diabetestalk.net

Dka Diagnosis

Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most frequent hyperglycaemic acute diabetic complication. Furthermore it carries a significant risk of death, which can be prevented by early and effective management. All physicians, irrespective of the discipline they are working in and whether in primary, secondary or tertiary care institutions, should be able to recognise DKA early and initiate management immediately. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. furball64801

    Actually my thin 85 lb aunts lived to 88 with being diabetic. Yes you can but I never knew what it ran, my mom also very thin and it was cancer that killed her she never ingested anything harmful unless ice tea is in that. I do get your thinking but its your life your numbers, to me its about preventing damage I am 68 as of last month, I dodged a lot of bullets and for me being in control is important got to see all the grand kids graduate and get marries then see great grand kits oh my I am getting old.

  2. jwags

    A non diabetic will usually have numbers under 100 most of the day. I have tested my nonndiabetic family members and they are always under 100 even after eating. As diabetic's we are asked to keep our bgs between 100-140 which is not easy for a lot of us. It is said that blood vessel damage starts when bgs go above 140.

  3. sangdoux

    At this point, I don't think it really matters if stress was a proximate cause of your autoimmune diabetes. Whatever initiated the process, nothing that I know of is going to reverse it. My speculation is that my autoimmune response went haywire after I had a bout with the flu. If that's the case, I didn't develop obvious symptoms until several years later. Once the process started, I don't I could have done anything to change the outcome, certainly not after I showed up at a GP's office with BG of 425, A1c of 11.2, and various obvious indications of blood sugar out of control. I was misdiagnosed as Type 2 (I was 60 years old). I started on Lantus a week after diagnosis and managed OK for 5 years. Once I was on Lantus, my BG stayed under 200 and, as I recall, my next A1c was under 6.5. It took me a few weeks to feel "normal" when my BG was, in fact, "normal," and I had some pain and numbness in my lower extremities (probably from nerve damage) that eventually went away.
    After five years, when I began to lose control with once daily shots of Lantus, I finally got a GAD-65 autoantibody test to prove to my GP that I was Type 1 (LADA). I was referred to an endo, who added MDI Humalog.
    In any event, if you are a LADA, you are going to have to use insulin. If your BG regularly stays above 200, you're much more likely to develop complications than if you have decent control. For some excellent advice on managing diabetes with insulin, check out Gary Scheiner's book "Think Like a Pancreas."

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

http://usmlefasttrack.com/?p=5413 Most, Common:, Hepatocellular, Carcinoma,, Hereditary, bleeding, disorder,, Hereditary, harmless, jaundice,, HLA-B27, &, HLA-DR3, or, DR4, Findings, symptoms, findings, causes, mnemonics, review, what is, video, study, Rapid Review, Clinical presenation, First Aid, for, USMLE, Step 1, images, wiki, define, wikipedia, 2013, videos, exam, prep, easy, What is usmle, mnemonic, causes,

Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Diagnosis: Role Of Family History And Class Ii Hla Genotypes

Abstract Objective: To explore the relationship between family history of diabetes and frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at diagnosis and to analyze the possible association between HLA genotypes and DKA. Design and methods: We recruited 510 children and adolescents aged Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. amsmith

    I understand that the guidelines state "uncontrolled" should be coded as hyperglycemia. What about the DKA type 2 portion? We have 2 opinions in our office and I am just looking for the correct way to code it.
    I suspect for my scenario E11.65, E11.69 and E87.2. Please help.
    There really should be an E11.1X...LOL!!
    Thank you,
    Anna

  2. mitchellde

    Ketoacidosis is actually rare in a type 2 diabetic so that may be the reason for no specific code for it. So use the E11.69 with the E87.2

  3. amsmith

    Oddly, our physician's document it frequently. I will check with one of them to find out why we tend to have a higher volume.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the sp

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Val Wilson describes how emergency nurses should diagnose and treat the effects of severe insulin deficiency in people with type 1 diabetes Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute and serious metabolic complication of type 1 diabetes. Caused by severe insulin deficiency leading to hyperglycaemia, DKA is the most common cause of mortality in people with type 1 diabetes under the age of 40. It causes nausea and vomiting, hypothermia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, tachycardia, deep and rapid breathing and, if untreated, can lead to cerebral oedema, coma and death. The survival of patients with DKA can depend, therefore, on the ability of emergency nurses to recognise its signs and symptoms. The most urgent treatment outcomes in emergency settings are the reversal of ketosis and hyperglycaemia, and the prevention of hypokalaemia and hyponatraemia, and these should be followed by hourly biochemical tests to determine treatment alterations. This article describes DKA and how patients with the condition usually present, and outlines its treatment by emergency nurses. Correspondence [email protected] Published in print on 08 November 2012 Peer review This article has been subject to d Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. furball64801

