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Dka Anion Gap

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D-lactate: A Novel Contributor To Metabolic Acidosis And High Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

D-lactate: A Novel Contributor To Metabolic Acidosis And High Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA),the most common and serious acute complication of diabetes, is characterized by hyperglycemia and severe high–anion-gap metabolic acidosis with ketonemia (1). In DKA, the high anion gap is attributed largely to excessive production of blood ketone bodies, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate quantification is recommended for the diagnosis and monitoring of DKA (2). However, even counting of all the ketone bodies, including β-hydroxybutyrate, does not account for the entire anion gap, suggesting that there are additional sources of anion production in DKA. We recently demonstrated that plasma d-lactate concentrations were greatly increased in DKA compared with the concentrations in diabetic patients or a healthy control group (3). Nevertheless, the clinical value of d-lactate measurement in metabolic acidosis, especially the contribution of d-lactate to the metabolic acidosis and high anion gap in DKA, is not well appreciated. We report here that decreasing d-lactate concentrations are associated with improved clinical situations, whereas increased lactate concentrations are associated with the severity of metabolic acidosis and high anion gap in patients with DKA. The study included 38 diabetic patients with DKA, 42 diabetic patients without DKA, and 40 healthy controls. The institutional ethics review board of the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College approved the study, and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. For patients with DKA, blood samples were collected at the time of admission to the emergency room and following medical treatment after admission, when the patient's condition became stabilized. Plasma methylglyoxal was assayed by LC-MS (3). Plasma d-lactate concentration was determined by an e Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

Pathophysiology sample values BMP/ELECTROLYTES: Na+ = 140 Cl− = 100 BUN = 20 / Glu = 150 K+ = 4 CO2 = 22 PCr = 1.0 \ ARTERIAL BLOOD GAS: HCO3− = 24 paCO2 = 40 paO2 = 95 pH = 7.40 ALVEOLAR GAS: pACO2 = 36 pAO2 = 105 A-a g = 10 OTHER: Ca = 9.5 Mg2+ = 2.0 PO4 = 1 CK = 55 BE = −0.36 AG = 16 SERUM OSMOLARITY/RENAL: PMO = 300 PCO = 295 POG = 5 BUN:Cr = 20 URINALYSIS: UNa+ = 80 UCl− = 100 UAG = 5 FENa = 0.95 UK+ = 25 USG = 1.01 UCr = 60 UO = 800 PROTEIN/GI/LIVER FUNCTION TESTS: LDH = 100 TP = 7.6 AST = 25 TBIL = 0.7 ALP = 71 Alb = 4.0 ALT = 40 BC = 0.5 AST/ALT = 0.6 BU = 0.2 AF alb = 3.0 SAAG = 1.0 SOG = 60 CSF: CSF alb = 30 CSF glu = 60 CSF/S alb = 7.5 CSF/S glu = 0.4 The anion gap[1][2] (AG or AGAP) is a value calculated from the results of multiple individual medical lab tests. It may be reported with the results of an Electrolyte Panel, which is often performed as part of a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel.[3] The anion gap is the difference between the measured cations (positively charged ions) and the measured anions (negatively charged ions) in serum, plasma, or urine. The magnitude of this difference (i.e., "gap") in the serum is often calculated in medicine when attempting to identify the cause of metabolic acidosis, a lower than normal pH in the blood. If the gap is greater than normal, then high anion gap metabolic acidosis is diagnosed. The term "anion gap" usually implies "serum anion gap", but the urine anion gap is also a clinically useful measure.[4][5][6][7] Calculation[edit] The anion gap is a calculated measure. This means that it is not directly measured by a specific lab test; rather, it is computed with a formula that uses the results of several individual lab tests, each of which measures the concentration of a specific anion or cation. The concentr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

