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Dka Anion Gap Range

Abg Interpretation

Abg Interpretation

Arterial blood gas (ABG) interpretation is something many medical students find difficult to grasp (we’ve been there). We’ve created this guide, which aims to provide a structured approach to ABG interpretation whilst also increasing your understanding of each results relevance. The real value of an ABG comes from its ability to provide a near immediate reflection of the physiology of your patient, allowing you to recognise and treat pathology more rapidly. To see how to perform an arterial blood gas check out our guide here. If you want to put your ABG interpretation skills to the test, check out our ABG quiz here. Normal ranges pH: 7.35 – 7.45 PaCO2: 4.7-6.0 kPa PaO2: 11-13 kPa HCO3-: 22-26 mEg/L Base excess: -2 to +2 mmol/L Patient’s clinical condition Before getting stuck into the details of the analysis, it’s important to look at the patient’s current clinical status, as this provides essential context to the ABG result. Below are a few examples to demonstrate how important context is when interpreting an ABG. A normal PaO2 in a patient on high flow oxygen – this is abnormal as you would expect the patient to have a PaO2 well above the normal range with this level of oxygen therapy A normal PaCO2 in a hypoxic asthmatic patient – a sign they are tiring and need ITU intervention A very low PaO2 in a patient who looks completely well, is not short of breath and has normal O2 saturations – likely a venous sample Oxygenation (PaO2) Your first question when looking at the ABG should be “Is this patient hypoxic?” (because this will kill them long before anything else does). PaO2 should be >10 kPa on air in a healthy patient If the patient is receiving oxygen therapy their PaO2 should be approximately 10kPa less than the % inspired concentration / FiO Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

OVERVIEW Anion Gap = Na+ – (Cl- + HCO3-) The Anion Gap (AG) is a derived variable primarily used for the evaluation of metabolic acidosis to determine the presence of unmeasured anions The normal anion gap depends on serum phosphate and serum albumin concentrations An elevated anion gap strongly suggests the presence of a metabolic acidosis The normal anion gap varies with different assays, but is typically 4 to 12mmol/L (if measured by ion selective electrode; 8 to 16 if measured by older technique of flame photometry) If AG > 30 mmol/L then metabolic acidosis invariably present If AG 20-29mmol/L then 1/3 will not have a metabolic acidosis K can be added to Na+, but in practice offers little advantage ALBUMIN AND PHOSPHATE the normal anion gap depends on serum phosphate and serum albumin the normal AG = 0.2 x [albumin] (g/L) + 1.5 x [phosphate] (mmol/L) albumin is the major unmeasured anion and contributes almost the whole of the value of the anion gap. every 1g/L decrease in albumin will decrease anion gap by 0.25 mmoles a normally high anion gap acidosis in a patient with hypoalbuminaemia may appear as a normal anion gap acidosis. this is particularly relevant in ICU patients where lower albumin levels are common HIGH ANION GAP METABOLIC ACIDOSIS (HAGMA) HAGMA results from accumulation of organic acids or impaired H+ excretion Causes (LTKR) Lactate Toxins Ketones Renal Causes (CATMUDPILES) CO, CN Alcoholic ketoacidosis and starvation ketoacidosis Toluene Metformin, Methanol Uremia DKA Pyroglutamic acidosis, paracetamol, phenformin, propylene glycol, paraladehyde Iron, Isoniazid Lactic acidosis Ethylene glycol Salicylates Effects of albumin Anion gap may be underesitmated in hypoalbuminaemia, because if albumin decreased by 1g/L then the anion gap decreases by 0.25 Continue reading >>

