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Difference Between Nutritional Ketosis And Starvation Ketosis

Difference Between Keto And Fat Adaptation

Difference Between Keto And Fat Adaptation

What is the difference between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis, Keto adaption and Fat adaption and something I refer to as metabolic flexibility? So let’s start with the difference between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis. Wikipedia says Ketosis is a metabolic state in which most of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides most of the energy. Dr Peter Attia of Eating Acedemy says – Ketosis is a state, achieved through significant reduction of carbohydrate intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), at which point the body makes a fundamental change from relying on glycogen as its main source of energy to relying on fat as the primary source of energy. In particular, the brain shifts from being entirely dependent on glucose, to being primarily dependent on beta-hydroxybutyrate – a so-called “ketone body.” Ketone bodies are chemical structures made by the liver (also somewhat in the kidney) out of fatty acids, primarily. Ketosis is simply the mechanism in which the body begins to burn fat for fuel by producing ketones in the liver rather than glucose. This happens when carbohydrate/glucose is removed from the diet and the body begins to produce ketones, this is ketosis. Ketoacidosis is typically a state that occurs in T1 diabetics and is a combination of high ketones and high BG, although it can happen in other situations including alcoholics. The cause is extremely elevated ketone levels of say 15 mmol or higher and high levels of Blood Glucose. That said there is need for concern should your ketones get above say 10 mmol. Basically what happenes, the body fails to manage or regulate ketone production causing uncontrolled ketosis. It happens when the individuals BG levels are e Continue reading >>

Is There A Difference Between Nutritional Ketosis Vs. Ketosis?

Is There A Difference Between Nutritional Ketosis Vs. Ketosis?

Just to be clear, “nutritional ketosis” is a biological state in which your body is generating ketone bodies to feed your brain in a well-fed state. Your body will also switch to ketone bodies as a primary food source during starvation. But nutritional ketosis is different in a number of ways from starvation. So if you are not starving and you are not taking exogenous ketones and you are getting measurable blood ketone levels, then you are in “nutritional ketosis”. Awesome. Nutritional ketosis is not at all something you would experience from taking exogenous ketones as another answerer suggests. Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Fasting And Starvation

The Difference Between Fasting And Starvation

The big misconception about fasting and starvation is that theyre the same thing. Although they might seem very similar, theyre actually distinctive metabolic states. Theres quite a significant difference between them. Theyre almost like day and night. The Difference Between Fasting and Starvation Fasting is the complete abstention from food in any shape or form. Usually, people still drink water and other non-caloric beverages . Its voluntary and controlled. Youve planned it and are doing it because youve decided to do so. Starvation, on the other hand, is described as the absence of essential nutrients that could support the life of an organism. Whenever the body cant get access to fuel or has run out of it, then it begins to slowly die and waste away. This is irrational and involuntary. Its forced upon and not something you choose. The difference between fasting and starvation is like the difference between suicide and dying of old age. One is deliberate and carefully orchestrated, whereas the other is something that simply happens to you without you being able to do anything about it. Of course, here fasting resembles suicide because its self-imposed, but its not going to end with death. The idea remains. Abstention from food is the art of manipulating our metabolic system and can be done for many reasons. Malpractice might look like the person is starving, but if done correctly its very healthy and good for you. Our body can only be in 2 metabolic states Fasted meaning that there are no exogenous calories consumed at all. Fed there is some food circulating the bloodstream. Even consuming small amounts of food will put you into a fed state. It doesnt matter whether you eat 200 calories or 1000, youll still inhibit autophagy and be shifted out of a fasted state. Tha Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Understanding Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Understanding Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Ketosis is a state in which the body starts burning fat for energy due to lack of new glucose in the diet. Althugh ketosis is commonly seen in individuals participating in a low-carb diet, it is also seen in people suffering from a lack of insulin as well as prolonged periods of fasting or starvation. Carbohydrates provide the body with glucose. The pancreas secretes a hormone called insulin that works with the glucose in the bloodstream to provide energy to the body's organs and cells. When the glucose supply is exhausted, it begins to break down stored fat to meet its energy needs for normal functioning. The accumulation of ketone molecules in the blood make it extremely acidic. This irritates the kidneys, which flush out ketones through urine. Ketosis gets its name from the ketones that are produced in the process of breaking down the fat. In a healthy person, the amount of fat that is burned and ketones that are produced is tightly controlled, causing no harmful side effects. Dietary ketosis seen in those participating in low-carbohydrate diets can be quite helpful in losing weight, as fat is burned in the entire process to gain energy. As ketosis is usually a diet-induced process, it isn’t harmful, unlike ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening condition. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs Keto-adapted