The Anion Gap

The Anion Gap

The anion gap is a tool used to: Confirm that an acidosis is indeed metabolic Narrow down the cause of a metabolic acidosis Monitor the progress of treatment In a metabolic acidosis the anion gap is usually either ‘Normal’ or ‘High’. In rare cases it can be ‘low’, usually due to hypoalbuminaemia. An ABG machine will often give a print out of the anion gap, but it can also be useful to know how it is calculated. In blood, there are many cations and anions. However, the vast majority of the total number are potassium, sodium, chloride, or bicarbonate. The ‘anion’ gap is an artificial measure, which is calculated by subtracting the total number of anions (negatively charged ions – bicarbonate and chloride) from the total number of cations (sodium and potassium). Thus, the formula is: ([Na+]+ [K+]) –([Cl–]+ [HCO3–]) In reality, the concentration of potassium anions is negligible, and this often omitted. There are usually more measurable cations than anions, and thus a normal anion gap is value is positive. A normal value is usually 3-16, but may vary slightly depending on the technique used by the local laboratory. If the anion gap is <30, then there may not be ‘true’ high anion gap metabolic acidosis. In a healthy normal individual, the main unmeasured anions are albumin and phosphate. Almost all of the gap can be attributed to albumin. This means that in patients with hypoalbuminaemia and metabolic acidosis, there may be a normal anion gap. Be wary in severely unwell patients because they often have a low albumin. You can adjust for this in your calculation. Corrected anion gap: [AG] + (0.25 x (40-albumin)) In an unwell patient with a high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) the anion gap is increased due: Accumulation of organic acids Inabili Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis, also termed hyperchloremic acidosis, is frequently detected in seriously ill patients. The most common mechanisms leading to this acid–base disorder include loss of large quantities of base secondary to diarrhea and administration of large quantities of chloride-containing solutions in the treatment of hypovolemia and various shock states. The resultant acidic milieu can cause cellular dysfunction and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. The associated change in the chloride concentration in the distal tubule lumen might also play a role in reducing the glomerular filtration rate. Administration of base is often recommended for the treatment of acute non-anion gap acidosis. Importantly, the blood pH and/or serum bicarbonate concentration to guide the initiation of treatment has not been established for this type of metabolic acidosis; and most clinicians use guidelines derived from studies of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Therapeutic complications resulting from base administration such as volume overload, exacerbation of hypertension and reduction in ionized calcium are likely to be as common as with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. On the other hand, exacerbation of intracellular acidosis due to the excessive generation of carbon dioxide might be less frequent than in high anion gap metabolic acidosis because of better tissue perfusion and the ability to eliminate carbon dioxide. Further basic and clinical research is needed to facilitate development of evidence-based guidelines for therapy of this important and increasingly common acid–base disorder. Introduction Acute metabolic acidosis (defined temporally as lasting minutes to a few days) has traditionally been divided into two major categories based on the level Continue reading >>

Jaime Moo-young, Md

Jaime Moo-young, Md

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Pathogenesis · Insufficient insulin for a given carbohydrate load decreased cellular metabolism of glucose · Increased gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysisHyperglycemia · Increased breakdown of free fatty acids as alternative energy source ketone and ketoacid accumulation · Hyperglycemiaserum hyperosmolality osmotic diuresis dehydration and electrolyte derangements (dehydration is most lethal!) · Seen almost exclusively in Type I diabetes; rarely in Type II Definition: Triad of 1. Hyperglycemia (usually between 500 – 800 mg/dL or 27.8-44.4 mmol/L) 2. Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis (pH usually <7.30) 3. Ketonemia: -hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate most significant ** Urine ketones do not make the diagnosis, but they can support it** Triggers (the “I’sâ€): Don’t forget to ask about these! · Insulin deficiency: insulin non-compliance, insufficient insulin dosing, new-onset Type I diabetes · Iatrognic: glucocorticoids, atypical antipsychotics, high-dose thiazide diuretics · Infection: UTI, pneumonia, TB · Inflammation: pancreatitis, cholecystitis · Ischemia/infarction: MI, stroke, gut ischemia · Intoxication: Alcohol, cocaine, other drugs Presentation · Symptoms · Polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss · Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain · Fatigue, malaise · Associated trigger sx (fever/chills, chest pain, etc) · Signs · Volume depletion: skin turgor, dry axillae, dry mucus membranes, HR, BP · Altered mental status: stupor, coma · Kussmaul respirations: rapid, shallow breathing = hyperventilation to counteract metabolic acidosis · Fruity, acetone odor on breath Lab workup and findings · Hyperglycemia: > 250 mg/dL in serum, + glucose on urinalysis · Acidemia (pH <7. Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

