impairs the renal buffering capacity. 8. Precipitating factors of DKA in pregnancy • Insufficient or no insulin • Protracted vomiting • Hyperemesis gravidarum • Starvation • Infections • Medications precipitating DKP • Conditions such as diabetic gastroparesis 9. Diagnosis of DKA in pregnancy • DKP may be the first presentatio n of diabetes in pregnancy 10. Laboratory confirmation of DKA in pregnancy 11. Pitfalls in DKA • Potassium level may be falsely normal/elevated. • High – WBC count without infection. – Blood urea with prerenal azotemia due to dehydration. – Creatinine in absence of true impairment of renal function. – Serum amylase even in absence of pancreatitis. 12. What is different in pregnancy? • DKA occurs at lower blo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Poses Fetal Risk During / After Event

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Poses Fetal Risk During / After Event

(HealthDay)—Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during pregnancy poses risk for the fetus during and after the event, according to research published online June 12 in Diabetes Care. Fritha J.R. Morrison, M.P.H., from Tulane University in New Orleans, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study involving pregnancies between 1996 and 2015 with at least one DKA event in women with type 1 diabetes. Data were included for 77 DKA events in 64 pregnancies among 62 women. The researchers found that fetal demise, preterm birth, and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions occurred in 15.6, 46.3, and 59 percent of pregnancies, respectively. In 60 and 40 percent of the cases, fetal demise occurred at the time of or within one week of DKA and between one and 11 weeks after DKA, respectively. The risk of fetal demise was significantly increased with maternal ICU admission and higher serum osmolality during the DKA event. Maternal smoking and higher pre-DKA hemoglobin A1c levels correlated with increased risk of preterm birth. Higher risk of NICU admission was seen with maternal smoking, preeclampsia during pregnancy, higher anion gap during DKA event, and preterm birth. "Further research is needed to identify effective methods for prevention, early recognition, and timely treatment of DKA in pregnancy to mitigate risk of fetal demise and other adverse fetal outcomes," the authors write. More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) Continue reading >>

Successful Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Successful Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