Ketosis Vs Keto-adapted

As you might know already, I started a Facebook group called Ketogenic Success as a positive, success-oriented community of like-minded folks who are on their own keto journey. Well, the group is growing every day (almost 15k members as of right now), which is awesome. Because the group is growing so fast, new folks will frequently ask the same questions. There’s nothing wrong with that. Asking questions is how we all learn and grow. So I wanted to take some time to address one of the most common questions we see in the group: What’s the difference between being in ketosis and being keto-adapted? It’s easy to see why this is such a confusing topic, and it’s not made easier by the common misconceptions (and just plain errors) that seem to abound. First, let’s address the subject of ketosis. Ketosis is a situation where your body is producing ketones. There are three ketone bodies: acetone, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Ketones are produced hepatically (which is a fancy way of saying “by the liver”) as a product of breaking down fatty acids. But there’s a bit of a problem with this simple definition of ketosis. You see, your liver is constantly breaking down fatty acids, and therefore creating ketones, but it would be difficult to say that you’re in ketosis. That’s because the level of ketones isn’t high enough to be considered ketosis. So, having ketones in your body doesn’t necessarily mean you’re in ketosis. Okay. Cool. Cool, cool, cool. But, hey…so…wait a sec. Is there, like, a level of ketones that DOES mean you’re in ketosis? Well…yes. Yes, there is. Dr. Stephen Phinney is the grandmaster of ketogenic research (along with Dr. Jeff Volek), and he’s the person who coined the term “nutritional ketosis.” Before Phi Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals

Breath acetone is a reliable indicator of ketosis in adults consuming ketogenic meals From the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. Reprints not available. Address correspondence to K Musa-Veloso, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 76, Issue 1, July 2002, Pages 6570, Kathy Musa-Veloso, Sergei S Likhodii, Stephen C Cunnane, Breath acetone is a reliable indicator of ketosis in adults consuming ketogenic meals, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 76, Issue 1, July 2002, Pages 6570, Background: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. Objective: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and -hydroxybutyrate. Design: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and -hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. Results: Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis, Part Ii – Ketogenic Diet In Weight Control And Sports

Nutritional Ketosis, Part Ii – Ketogenic Diet In Weight Control And Sports

(Continued from Part I) One of the primary benefits of ketogenic diet – and also the one that is easy to track – is improved body composition. Once again, we are not interested in total “weight loss” per se – what we are interested in is reducing body fat, while maintaining lean muscle mass. Both have profoundly positive effects on health, longevity and quality of life. Why is ketogenic diet so effective for getting rid of body fat? Why is it more effective than, say, “low-fat” or “low-calorie” diets, popularized and promoted in the last several decades and still prevailing in the minds of most dieters? The dogmatic belief that “eating fat will make you fat” is very far from truth. Not only restricting fat is not the preferred method of weight control (because fats maintain the integrity of your cells, serve as precursors to important hormones – including testosterone, which accelerated lean muscle synthesis and fat burn – and because restricting fats almost inevitably means increasing carbs if you don’t want to starve), but also – restricting fat does not prevent the dreaded cardiovascular disease (because quality fat rarely causes one to begin with) – quite the contrary. There are numerous studies and countless personal stories, which confirm that very-low-carbohydrate-high-fat (VLKHF) diets are generally more effective (often significantly more effective) in weight loss – they work better than calorie-restriction and many popular diets out there, including the Mediterranean and low-fat diets. So if fat doesn’t make you fat, what does? The answer is – excess carbohydrates. For the purposes of this article, we are not going to dive too much into the reasons why carbs make you fat (fluctuating insulin, disrupted leptin/ghrelin mecha Continue reading >>

What's A Keto Diet?