SEEBRI NEOHALER should not be initiated in patients with acutely deteriorating or potentially life-threatening episodes of COPD or used as rescue therapy for acute episodes of bronchospasm. Acute symptoms should be treated with an inhaled short-acting beta2-agonist. As with other inhaled medicines, SEEBRI NEOHALER can produce paradoxical bronchospasm that may be life threatening. If paradoxical bronchospasm occurs following dosing with SEEBRI NEOHALER, it should be treated immediately with an inhaled, short-acting bronchodilator; SEEBRI NEOHALER should be discontinued immediately and alternative therapy instituted. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with SEEBRI NEOHALER. If signs occur, discontinue immediately and institute alternative therapy. SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with severe hypersensitivity to milk proteins. SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma and in patients with urinary retention. Prescribers and patients should be alert for signs and symptoms of acute narrow-angle glaucoma (e.g., eye pain or discomfort, blurred vision, visual halos or colored images in association with red eyes from conjunctival congestion and corneal edema) and of urinary retention (e.g., difficulty passing urine, painful urination), especially in patients with prostatic hyperplasia or bladder-neck obstruction. Patients should be instructed to consult a physician immediately should any of these signs or symptoms develop. The most common adverse events reported in ≥1% of patients taking SEEBRI NEOHALER, and occurring more frequently than in patients taking placebo, were upper respiratory tract infection (3.4% vs 2.3%), nasopharyngitis (2.1% vs 1.9%), oropharyngeal pain (1.8% vs 1.2%), urinary t Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

The anion gap is the difference between primary measured cations (sodium Na+ and potassium K+) and the primary measured anions (chloride Cl- and bicarbonate HCO3-) in serum. This test is most commonly performed in patients who present with altered mental status, unknown exposures, acute renal failure, and acute illnesses. [1] See the Anion Gap calculator. The reference range of the anion gap is 3-11 mEq/L The normal value for the serum anion gap is 8-16 mEq/L. However, there are always unmeasurable anions, so an anion gap of less than 11 mEq/L using any of the equations listed in Description is considered normal. For the urine anion gap, the most prominently unmeasured anion is ammonia. Healthy subjects typically have a gap of 0 to slightly normal (< 10 mEq/L). A urine anion gap of more than 20 mEq/L is seen in metabolic acidosis when the kidneys are unable to excrete ammonia (such as in renal tubular acidosis). If the urine anion gap is zero or negative but the serum AG is positive, the source is most likely gastrointestinal (diarrhea or vomiting). [2] Continue reading >>

Anion Gap Calculator

Anion Gap Calculator

Please enable JavaScript to view all features on this site. Enter values and press 'calculate' button. Sodium (Na) Chloride (Cl) Bicarbonate (HCO3-) Anion Gap = Na - (Cl + HCO3-) (Normal = 7 - 16) Delta Gap = Anion Gap - 12 The anion gap (AG) represents the concentration of all the unmeasured anions in the plasma. See Also : Reference Values During Pregnancy, Anion Gap Causes of a High Anion Gap : MUDPILERSO M-ethanol U-remia D-iabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) or starvation ketosis P-araldehyde, Phenformin I-sopropyl Alcohol, Isoniazid ,Infection L-actic Acidosis E-thylene Glycol, ethyl alcohol R-habdomyolysis S-alicylates O-ther Causes: Hyperalbuminemia, administered anions All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither Perinatology.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

© 1996–2017 themedicalbiochemistrypage.org, LLC | info @ themedicalbiochemistrypage.org Definition of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The most severe and life threatening complication of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is characterized by metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. Diagnosis of DKA is accomplished by detection of hyperketonemia and metabolic acidosis (as measured by the anion gap) in the presence of hyperglycemia. The anion gap refers to the difference between the concentration of cations other than sodium and the concentration of anions other than chloride and bicarbonate. The anion gap therefore, represents an artificial assessment of the unmeasured ions in plasma. Calculation of the anion gap involves sodium (Na+), chloride (Cl–) and bicarbonate (HCO3–) measurements and it is defined as [Na+ – (Cl– + HCO3–)] where the sodium and chloride concentrations are measured as mEq/L and the bicarbonate concentration is mmol/L. The anion gap will increase when the concentration of plasma K+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ is decreased, when organic ions such as lactate are increased (or foreign anions accumulate), or when the concentration or charge of plasma proteins increases. Normal anion gap is between 8mEq/L and 12mEq/L and a higher number is diagnostic of metabolic acidosis. Rapid and aggressive treatment is necessary as the metabolic acidosis will result in cerebral edema and coma eventually leading to death. The hyperketonemia in DKA is the result of insulin deficiency and unregulated glucagon secretion from α-cells of the pancreas. Circulating glucagon stimulates the adipose tissue to release fatty acids stored in triglycerides. The free fatty acids enter the circulation and are taken up primarily by the liver where Continue reading >>