    Actually my thin 85 lb aunts lived to 88 with being diabetic. Yes you can but I never knew what it ran, my mom also very thin and it was cancer that killed her she never ingested anything harmful unless ice tea is in that. I do get your thinking but its your life your numbers, to me its about preventing damage I am 68 as of last month, I dodged a lot of bullets and for me being in control is important got to see all the grand kids graduate and get marries then see great grand kits oh my I am getting old.

  2. jwags

    A non diabetic will usually have numbers under 100 most of the day. I have tested my nonndiabetic family members and they are always under 100 even after eating. As diabetic's we are asked to keep our bgs between 100-140 which is not easy for a lot of us. It is said that blood vessel damage starts when bgs go above 140.

  3. sangdoux

    At this point, I don't think it really matters if stress was a proximate cause of your autoimmune diabetes. Whatever initiated the process, nothing that I know of is going to reverse it. My speculation is that my autoimmune response went haywire after I had a bout with the flu. If that's the case, I didn't develop obvious symptoms until several years later. Once the process started, I don't I could have done anything to change the outcome, certainly not after I showed up at a GP's office with BG of 425, A1c of 11.2, and various obvious indications of blood sugar out of control. I was misdiagnosed as Type 2 (I was 60 years old). I started on Lantus a week after diagnosis and managed OK for 5 years. Once I was on Lantus, my BG stayed under 200 and, as I recall, my next A1c was under 6.5. It took me a few weeks to feel "normal" when my BG was, in fact, "normal," and I had some pain and numbness in my lower extremities (probably from nerve damage) that eventually went away.
    After five years, when I began to lose control with once daily shots of Lantus, I finally got a GAD-65 autoantibody test to prove to my GP that I was Type 1 (LADA). I was referred to an endo, who added MDI Humalog.
    In any event, if you are a LADA, you are going to have to use insulin. If your BG regularly stays above 200, you're much more likely to develop complications than if you have decent control. For some excellent advice on managing diabetes with insulin, check out Gary Scheiner's book "Think Like a Pancreas."

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Diagnosis Of Diabetes Type 2

    NYU Langone doctors are experts at identifying people with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which a person has chronically high levels of blood sugar. It occurs when the body lacks or is resistant to insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose, or sugar. As a result, the body is unable to convert glucose into energy. In prediabetes, a person has higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes ...

    diabetes Apr 5, 2018
  • Dka Diagnosis

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most frequent hyperglycaemic acute diabetic complication. Furthermore it carries a significant risk of death, which can be prevented by early and effective management. All physicians, irrespective of the discipline they are working in and whether in primary, secondary or tertiary care institutions, should be able to recognise DKA early and initiate management immediately. ...

    ketosis Mar 28, 2018
  • Diabetes Diagnosis A1c

    You may have heard of a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1c, sometimes called HgbA1c, HbA1c, or just A1C. What is an A1C test, and what should you know about it? HgbA1c is hemoglobin (pronounced HE-mo-glow-bin) that has sugar attached to it. Hemoglobin is the protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to all the cells of the body. Hemoglobin is an important component of red blood cells (RBCs). Nearly all cells in the human body need oxygen to p ...

    diabetes Apr 11, 2018
  • Dka Diagnosis Criteria

    Introduction Recently there have been numerous publications and discussions about whether VBGs can replace ABGs in DKA. The growing consensus is that VBGs are indeed adequate. Eliminating painful, time-consuming arterial blood draws is a huge step in the right direction. However, the ABG vs. VBG debate overlooks a larger point: neither ABG nor VBG measurements are usually helpful. It is widely recommended to routinely obtain an ABG or VBG, for ex ...

    ketosis Apr 5, 2018
  • Dka Diagnosis Criteria Uk

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are life-threatening complications of diabetes. UK and USA guidelines for treating diabetic emergencies have some important differences and further research is needed to define the best approach. Diabetes is a common and important medical condition in which the body either cannot produce or becomes insensitive to the hormone insulin. There are two main types of diabetes – Ty ...

    ketosis Apr 5, 2018
  • What Is Dka Diagnosis?

    Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process ...

    ketosis Jan 5, 2018

Popular Articles

More in ketosis