(* Assistant Professor, **Registrar, *** Second Year Resident, **** Additional Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M Hospital, Mumbai, India.) Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complication seen in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) but can also occur in pregnancies complicated by type 2 DM or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). DKA is a medical emergency with high maternal and fetal mortality, and requires treatment in an intensive care setting. Prompt recognition and resuscitative therapy improves medical and obstetric outcomes. This report of DKA in a case of GDM provides insight into pathophysiology and successful management. Normal pregnancy is characterized by a state of decreased insulin sensitivity, accelerated lipolysis and ketogenesis.[1, 2, 3, 4] The concentration of serum ketones is estimated to be two to four times greater than in nonpregnant state.[1, 5] Despite these changes, the incidence of DKA in pregnant diabetics is only 1 to 3%.[2, 3] Fetal mortality rates of 30 to 90% in the past have now decreased to 9% due to improvements in neonatal and diabetic management.[2, 3] A 22 year old primigravida with 34+6 weeks of gestation was referred to our tertiary care center with giddiness, polyuria, polydipsia, candidial vagina discharge and deranged blood sugars (fasting blood glucose 280 mg/dl and post-meal value 410 mg/dl a few days back). She had stable vital signs, 34 weeks’ sized relaxed gravid uterus with cephalic presentation and normal fetal heart sounds. She had been diagnosed by her primary care obstetrician as GDM one month earlier and referred to us; however she did not report nor was she on any treatment. Recent sonography revealed oligohydramnios (amniotic fluid index 7 cm) but no fetal malformations. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Pregestational and Gestational Diabetes throughout the pregnancy Pregestational vs Gestational Diabetes Pregestational diabetes is diabetes that pre exists the pregnancy Gestational diabetes develops or is first discovered during the pregnancy. Changes in glucose metabolism during pregnancy Early in pregnancy there is an increased insulin secretion At the end of the first trimester most women have an increased glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion In the second and third trimesters there is a progressive increase in insulin resistance due to pregnancy hormones from the placenta. How do these changes effect preexisting diabetes? Insulin needs may be decreased in the first trimester due to these changes as well as the nausea and vomiting pregnant women experience. There will be an progressive increased need for insulin during the second and third trimester. Post partum needs will be decreased dramatically Preconception health and diabetes This is a concept in which a mother receives care before she becomes pregnant in order to achieve optimal results for her and her baby. Primary goal in diabetes is a HbA1c of less than 7% at pre conception. To continue on birth control until it is at that level. However, remember that it is recommended that ALL women receive preconception care. Additional preconception testing Pap CBC Serum creatinine Thyroid 24 hour urine Lipid panel Retinal exam Neurological exam Medication usage Insulin regimen Referral to diabetes educator Referral to dietician Maternal Consequences of preexisting diabetes Preeclampsia Bacterial infections Polyhydraminos Birth trauma from macrosomic infants Preterm labor Cesarean delivery Postpartum hemorrhage DKA A word about DKA and pregnancies DKA is seen in 5-10% of pregnancies complicated by diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Type 2 Diabetes article more useful, or one of our other health articles. This article deals with pregnancy in patients with pre-existing diabetes. See also separate Gestational Diabetes article. Epidemiology Diabetes is the most common pre-existing medical disorder complicating pregnancy in the UK. Up to 5% of women giving birth in England and Wales have either pre-existing diabetes or gestational diabetes[1]. The number of people with type 1 diabetes and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes amongst women of child-bearing age are increasing. Pregnancies of women with diabetes are regarded as high-risk for both the woman and the baby[2]. Of women who have diabetes during pregnancy, it is estimated that approximately 87.5% have gestational diabetes, 7.5% have type 1 diabetes and the remaining 5% have type 2 diabetes[1]. Possible complications Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with risks to the woman and to the developing fetus[1]. Miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour are more common in women with pre-existing diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy can worsen rapidly during pregnancy. Stillbirth, congenital malformations, macrosomia, birth injury, perinatal mortality and postnatal adaptation problems (eg, hypoglycaemia) are more common in babies born to women with pre-existing diabetes. Pre-conception care and good glucose control before and during pregnancy can reduce these risks. Increased risk of complications of diabetes Ketoacidosis may occur during the pregnancy. Progression of microvascular complications including retinopathy and nephropathy: poor Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Maternal and fetal outcomes Despite intensified insulin treatment and strict surveillance of metabolic control in diabetic women during pregnancy, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) complicates 2–9% of diabetic pregnancies (1) and represents the leading cause of fetal loss, with a fetal mortality rate of 30–90% (1–3). From August 1991 to December 2001, 2,025 pregnant women with diabetes were admitted to the University of Tennessee Women’s Hospital. Of these, 888 women (44%) received insulin therapy, and 11 women (1.2%) presented with DKA (blood glucose: 377 ± 27 mg/dl, pH: 7.22 ± 0.01, bicarbonate 7.9 ± 3 mEq/l, and positive serum ketones). White’s diabetic classification included class A2, four patients (27%); class B, five patients (45%); class C, one patient (9%); and class D, one patient (9%). The four women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were African-American, had a mean age of 25 ± 1 year, a BMI of 34 ± 3 kg/m2, and an estimated gestational age of 29 ± 1 weeks. Patients with a previous history of diabetes had a mean duration of diabetes of 6 ± 1 year, a mean age of 27 ± 1 year, a BMI of 30 ± 2 kg/m2, and a gestational age of 28 ± 1 weeks. Infection (27%) and a history of the omission of insulin therapy (18%) were the most common precipitating causes. There were no maternal deaths, and the mean maternal length of hospital stay was 7 ± 2 days. Two patients presented with intrauterine fetal demise, and there was one additional fetal death giving an overall fetal death rate of 27%. During labor, four patients had nonreassuring fetal heart rate tracings in the form of late decelerations that resolved with correction of DKA. At birth, the mean (5 min) Apgar was 8.7 ± 0.4, and fetal weight was 1,278 ± 202 g. Four obese women with DKA had newly d Continue reading >>

Normoglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Normoglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

The clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy is usually the same as in nonpregnant women, although the blood glucose may not be as high as in the nongravid state. We report a case of a pregnant woman who developed diabetic ketoacidosis with a normal blood glucose and review the pertinent medical literature. A 29-year-old woman with type I diabetes developed diabetic ketoacidosis during induction of labor. She had a glucose level of 87 mg per 100 ml with ketonuria, a metabolic acidosis, and an anion gap of 20 mmol l−1. Normoglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis during pregnancy is truly unusual but can occur with relatively low, or even normal, blood sugars and necessitates prompt recognition and treatment. In this case, the combination of an initial episode of hypoglycemia and subsequent blood glucose levels below 95 mg per 100 ml led to a prolonged delay in the initiation of a planned insulin infusion for insulin coverage during the induction of labor. A significant ketoacidosis consequently developed, despite the absence of even a single elevated blood glucose measurement. This case illustrated the importance of not withholding insulin in a patient with type I diabetes for more than a few hours even if the blood glucose is normal. Normal pregnancy is characterized by a state of decreased insulin sensitivity, as well as accelerated lipolysis and ketogenesis.1, 2, 3, 4 The concentration of serum ketones has been estimated to be two to four times greater than in the nonpregnant state.1, 5 In addition, pregnant women have a respiratory alkalosis, lowering the serum bicarbonate concentration, thus reducing the capacity to buffer hydrogen ions. Despite these changes, the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in pregnant diabetic women is only 1 to 3%.6, 7 K Continue reading >>

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

We provided appropriate management with fluid infusion after cesarean delivery. The patient and her two daughters survived, and no disabilities were foreseen. Alcohol, methanol, and lactic acid levels were normal. No signs of renal disease or diabetes were present. Pathological examination revealed no abnormalities of the placentae. Toxicological tests revealed a salicylate level of less than 5 mg/liter, an acetaminophen level of less than 1 mg/liter, and an acetone level of 300 mg/liter (reference, 520 mg/liter). We present a case of third term twin pregnancy with high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to (mild) starvation. Starvation, obesity, third term twin pregnancy, and perhaps a gastroenteritis were the ultimate provoking factors. In the light of the erroneous suspicion of sepsis and initial fluid therapy lacking glucose, one wonders whether, under a different fluid regime, cesarean section could have been avoided. Severe ketoacidosis in the pregnant woman is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. It therefore demands early recognition and immediate intervention. A 26-yr-old patient was admitted to our hospital complaining of rapid progressive dyspnea and abdominal discomfort. She was pregnant with dichorial, diamniotic twins for 35 wk and 4 d. Medical history showed that she was heterozygous for hemochromatosis. Two years before, she had given birth to a healthy girl of 3925 g by cesarean section, and 1 yr before, she had had a spontaneous abortion. Her preadmission outpatient surveillance revealed slightly elevated blood pressure varying from 132158 mm Hg systolic and 7995 mm Hg diastolic. Glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were tested at 24 wk and were normal at 4.6 mmol/liter and 5.4% (36 mmol/mol), respectively. Urine analysis at the outpatient obstetri Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Sir, Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening condition in pregnancy,[1] affecting 0.5-3% of diabetic pregnancies.[2] We describe a woman who developed DKA due to insulin pump malfunction. A 35-year-old nulliparous diabetic, usually well-managed with a subcutaneous insulin pump, presented at 33 weeks gestation with malaise, vomiting, Kussmaul breathing and uterine contractions. Vital signs were, blood pressure 140/70 mmHg, heart rate 110 beats/min, respiratory rate 25 breaths/min and temperature 37°C. Laboratory tests were abnormal [Table 1]. The fetal heart trace showed poor variability, with late decelerations. In the intensive care unit, she received intravenous 0.9% normal saline (2 L over 3 h), then plasmalyte solution at 250 ml/h); insulin 10 u/h; and intravenous potassium. Her clinical and metabolic condition improved over 24 h [Table 1] and both contractions and late decelerations resolved. She was later discharged with a new subcutaneous insulin pump and was delivered uneventfully by elective cesarean section at 37 weeks. Pregnancy constitutes a state of insulin resistance, accelerated starvation and respiratory alkalosis with compensatory renal bicarbonate excretion, predisposing to DKA.[2] Increased insulin resistance and/or inadequate insulin[3] may lead to hormonal-induced release of alternative energy substrates,[1] with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, dehydration, loss of electrolytes (osmotic diuresis), ketosis and metabolic acidosis.[2] The physiological response is a self-perpetuating chain of events, involving increased respiratory rate and depth (Kussmaul respiration) and compensatory low serum bicarbonate, producing an abnormal high anion gap[1] [Figures 1 and 2]. Fetal distress follows compromised uteroplacental perfusion (materna Continue reading >>

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