Anion Gap (blood) - Health Encyclopedia - University Of Rochester Medical Center

Anion Gap (blood) - Health Encyclopedia - University Of Rochester Medical Center

If you may have swallowed a poison, such as wood alcohol, salicylate (in aspirin), and ethylene glycol (in antifreeze), your provider may test your blood for it. If your provider thinks you have ketoacidosis, you might need a urine dipstick test for ketone compounds. Ketoacidosis is a health emergency. Many things may affect your lab test results. These include the method each lab uses to do the test. Even if your test results are different from the normal value, you may not have a problem. To learn what the results mean for you, talk with your healthcare provider. Results are given in milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L). Normal results are 3 to 10mEq/L, although the normal level may vary from lab to lab. If your results are higher, it may mean that you have metabolic acidosis. Hypoalbuminemia means you haveless albumin protein than normal. If you have this condition, your expected normal result must be lower. The test requires a blood sample, which is drawn through a needle from a vein in your arm. Taking a blood sample with a needle carries risks that include bleeding, infection, bruising, or feeling dizzy. When the needle pricks your arm, you may feel a slight stinging sensation or pain. Afterward, the site may be slightly sore. Being dehydrated or retaining water in your body can affect your results. Antibiotics such as penicillin can also affect your results. You don't need to prepare for this test. But be sure your healthcare provider knows about all medicines, herbs, vitamins, and supplements you are taking. This includes medicines that don't need a prescription and any illicit drugs you may use. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a condition that results from when the body is deprived of the ability to use glucose as an energy source. Usually this is due to a lack of insulin. Insulin is used to uptake glucose into the cells to be used for energy. If there is no insulin or the cells are resistant to insulin, the blood sugar levels increase to dangerous levels for the patient. It seems counter intuitive that the patient wouldn't have energy with such high levels of glucose, but this glucose is essentially unusable without insulin. Because your body needs energy to survive, it starts turning to alternative fuel sources (fat). Fat cells start breaking down and, as a result, release ketones (which are acidic) into the bloodstream. Hence the name: diabetic ketoacidosis. “High levels of ketones can poison the body. When levels get too high, you can develop DKA. DKA may happen to anyone with diabetes, though it is rare in people with type 2. Treatment for DKA usually takes place in the hospital. But you can help prevent it by learning the warning signs and checking your urine and blood regularly.” Causes The most common causes of DKA are not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection, becoming dehydrated, or a combination of these issues. It seems like it occurs mainly in patients with type one diabetes. Symptoms Some of the symptoms that people experience with DKA include the following: Excessive thirst and urination (more water is pulled into the urine as a result of high ketone loss in the urine) Lethargy Breathing very quickly (patients have a very high level of acids in their bloodstream and they try to "blow" off carbon dioxide by breathing quickly) A fruity odor on their breath (ketones have a fruity smell) Nausea and vomiting (the body tries to get rid of acid Continue reading >>

Electrolytes

Electrolytes

On This Site Elsewhere On The Web Ask a Laboratory Scientist Your questions will be answered by a laboratory scientist as part of a voluntary service provided by one of our partners, the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). Click on the Contact a Scientist button below to be re-directed to the ASCLS site to complete a request form. If your question relates to this web site and not to a specific lab test, please submit it via our Contact Us page instead. Thank you. Continue reading >>

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Normal Values pH = 7.38 - 7.42 [H+] = 40 nM/L for a pH of 7.4 PaCO2 = 40 mm Hg [HCO3] = 24 meq/L Acid base definitions Acid base disorder is considered present when there is abnormality in HCO3 or PaCO2 or pH. Acidosis and alkalosis refer to in-vivo derangement's and not to any change in pH. Acidemia (pH < 7.38) and Alkalemia (pH >7.42) refer to derangement's of blood pH. Kidney and Respiratory system play a key roles in maintaining the acid base status. Primary Acid base disorders Metabolic acidosis loss of [HCO3] 0r addition of [H+] Metabolic alkalosis loss of [H+] or addition of [HCO3] Respiratory acidosis increase in pCO2 Respiratory alkalosis decrease in pCO2 Recquired lab values/information Arterial blood gases: pH, PaCO2,PaO2,Sat,CO BUN, Glucose, Creatinine FIO2 and Clinical history Anion and Cations ANIONS CATIONS Chloride Sodium Bicarbonate(Total CO2) Potassium Proteins Calcium Organic acids Magnesium Phosphates Sulfates Electrochemical balance means that the total anions are the same as total Cations. For practical purposes anion gap is calculated using only Sodium, Chlorides and Total CO2.((140-(104+24)) = 12. Compensatory measures Buffering---occurs immediately Respiratory regulation of pCO2 is intermediate (12-24 hours) Renal regulation of [H] and [HCO3] occurs more slowly (several days) Extracellular almost entirely through bicarbonate whose concentration highest of all buffers small contribution from phosphate Intracellular Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Buffer systems Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Bicarbonate Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abbas E. Kitabchi, PhD., MD., FACP, FACE Professor of Medicine & Molecular Sciences and Maston K. Callison Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism UT Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Aidar R. Gosmanov, M.D., Ph.D., D.M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, Suite 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Clinical Recognition Omission of insulin and infection are the two most common precipitants of DKA. Non-compliance may account for up to 44% of DKA presentations; while infection is less frequently observed in DKA patients. Acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke, acute thrombosis) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing`s syndrome, hyperthyroidism) and impaired thermo-regulation or recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones, and worsening of peripheral insulin resistance. Medications such as diuretics, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, second-generation anti-psychotics, and/or anti-convulsants may affect carbohydrate metabolism and volume status and, therefore, could precipitateDKA. Other factors: psychological problems, eating disorders, insulin pump malfunction, and drug abuse. It is now recognized that new onset T2DM can manifest with DKA. These patients are obese, mostly African Americans or Hispanics and have undiagnosed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin action. A recent report suggests that cocaine abuse is an independent risk factor associated with DKA recurrence. Pathophysiology In Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis, also termed hyperchloremic acidosis, is frequently detected in seriously ill patients. The most common mechanisms leading to this acid–base disorder include loss of large quantities of base secondary to diarrhea and administration of large quantities of chloride-containing solutions in the treatment of hypovolemia and various shock states. The resultant acidic milieu can cause cellular dysfunction and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. The associated change in the chloride concentration in the distal tubule lumen might also play a role in reducing the glomerular filtration rate. Administration of base is often recommended for the treatment of acute non-anion gap acidosis. Importantly, the blood pH and/or serum bicarbonate concentration to guide the initiation of treatment has not been established for this type of metabolic acidosis; and most clinicians use guidelines derived from studies of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Therapeutic complications resulting from base administration such as volume overload, exacerbation of hypertension and reduction in ionized calcium are likely to be as common as with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. On the other hand, exacerbation of intracellular acidosis due to the excessive generation of carbon dioxide might be less frequent than in high anion gap metabolic acidosis because of better tissue perfusion and the ability to eliminate carbon dioxide. Further basic and clinical research is needed to facilitate development of evidence-based guidelines for therapy of this important and increasingly common acid–base disorder. Introduction Acute metabolic acidosis (defined temporally as lasting minutes to a few days) has traditionally been divided into two major categories based on the level Continue reading >>

