diabetestalk.net

Dka And Potassium

Share on facebook

Career in Healthcare Management after 10th & 12th career in hospitality and jobs in hospitals and nursing homes diagnostic centers after 10th and 12th in india in this video we are try to providing complete information about healthcare jobs in india how it possible to 10th and 12th pass students can join healthcare career options and do well in this fields there is lots of course for 10th and 12th pass students to do something new in this fields with these courses like as: Courses after 10th 1. Dental Assistant : 6th Month 2. General Duty Assistant : 3 Month 3. Home Health Assistant : 3 Month Courses after 12th 1. Emergency Medical Technician : 6th Month 2. X-ray Technician : 6th Month 3. Radiology Technician : 1 year 4. Dialysiss Technician : 1 year 5. Pathology Technician : 6th Month 6. Medical Laboratory Technician : 1 year 7. Operation Theater Technician : 1 year Here we are providing for you our other career oriented videos like as: 1. Career in Digital marketing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkm35... 2. Career in Web Designing and Development https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF1T0... 3. Career in Graphic Designing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_QQi... 4. Career in E-accou

Diabetic Ketoacidosistreatment & Management

Diabetic KetoacidosisTreatment & Management Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Managing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in an intensive care unit during the first 24-48 hours always is advisable. When treating patients with DKA, the following points must be considered and closely monitored: Correction of fluid loss with intravenous fluids Correction of electrolyte disturbances, particularly potassium loss Treatment of concurrent infection, if present It is essential to maintain extreme vigilance for any concomitant process, such as infection, cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, sepsis, or deep venous thrombosis . It is important to pay close attention to the correction of fluid and electrolyte loss during the first hour of treatment. This always should be followed by gradual correction of hyperglycemia and acidosis. Correction of fluid loss makes the clinical picture clearer and may be sufficient to correct acidosis. The presence of even mild signs of dehydration indicates that at least 3 L of fluid has already been lost. Patients usually are not discharged from the hospital unless they have been able to switch back to their Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. nurseprnRN

    The hypokalemia comes when the patient gets treated with insulin, driving the glucose and K+ into the cells. The kidneys can't (and won't) move so much out through urine with the excess glucose to make for hypokalemia.

  2. Esme12

    There can be a brief period of hypoglycemia in the early stages of an elevated blood sugar (polyuria)....but by the time "ketoacidosis" sets in the Serum potassium is elevated but the cellular potassium is depleted (all that shifting that goes on)
    Diabetic ketoacidosis

  3. April2152

    So pretty much what we would observe clinically is hyperkalemia because the osmotic duiresis does not move serum potassium significantly?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Malaise, generalized weakness, and fatigability Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia Rapid weight loss in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: Gl Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. hippocampus

    What are the potassium level abnormalities associated with DKA (during diagnosis and treatment.)

  2. ahassan

    During DKA, the total body K is low bcz of osmotic diuresis, BUT the serum k conc. is raised bcz of the lack of insulin action, which allows k to shift out of the cells. So hyperkalemia.
    During treatment, k is shifted into the cells, which may lead to profound hypokalemia n death if not treated, so during therapy you have to adjust KCL conc. depending on blood K levels.

  3. tomymajor

    In DKA--> K level may be high or normal so we dont add k from the start of ttt
    But : In HHNKC---> K level is low from the start so we give k from start of ttt

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

CONTACT US:- E-mail ID for free online consultation - [email protected], Phone: +91-172-521-4030, WhatsApp: 8427864030 DESCRIPTION:- Choose fruits and vegetables that are lower in potassium because when you have kidney disease, the kidneys aren't as effective at removing excess potassium from the blood. Read more about diet in ckd - http://www.planetayurveda.com/diet_ki...

Dka And Potassium

1 So I had a situation the other day when I came on shift and took a patient from an RN, and she goes, "This patient has DKA, started the insulin drip, K was 6.3 so we gave Kayexalate..." I stopped her and was like, Kayexalate what the hell?! She said, "Well, the potassium was 6.3 and the doctor ordered it, so I gave it." When I worked ICU (at a different hospital), standard orders and hospital policy were 1) rehydrate, 2) insulin drip, 3) start KCl IV as you begin the insulin drip, even in the presence of elevated serum K+ levels, which is most likely transitory. DKA patients are significantly potassium-deficient as well as profoundly dehydrated, and as insulin is administered, K+ will influx back into the cell. I said all this and the RN looked at me like I was from bizarro world. Several of the other ER RNs seemed not to be aware of this, and the fact that the ER physician ordered Kayexalate was really hard for me to fathom. I shipped the patient to ICU not long after, so I don't know what happened. What do y'all think? I feel like maybe I should talk to our unit educator. We don't see nearly as much DKA in my suburban ER as we did in my nasty dirty central-city ICU... I feel li Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Why Is Potassium High In Dka?

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life‐threatening metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycaemia, ketosis (ketonaemia or ketonuria) and acidosis are the cardinal features of DKA [1]. Other features that indicate the severity of DKA include volume depletion, acidosis and concurrent electrolyte disturbances, especially abnormalities of potassium homeostasis [1,2]. We describe a type 2 diabetic patient presenting with severe g ...

    diabetes Apr 29, 2018
  • Dka And Potassium

    Diabetic KetoacidosisTreatment & Management Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Managing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in an intensive care unit during the first 24-48 hours always is advisable. When treating patients with DKA, the following points must be considered and closely monitored: Correction of fluid loss with intravenous fluids Correction of electrolyte disturbances, particularly potassium l ...

    ketosis May 29, 2018
  • Potassium Shift In Dka

    A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic keto ...

    ketosis Apr 15, 2018
  • Dka Potassium Replacement

    INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS, also known as hyperosmotic hyperglycemic nonketotic state [HHNK]) are two of the most serious acute complications of diabetes. They are part of the spectrum of hyperglycemia, and each represents an extreme in the spectrum. The treatment of DKA and HHS in adults will be reviewed here. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis of t ...

    ketosis Jan 14, 2018
  • Why Is There Low Potassium In Dka?

    Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process ...

    ketosis Apr 28, 2018
  • How Does Dka Affect Potassium?

    Diabetes mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions whose common hallmark is a raised blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to an absolute or relative deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. In the UK there are 1.4 million registered diabetic patients, approximately 3 % of the population. In addition, an estimated 1 million remain undiagnosed. It is a growing health problem: In 1998, the World Health Organization (WHO) pr ...

    ketosis Dec 30, 2017

Popular Articles

More in ketosis