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Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State In Adults: Clinical Features, Evaluation, And Diagnosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State In Adults: Clinical Features, Evaluation, And Diagnosis

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS, also known as hyperosmotic hyperglycemic nonketotic state [HHNK]) are two of the most serious acute complications of diabetes. DKA is characterized by ketoacidosis and hyperglycemia, while HHS usually has more severe hyperglycemia but no ketoacidosis (table 1). Each represents an extreme in the spectrum of hyperglycemia. The precipitating factors, clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis of DKA and HHS in adults will be reviewed here. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of these disorders are discussed separately. DKA in children is also reviewed separately. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis".) Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (though rare, it can occur in people with type 2 diabetes) that occurs when the body produces high levels of ketones due to lack of insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include Risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis are type 1 diabetes, and missing insulin doses frequently, or being exposed to a stressor requiring higher insulin doses (infection, etc). Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar (glucose) level, elevated blood ketones and acidity of the blood (acidosis). The treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin, fluids and electrolyte therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be prevented by taking insulin as prescribed and monitoring glucose and ketone levels. The prognosis for a person with diabetic ketoacidosis depends on the severity of the disease and the other underlying medical conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the cells in our body do not receive the sugar (glucose) they need for energy. This happens while there is plenty of glucose in the bloodstream, but not enough insulin to help convert glucose for use in the cells. The body recognizes this and starts breaking down muscle and fat for energy. This breakdown produces ketones (also called fatty acids), which cause an imbalance in our electrolyte system leading to the ketoacidosis (a metabolic acidosis). The sugar that cannot be used because of the lack of insulin stays in the bloodstream (rather than going into the cell and provide energy). The kidneys filter some of the glucose (suga Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) Explained Clearly

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) Explained Clearly

Understand Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) diagnosis and treatment with this high yield medical course by Dr. Seheult. We're glad you're here! You may have noticed that the videos in this medical course are also available at our MedCram YouTube channel... but stick around because all new MedCram medical videos will be available first here at MedCram.com (and publicly posted to YouTube later... if at all). Also, a growing amount of MedCram content (medical videos, quizzes, medical review notes, and audio lectures) is only available here at MedCram.com - and not available on YouTube. We've got you covered! MedCram medical videos allow you to cut down on study time and maximize retention and understanding by focusing in on what is most important. Dr. Seheult's medical Illustrations, charts, memory aids, and quizzes will make learning and reviewing medical topics a breeze. We think (and certainly hope) you'll find Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Explained Clearly very informative, easy to follow, and fun. See all 47 reviews Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies — Ketoacidosis, Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State And Hypoglycaemia

Diabetic Emergencies — Ketoacidosis, Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State And Hypoglycaemia

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) and hypoglycaemia are serious complications of diabetes mellitus that require prompt recognition, diagnosis and treatment. DKA and HHS are characterized by insulinopaenia and severe hyperglycaemia; clinically, these two conditions differ only by the degree of dehydration and the severity of metabolic acidosis. The overall mortality recorded among children and adults with DKA is <1%. Mortality among patients with HHS is ∼10-fold higher than that associated with DKA. The prognosis and outcome of patients with DKA or HHS are determined by the severity of dehydration, the presence of comorbidities and age >60 years. The estimated annual cost of hospital treatment for patients experiencing hyperglycaemic crises in the USA exceeds US$2 billion. Hypoglycaemia is a frequent and serious adverse effect of antidiabetic therapy that is associated with both immediate and delayed adverse clinical outcomes, as well as increased economic costs. Inpatients who develop hypoglycaemia are likely to experience a long duration of hospital stay and increased mortality. This Review describes the clinical presentation, precipitating causes, diagnosis and acute management of these diabetic emergencies, including a discussion of practical strategies for their prevention. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Diagnosis And Management.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Diagnosis And Management.

Abstract The objective of this manuscript is to review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis, one of the most common acute complications of diabetes mellitus. We performed a medline search of the English-language literature using a combination of words (diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemic crises) to identify original studies, consensus statements and reviews on diabetic ketoacidosis published in the past 15 years. Emphasis was placed on clinical manifestations of diabetic ketoacidosis, its diagnosis and treatment.Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute complication of diabetes mellitus that can be life-threatening if not treated properly. Once thought to occur only in patients with type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis has also been observed in patients with type 2 diabetes under certain conditions. The basic underlying mechanism for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin deficiency coupled with elevated levels of counterregulatory hormones, such as glucagon, cortisol, catecholamines, and growth hormone. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus or precipitated in known patients with diabetes mellitus by many factors, most commonly infection. The management of diabetic ketoacidosis involves careful clinical evaluation, correction of metabolic abnormalities, identification and treatment of precipitating and co-morbid conditions, appropriate long-term treatment of diabetes, and plans to prevent recurrence. Many cases of DKA can be prevented by better access to medical care, proper education, and effective communication with a health care provider during intercurrent illness. Provision of guidelines will also reduce mortality. Resources need to be redirected towards prevention by funding better access to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Diagnosis