Acid-base Disorders

Acid-base Disorders

Content currently under development Acid-base disorders are a group of conditions characterized by changes in the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) or bicarbonate (HCO3-), which lead to changes in the arterial blood pH. These conditions can be categorized as acidoses or alkaloses and have a respiratory or metabolic origin, depending on the cause of the imbalance. Diagnosis is made by arterial blood gas (ABG) interpretation. In the setting of metabolic acidosis, calculation of the anion gap is an important resource to narrow down the possible causes and reach a precise diagnosis. Treatment is based on identifying the underlying cause. Continue reading >>

Clinical Aspects Of The Anion Gap

Clinical Aspects Of The Anion Gap

The anion gap (AG) is a calculated parameter derived from measured serum/plasma electrolyte concentrations. The clinical value of this calculated parameter is the main focus of this article. Both increased and reduced anion gap have clinical significance, but the deviation from normal that has most clinical significance is increased anion gap associated with metabolic acidosis. This reflects the main clinical utility of the anion gap, which is to help in elucidating disturbances of acid-base balance. The article begins with a discussion of the concept of the anion gap, how it is calculated and issues surrounding the anion gap reference interval. CONCEPT OF THE ANION GAP - ITS DEFINITION AND CALCULATION Blood plasma is an aqueous (water) solution containing a plethora of chemical species including some that have a net electrical charge, the result of dissociation of salts and acids in the aqueous medium. Those that have a net positive charge are called cations and those with a net negative charge are called anions; collectively these electrically charged species are called ions. The law of electrochemical neutrality demands that, in common with all solutions, blood serum/plasma is electrochemically neutral so that the sum of the concentration of cations always equals the sum of the concentration of anions [1]. This immutable law is reflected in FIGURE 1, a graphic display of the concentration of the major ions normally present in plasma/serum. It is clear from this that quantitatively the most significant cation in plasma is sodium (Na+), and the most significant anions are chloride (Cl-) and bicarbonate HCO3-. The concentration of these three plasma constituents (sodium, chloride and bicarbonate) along with the cation potassium (K+) are routinely measured in the clinica Continue reading >>

Mind The Gap: Anion Gap Acidosis

Mind The Gap: Anion Gap Acidosis

A step by step approach to uncovering the cause of an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. We learn about the MUD PILES, the causes of anion gap acidosis, as medical students. And it gets even further drilled into us in residency. But sorting out a gap acidosis can be real challenge, even with a nifty mnemonic. To help us get smarter in understanding some of the nuance of gap acidosis, Sean Nordt, MD, PharmD. Case: Alcoholic, diabetic with a blood glucose of 295, bicarbonate of 12, and an anion gap 28. Is this alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), toxic alcohol, something else? What is the cognitive process for sorting out this anion gap acidosis? Nordt: Without additional history, send… -Ethanol level -VBG -UA -Serum ketones (acetone and beta hydroxybutyrate) if possible -Serum calcium- a good surrogate marker for ethylene glycol. Most hospitals have a volatile alcohol screen looking for methanol and isopropanol, but not ethylene glycol. To detect ethylene glycol, you’ll need to look at surrogate markers. -Start IV fluids Case continues: The patient has a normal mental status. Heart rhythm is sinus tachycardia in the low 100s. To treat this sinus tachycardia, he gets the sinus tachycardia antidote – 3 liters of normal saline. Since AKA (a starvation and volume depletion ketosis) is high on the differential diagnosis, he also gets a hamburger and apple juice. His labs are rechecked and few hours later and his bicarbonate is unchanged at 12 and anion gap drops slightly from 28 to 24. How fast should the anion gap and serum bicarbonate to correct in AKA? Nordt: It should start to improve in 1-2 hours and takes about 5-7 hours to reverse. If the anion gap and bicarbonate aren’t improving (or getting worse) in an hour or two, think about an al Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

