diabetestalk.net

Dka Causing Aki

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Increases Risk Of Acute Renal Failure In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Increases Risk Of Acute Renal Failure In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Condition often under-recognized, yet preventable and treatable. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a syndrome presenting in people with diabetes when insulin utilization is markedly diminished, whether via sudden increases in insulin requirements (most often due to acute illness) or sharp decreases in exogenous insulin administration (sudden cessation, for example). DKA is manifested as severe hyperglycemia, systemic acidosis, and severe dehydration due to rapidly increasing osmotic diuresis. This condition is especially worrisome in the pediatric diabetic population, as the resulting risk of renal injury often goes unrecognized at presentation. In 2014, the results of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study suggested that approximately 30% of pediatric (<18 y.o.) type 1 diabetes patients presented with DKA at initial diagnosis. Other studies have looked at the treatment of DKA in the pediatric population, and its effects on morbidity and mortality, but until now, none have attempted to correlate DKA and acute renal failure. The current issue of JAMA Pediatric presents a study looking at the incidence of acute kidney injury in pediatric patients hospitalized for DKA and attempts to show a correlation between the two events. This retrospective review collected data on pediatric T1D patients admitted to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital with DKA between September 2008 and December 2013. Patients with the above mentioned conditions and complete medical records during that period were included. The primary objective was to determine the proportion of eligible subjects who developed acute kidney injury (AKI). During the prescribed time frame, 211 children were hospitalized at BCCH with DKA. Of these, 165 admissions met criteria for the study. Demographically, 53.9% were Continue reading >>

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1 King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada, Canada 2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada Click here for correspondence address and email Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Early recognition and aggressive treatment of ARF during DKA may improve the prognosis of these patients. We present a case report of a 12 year old female admitted to the hospital with severe DKA as the 1s t manifestation of her diabetes mellitus. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, and oliguric ARF. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was noted during the course of DKA which probably contributed to the ARF. Management of DKA and renal replacement therapy resulted in quick recovery of renal function. We suggest that early initiation of renal replacement therapy for patients with DKA developing ARF may improve the potentially poor outcome of patients with ARF associated with DKA. How to cite this article: Al-Matrafi J, Vethamuthu J, Feber J. Severe acute renal failure in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2009;20:831-4 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs in 10 to 70% of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and has a significant risk of mortality, mostly due to cerebral edema. [1] Other potential complications of DKA include hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hypoglycemia, intracerebral and peripheral venous thrombosis, mucormycosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure (ARF) and sepsis. The development of ARF with rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal diso Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and young adults carries significant morbidity and mortality relating to complications such as cerebral oedema. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of DKA. We present three cases of DKA complicated by AKI. Case 1: A 9-year-old girl presented with severe DKA at diagnosis. She was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin as per protocol. She had oliguria and haematuria 36 h after admission. She was hypertensive with evidence of enlarged kidneys on ultrasound (USS). She was transferred to the renal unit where she needed two cycles of hemodialysis before making full recovery. Case 2: A 14-year-old girl presented with severe DKA and altered consciousness at diagnosis. She developed oliguria 24 h after starting treatment for DKA. USS of abdomen showed enlarged kidneys. Her renal function improved with haemofiltration and recovered fully by 1 week. Case 3: 17-year-old girl with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes presented with severe DKA. She showed evidence of AKI with very high plasma creatinine, oliguria and low plasma phosphate. She was managed conservatively with individualised fluid plan and phosphate supplementation with recovery in 7 days. Conclusion: Patients with severe DKA can develop AKI due to a number of possible causes, hypovolaemia being the most likely primary cause. Appropriate management of hypovolemia and electrolyte disturbance in these patients can be very challenging. These cases highlight the importance of early recognition of AKI (rising plasma creatinine, oliguria, haematuria) and discussion with paediatric nephrologist to formulate individualised fluid therapy in order to prevent deterioration in renal function. It is uncertain if recent modification in fluid man Continue reading >>

Overview Of The Management Of Acute Kidney Injury In Adults

Overview Of The Management Of Acute Kidney Injury In Adults

INTRODUCTION Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an abrupt and usually reversible decline in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This results in an elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and other metabolic waste products that are normally excreted by the kidney. The term AKI, rather than acute renal failure (ARF), is increasingly used by the nephrology community to refer to the acute loss of kidney function. This term also highlights that injury to the kidney that does not result in "failure" is also of great clinical significance. In this topic review, the acute loss of kidney function will be referred to as AKI. The initial assessment of patients with AKI and management of the major complications of AKI are discussed here. The incidence, causes, diagnosis, and prevention of AKI are presented separately. (See "Diagnostic approach to adult patients with subacute kidney injury in an outpatient setting" and "Kidney and patient outcomes after acute kidney injury in adults" and "Possible prevention and therapy of ischemic acute tubular necrosis".) PATHOGENESIS AKI has multiple possible etiologies. Among hospitalized patients, AKI is most commonly due to either prerenal etiologies (volume depletion, "third spacing," effective volume depletion from heart failure or cirrhosis) or acute tubular necrosis (ATN) from ischemia, nephrotoxin exposure, or sepsis [1]. The pathogenesis of ATN is discussed elsewhere. (See "Pathogenesis and etiology of ischemic acute tubular necrosis" and "Pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of contrast-induced nephropathy".) Other frequent causes of AKI among either ambulatory or hospitalized patients include volume depletion, urinary obstruction, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, and acute interstitial nephritis. The path Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury: A Guide To Diagnosis And Management