Prevalence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Diagnosis

A recent analysis of youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes shows that the incidence of DKA continues to be high…. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by the build-up of ketone bodies secondary to insulin deficiency. While it occurs predominantly in type 1 diabetic patients, at the time of diagnosis, it can also happen in type 2 diabetes when medications are inadequately managed. Using data from the registry component of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, researchers estimated temporal changes in the prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Researchers assessed the trend in the prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis over 3 time period by calculating the period prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis with 95% confidence intervals based on age group, gender and ethnicity/race. Logistic regression was used to analyze factors associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. A total of 5,615 youth with type 1 diabetes and 1,425 with type 2 diabetes were included in the analysis. Diabetic ketoacidosis was defined as a bicarbonate level of less than15 mmol/L and/or a venous pH of less than 7.25 or an arterial or capillary pH of less than 7.30. The prevalence of DKA type 1 diabetic youth was stable having a P-trend=0.42 (CI=95%) with prevalence of 30.2%, 29.1% and 31.1% during the years 2002-2003, 2004-2005 and 2008-2010, respectively). Prevalence was notably higher in those diagnosed at a younger age (P<0.0001), with the overall prevalence being highest in those between the ages of 0 and 4 (~39%) and lowest in those between the ages of 15 and 19 years old (~23%). Researchers found the prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis to be higher in those of minority race (P=0.019) Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

High Frequency Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

High Frequency Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Copyright © 2016 Agnieszka Szypowska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in 2006-2007 and 2013-2014. Method. The study group consisted of 426 children aged 0–18 years with type 1 diabetes onset admitted to our hospital in 2006-2007 (group A) and 2013-2014 (group B). The study comprised the analysis of medical and laboratory records from patients’ medical charts and the electronic database. Results. There was no difference between groups A and B in the percentage of children admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis (25% versus 28%, resp., ). Among children with diabetic ketoacidosis, severe metabolic decompensation (pH < 7.1) appeared in similar frequency in groups A and B (28% versus 30%, resp., ). In group B, children with diabetic ketoacidosis were statistically younger compared to patients without ketoacidosis and had higher HbA1c levels . In both groups, a 2-fold increase in diabetic ketoacidosis was noted in children under the age of 3, compared to overall frequency. Conclusion. No decrease in diabetic ketoacidosis has been noted in the recent years. Although the prevalence and severity of diabetic ketoacidosis remain stable, they are unacceptably high. The youngest children are especially prone to ketoacidosis. 1. Introduction The incidence rate of type 1 diabetes has increased worldwide, with the greatest rise in annual incidence among children under the age of five. The overall incidence rate in the region of Silesia in Poland Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (peds)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (peds)