The anion gap is the difference between primary measured cations (sodium Na+ and potassium K+) and the primary measured anions (chloride Cl- and bicarbonate HCO3-) in serum. This test is most commonly performed in patients who present with altered mental status, unknown exposures, acute renal failure, and acute illnesses. [1] See the Anion Gap calculator. The reference range of the anion gap is 3-11 mEq/L The normal value for the serum anion gap is 8-16 mEq/L. However, there are always unmeasurable anions, so an anion gap of less than 11 mEq/L using any of the equations listed in Description is considered normal. For the urine anion gap, the most prominently unmeasured anion is ammonia. Healthy subjects typically have a gap of 0 to slightly normal (< 10 mEq/L). A urine anion gap of more than 20 mEq/L is seen in metabolic acidosis when the kidneys are unable to excrete ammonia (such as in renal tubular acidosis). If the urine anion gap is zero or negative but the serum AG is positive, the source is most likely gastrointestinal (diarrhea or vomiting). [2] Continue reading >>

Lab Test Interpretation

Lab Test Interpretation

The various multiparameter blood chemistry and hematology profilesoffered by most labs represent an economical way by which alarge amount of information concerning a patient's physiologic statuscan be made available to the physician. The purpose of this monograph isto serve as a reference for the interpretation of abnormalities of eachof the parameters. Because reference ranges (except for some lipid studies)are typically defined as the range of values of the median 95% of thehealthy population, it is unlikely that a given specimen, even from ahealthy patient, will show "normal" values for all the tests ina lengthy profile. Therefore, caution should be exercised to preventoverreaction to miscellaneous, mild abnormalities without clinicalcorrelate. Units of measurement: America against the world American labs use a different version of the metric system than doesmost of the rest of the world, which uses the SystmeInternationale (SI). In some cases translation between the twosystems is easy, but the difference between the two is most pronouncedin measurement of chemical concentration. The American system generallyuses mass per unit volume, while SI uses moles per unit volume. Sincemass per mole varies with the molecular weight of the analyte,conversion between American and SI units requires many differentconversion factors. Where appropriate, in this paper SI units are givenafter American units. Dennis Jay, PhD, has kindly made available anonline converter between SI and conventional units: Increase in serum sodium is seenin conditions with water loss in excessof salt loss, as in profuse sweating, severe diarrhea or vomiting,polyuria (as in diabetes mellitus or insipidus), hypergluco- ormineralocorticoidism, and inadequate water intake. Drugs causingelevated sodium inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Serum Anion Gap | Md Nexus

Serum Anion Gap | Md Nexus

Clinical Utility: calculation of the anion gap is useful to differentiate anion gap metabolic acidoses (AGMA) (see Metabolic Acidosis-Elevated Anion Gap , [[Metabolic Acidosis-Elevated Anion Gap]]) from non-anion gap metabolic acidoses (NAGMA) (see Metabolic Acidosis-Normal Anion Gap , [[Metabolic Acidosis-Normal Anion Gap]]) Anion gap reflects the difference between unmeasured anions (i.e. the anions in the blood that are not routinely measured) unmeasured cations Normal Anion Gap Values: laboratory-dependent (so the laboratory should publish their normal range) Correction of Anion Gap for Serum Albumin: since albumin represents the major unmeasured anion responsible for the anion gap (with a net negative charge at physiologic pH), the expected anion gap must be corrected for serum albumin Anion Gap Decreases 2.3-2.5 mEq/L for Each 1 g/dL Decrease in the Serum Albumin: Corrected Anion Gap = (Measured Anion Gap) + [2.5 x (4.5 Serum Albumin)] Correction of Anion Gap for Hyperkalemia: since potassium is an unmeasured cation For example, serum potassium of 6.0 mEq/L will decrease the anion gap by 2 mEq/L Correction of Anion Gap for Hypercalcemia: since calcium is an unmeasured cation, hypercalcemia decreases the anion gap Correction of Anion Gap for Hypermagnesemia: since magnesium is an unmeasured cation, hypermagnesemia decreases the anion gap Comparison of the Delta Gap and Delta Bicarbonate In an Isolated Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis, the Delta Gap = Delta Bicarbonate: anion gap generally increases by the same amount that the serum bicarbonate decreases (however, there are exceptions, as noted below) Delta Anion Gap/Delta Bicarbonate Ratio in Lactic Acidosis is Typically Around 1.6: although since hydrogen ion buffering in cells and bone may take several hours to equi Continue reading >>

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