Acute Kidney Injury: A Guide To Diagnosis And Management

Acute kidney injury is characterized by abrupt deterioration in kidney function, manifested by an increase in serum creatinine level with or without reduced urine output. The spectrum of injury ranges from mild to advanced, sometimes requiring renal replacement therapy. The diagnostic evaluation can be used to classify acute kidney injury as prerenal, intrinsic renal, or postrenal. The initial workup includes a patient history to identify the use of nephrotoxic medications or systemic illnesses that might cause poor renal perfusion or directly impair renal function. Physical examination should assess intravascular volume status and identify skin rashes indicative of systemic illness. The initial laboratory evaluation should include measurement of serum creatinine level, complete blood count, urinalysis, and fractional excretion of sodium. Ultrasonography of the kidneys should be performed in most patients, particularly in older men, to rule out obstruction. Management of acute kidney injury involves fluid resuscitation, avoidance of nephrotoxic medications and contrast media exposure, and correction of electrolyte imbalances. Renal replacement therapy (dialysis) is indicated for refractory hyperkalemia; volume overload; intractable acidosis; uremic encephalopathy, pericarditis, or pleuritis; and removal of certain toxins. Recognition of risk factors (e.g., older age, sepsis, hypovolemia/shock, cardiac surgery, infusion of contrast agents, diabetes mellitus, preexisting chronic kidney disease, cardiac failure, liver failure) is important. Team-based approaches for prevention, early diagnosis, and aggressive management are critical for improving outcomes. The incidence of acute kidney injury has increased in recent years, both in the community and in hospital settings.1,2 Continue reading >>

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Introduction The incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide affecting both types of the disease. The most frequent acute diabetic complications are hyperglycemic crises, namely diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Diabetic ketoacidosis results from an absolute insulin deficiency. Classical presentation associates a triad of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and high ketone bodies concentration. Similarly to diabetes, the incidence of DKA increases over time [1], [2]. This may be a life-threatening condition due to severe clinical and biological impairments and treatment associated complications (cerebral edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypokalaemia, hypophosphatemia). However, mortality is low and most of the time, death is related to the precipitating factor [3]–[6]. For this reason, admission of these patients in ICU is still debated. A grading system for severity of DKA was described previously [7]. Patients presenting the most severe grades or common severity criteria were considered for ICU admission. However this grading system is not recommended for clinical practice, resulting in wide variations in ICU utilisation for DKA, depending on the national practices, the number of DKA admitted in the units and the severity of the clinical status [8]. Interestingly, in the absence of randomised trials, there are no data showing any impact of the level of care on DKA mortality. To help clinicians, guidelines for DKA management are published and updated by the American Diabetic Association [6]. Their effect on clinical outcome is unclear as compliance to guidelines is poor in diabetes care and ICU [9], [10]. However, implementation of a local mandatory protocol seems more efficient to decrease ICU a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

A new Journal of American Medical Association article has shown that there is a high rate of occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in children hospitalized with a diagnosis diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Acute kidney injury is one of the most common causes of renal injury that can arise from several aetiologies. Based on predisposing factors, the causes may be categorized into 3 classes: pre-renal, renal or post-renal. In cases of volume depletion, like that which occurs in diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication of diabetes where there is high ketone production), perfusion to kidneys is impaired and that is when the kidneys start to lose their functioning. Since acute kidney injury in children is associated with a poor short term and long term outcome, in a new JAMA article, and for the first time, researchers have evaluated the rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for the diabetic ketoacidosis. This study was conducted at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital from 2008 through 2013. 165 children aged 18 years or younger with type 1 diabetes, DKA and with complete medical records available for data analysis were included. The primary outcome was the development of acute kidney injury defined using Kidney Disease/Improving Global Outcomes serum creatinine criteria. As per findings, in the designed timeframe, of the 165 children hospitalized for DKA, 106 (64.2%) developed AKI.Two children required hemodialysis. Statistical analysis has shown that a serum bicarbonate level of less than 10 mEq/L was associated with a 5-fold increased risk of developing severe kidney injury. This means that the incidence of acute kidney injury is directly associated with the severity of the acidosis resulting from DKA. Increase in heart rate (demo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury Differential Diagnoses

Acute Kidney Injury Differential Diagnoses

Diagnostic Considerations Although acute kidney injury (AKI) is a potentially reversible condition, it can occur in patients with chronic renal failure. Every effort should be made to identify reversibility, even if improvement in renal function is marginal. The best way to identify reversibility is by tracking the rate of deterioration of renal function. If there is an acceleration of the rate at which the patient’s renal function is worsening, the cause should be sought and treated. Differentials to consider in AKI include the following: Urine output in differential diagnosis Changes in urine output generally correlate poorly with changes in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Approximately 50-60% of all causes of AKI are nonoliguric. However, the identification of anuria, oliguria, and nonoliguria may be useful in the differential diagnosis of AKI, as follows: Anuria (< 100 mL/day) - Urinary tract obstruction, renal artery obstruction, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, bilateral diffuse renal cortical necrosis Nonoliguria (>400 mL/day) - Acute interstitial nephritis, acute glomerulonephritis, partial obstructive nephropathy, nephrotoxic and ischemic ATN, radiocontrast-induced AKI, and rhabdomyolysis Differential Diagnoses Workup Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

More in ketosis