DKA + altered mental status = cerebral edema until proven otherwise May be the initial presenting of an unrecognized Type-1 diabetes mellitus patient Presenting signs/symptoms include altered mental status, tachypnea, abdominal pain Perform a thorough neurologic exam (cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children) Assess for possible inciting cause (esp for ongoing infection; see Differential Diagnosis section) Keep in mind that the initial presentation of sepsis with dehydration can look very similar to DKA Drowsiness Tachypnea (Kussmaul's breathing) Signs of dehydration Perform a thorough neurologic exam as cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children There may be signs from underlying cause (eg pneumonia) Differential Diagnosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HONC) Evaluation Point of care glucose (and potassium, if available) CBC Chem 7 Magnesium Phosphorus Serum ketones (or beta-OH and acetone) Urine pregnancy (if appropriate) VBG Consider studies for possible infectious trigger If K+<5.5 Insulin drip 0.1 units/kg/hr Do not start if K+ <4.0 (repleate K+ first) Cont until HCO3 >15 and pH >7.3, then initiate SC insulin Decrease infusion to 0.05 units/kg/hr until 1hr after SC insulin initiated if < 2.5, hold insulin and give 1 meq/kg KCL in IV over 1hr No insulin until K > 2.5 if > 2.5 but < 3.5 give 40-60 meq/L in IV until K > 3.5 if > 3.5 but < 5.5 give 30-40 meq/L in IV for K=3.5 - 5 if > 5.5, then check K q1hr No evidence supports the use of sodium bicarb in DKA, with a pH >6.9 However, no studies have been performed for patients with pH <6.9 and the most recent ADA guidelines recommend it for patients with pH <7.1 Only consider for: Critically ill (hemodynamic compromise from dec Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Management Of Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Diagnosis And Management Of Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Download Slide Library Key Points DKA and HHS are life-threatening emergencies. Management involves Attention to precipitating cause Fluid and electrolyte management Insulin therapy Patient monitoring Prevention of metabolic complications during recovery Transition to long-term therapy Patient education and discharge planning should aim at prevention of recurrence. Suggested Reading Burghen GA, Etteldorf JN, Fisher JN, Kitabchi AQ. Comparison of high-dose and low-dose insulin by continuous intravenous infusion in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis in children. Diabetes Care. 1980;3:15-20. Devi R, Selvakumar G, Clark L, Downer C, Braithwaite SS. A dose-defining insulin algorithm for attainment and maintenance of glycemic targets during therapy of hyperglycemic crises. Diabetes Manage. 2011;1:397-412. Glaser N, Barnett P, McCaslin I, et al. Risk factors for cerebral edema in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. The Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics. N Engl J Med. 2001;344:264-269. Mudaliar S, Mohideen P, Deutsch R, et al. Intravenous glargine and regular insulin have similar effects on endogenous glucose output and peripheral activation/deactivation kinetic profiles. Diabetes Care. 2002;25:1597-1602. Muir AB, Quisling RG, Yang MC, Rosenbloom AL. Cerebral edema in childhood diabetic ketoacidosis: natural history, radiographic findings, and early identification. Diabetes Care. 2004;27:1541-1546. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Type 1 Diabetes Results In Poor Disease Control

Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Type 1 Diabetes Results In Poor Disease Control

Children diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis and type 1 diabetes may have higher HbA1C levels. Findings from a new study published by Diabetes Care suggests that pediatric patients who are diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the time of type 1 diabetes diagnosis may have an increased risk of poor disease control. Included in the study were 3364 children living in Colorado who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 1998 and 2012. At baseline, 39% (1297) patients had DKA at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The authors found that ethnicity and health insurance status were linked to presenting DKA at diagnosis. Additionally, they discovered that these patients had higher HbA1C levels over a 15-year follow-up period, according to the study. After accounting for age, ethnicity, family history of diabetes, insurance status, and insulin pump use, 40% of patients with a dual diagnosis had poor blood glucose control. Compared with children without DKA, HbA1c was 1.4% higher among patients with severe DKA and 0.9% higher among patients presenting mild or moderate DKA at diagnosis, according to the study. The authors concluded that worsening of beta cell death that results from hyperglycemia and inflammation related to DKA may worsen blood glucose control, according to the study. They also noted that DKA can have an effect on cognitive function, which may be a factor in decreased self-care. "I think people do not realize the long-term implications of DKA. We've shown it persists for at least 15 years," study co-author Arleta Rewers, MD, told Medscape Medical News. “This is how long we had data, but I'm pretty sure the effect lasts even beyond 15 years.” These results highlight the need to recognize the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes and immediately begin tre Continue reading >>

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis In A Newly Diagnosed Child With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis In A Newly Diagnosed Child With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Abdulmoein E Al-Agha1* and Mohammed A Al-Agha2 1Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia 2Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia Citation: Abdulmoein E Al-Agha1, Mohammed A Al-Agha (2017) Severe Diabetic ketoacidosis in a Newly Diagnosed Child with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report. J Diabetes Metab 8:724. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000724 Copyright: © 2017 Al-Agha AE, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Background: Diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). DKA is characterized by the presence of hyperglycemia, ketosis, ketonuria, and metabolic acidosis. Cerebral edema is a rare but rather a serious complication of DKA. Case presentation: An obese 12-year-old, Egyptian boy, previously medically free, presented to the emergency room (ER) of King Abdulaziz university hospital, with two weeks' histories of dizziness, shortness of breath, polyuria, polydipsia & nocturia. His symptoms were deteriorating with a change in sensorial and cognitive functions at the time of presentation. He was diagnosed with type 2 DM based upon clinical background, namely the presence of obesity (weight+7.57 Standard Deviation Score (SDS), height+1.4 SDS, and body mass index (BMI) of 34.77 kg/m2 (+3.97SDS) together with the presence of Acanthosis nigricans and biochemically based on, normal level of serum insulin, normal serum level of connecting peptide and negative autoantibodies. H Continue reading >>

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