Calculating The Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Calculating The Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practical Pointers Discover Shortcuts Devised by Colleagues Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) frequently have hyperglycemia. Serum sodium in these patients should not be corrected for hyperglycemia to calculate the anion gap for acidosis because extracellular fluid shifts caused by hyperglycemia will dilute serum chloride and bicarbonate. If serum sodium is corrected for hyperglycemia, it will give an erroneously high anion gap and an erroneous severity of acidosis in DKA.1,2 This is an important yet not well-known fact. Continue reading >>

Anion Gap

Anion Gap

OVERVIEW Anion Gap = Na+ – (Cl- + HCO3-) The Anion Gap (AG) is a derived variable primarily used for the evaluation of metabolic acidosis to determine the presence of unmeasured anions The normal anion gap depends on serum phosphate and serum albumin concentrations An elevated anion gap strongly suggests the presence of a metabolic acidosis The normal anion gap varies with different assays, but is typically 4 to 12mmol/L (if measured by ion selective electrode; 8 to 16 if measured by older technique of flame photometry) If AG > 30 mmol/L then metabolic acidosis invariably present If AG 20-29mmol/L then 1/3 will not have a metabolic acidosis K can be added to Na+, but in practice offers little advantage ALBUMIN AND PHOSPHATE the normal anion gap depends on serum phosphate and serum albumin the normal AG = 0.2 x [albumin] (g/L) + 1.5 x [phosphate] (mmol/L) albumin is the major unmeasured anion and contributes almost the whole of the value of the anion gap. every 1g/L decrease in albumin will decrease anion gap by 0.25 mmoles a normally high anion gap acidosis in a patient with hypoalbuminaemia may appear as a normal anion gap acidosis. this is particularly relevant in ICU patients where lower albumin levels are common HIGH ANION GAP METABOLIC ACIDOSIS (HAGMA) HAGMA results from accumulation of organic acids or impaired H+ excretion Causes (LTKR) Lactate Toxins Ketones Renal Causes (CATMUDPILES) CO, CN Alcoholic ketoacidosis and starvation ketoacidosis Toluene Metformin, Methanol Uremia DKA Pyroglutamic acidosis, paracetamol, phenformin, propylene glycol, paraladehyde Iron, Isoniazid Lactic acidosis Ethylene glycol Salicylates Effects of albumin Anion gap may be underesitmated in hypoalbuminaemia, because if albumin decreased by 1g/L then the anion gap decreases by 0.25 Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Go to: Pathogenesis In both DKA and HHS, the underlying metabolic abnormality results from the combination of absolute or relative insulin deficiency and increased amounts of counterregulatory hormones. Glucose and lipid metabolism When insulin is deficient, the elevated levels of glucagon, catecholamines and cortisol will stimulate hepatic glucose production through increased glycogenolysis and enhanced gluconeogenesis4 (Fig. 1). Hypercortisolemia will result in increased proteolysis, thus providing amino acid precursors for gluconeogenesis. Low insulin and high catecholamine concentrations will reduce glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The combination of elevated hepatic glucose production and decreased peripheral glucose use is the main pathogenic disturbance responsible for hyperglycemia in DKA and HHS. The hyperglycemia will lead to glycosuria, osmotic diuresis and dehydration. This will be associated with decreased kidney perfusion, particularly in HHS, that will result in decreased glucose clearance by the kidney and thus further exacerbation of the hyperglycemia. In DKA, the low insulin levels combined with increased levels of catecholamines, cortisol and growth hormone will activate hormone-sensitive lipase, which will cause the breakdown of triglycerides and release of free fatty acids. The free fatty acids are taken up by the liver and converted to ketone bodies that are released into the circulation. The process of ketogenesis is stimulated by the increase in glucagon levels.5 This hormone will activate carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, an enzyme that allows free fatty acids in the form of coenzyme A to cross mitochondrial membranes after their esterification into carnitine. On the other side, esterification is reversed by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

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