What's A Keto Diet?

What is a ketogenic diet and how does it work? The process was initially developed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder as an effective, non-pharmacological treatment for intractable childhood epilepsy. The process works when the body is put into a metabolic state called Ketosis, where ketones become the main source of energy for the brain and body to function. The ketogenic diet plan is high in fat and low in carbohydrates while supplying adequate protein to the body. This specific combination changes the manner in which your body uses energy. Additionally, while reducing epileptic seizures, this process lowers glucose levels while improving the body’s resistance to insulin. So I know a lot of you are probably wondering "what is Ketosis?" am I right? By definition, it is when your body goes through a metabolic state in which the body transforms ketones created from fat into energy, instead of energy created from converting carbohydrates. What are they exactly did you ask? Biochemically speaking, ketones are organic, carbon-based compounds that contain a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and two carbon-containing substituents, denoted by “R.” Ketones are considered simple compounds because they do not contain chemical groups that are readily reactive. Fatty acids in the body are oxidized by the liver for energy production. There are 3 different ketone bodies produced in mitochondria of the liver: acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Some of these fatty acids are oxidized by the liver for energy production while others can be partially oxidized to form the substrate acetoacetate, which is then converted to beta-hydroxybutyric acid; collective. These bodies produced in the liver are referred to as endogenous ketone bodies and are those Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Ketoacidosis is the term used for metabolic acidoses associated with an accumulation of ketone bodies. The most common cause of ketoacidosis is diabetic ketoacidosis. Two other causes are fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis will be reviewed here. Issues related to diabetic ketoacidosis are discussed in detail elsewhere. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Treatment".) PHYSIOLOGY OF KETONE BODIES There are three major ketone bodies, with the interrelationships shown in the figure (figure 1): Acetoacetic acid is the only true ketoacid. The more dominant acid in patients with ketoacidosis is beta-hydroxybutyric acid, which results from the reduction of acetoacetic acid by NADH. Beta-hydroxybutyric acid is a hydroxyacid, not a true ketoacid. Continue reading >>

Is A Nutritional Ketosis Diet Safe And Effective?

Is A Nutritional Ketosis Diet Safe And Effective?

/ Is a Nutritional Ketosis Diet Safe and Effective? Is a Nutritional Ketosis Diet Safe and Effective? Diets come in a lot of different forms. Often the emphasis is on decreasing your calorie intake, but even then, there is a range of different ways that this is achieved. Counting calories is one example, as are low-fat diets and low-carb diets. Other approaches are more complex. In some cases, this might involve using food intake to make the body behave in a certain way. A nutritional ketosis diet is one example of this and today were going to look at this type of diet. Before we get started though, I want to note that this type of diet isnt as complex as it first seems and many people do follow it successfully. The Science and Overall Concept of the Diet The most complicated part of a nutritional ketosis diet is the science behind it. Basically, a ketosis diet is unusual, because it aims to put your body in a specific metabolic state, known as ketosis. When your body is in ketosis the liver acts in a different way to normal and produces molecules that are called ketone bodies. The site Perfect Keto discusses these, along with their implications for the body. The term ketone bodies is typically used interchangeably with ketones, although other people argue that ketone bodies are a specific subset of ketones that have specific implications for dieting. The three ketone bodies that are significant in a nutritional ketone diet are acetoacetic acid, acetone and beta-hydrobutyric acid ( 1 ). The basic chemical structure of the substances is shown below. Technically speaking, the first two of these are ketones, while the third isnt, it is considered a carboxylic acid ( 2 ). However, all three are considered ketone bodies, and the difference isnt relevant to this discussion. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketogenesis And What Are Ketone Bodies?

What Is Ketogenesis And What Are Ketone Bodies?

What Is Ketogenesis and What Are Ketone Bodies? With heavy coverage in the media, low carb and ketogenic diets are all the rage right now. And for a good reason; for some people, they truly work. But what do all these different terms like ketogenesis and ketone bodies actually mean? Firstly, this article takes a look at what the ketogenesis pathway is and what ketone bodies do. Following this, it will examine six potential health benefits of ketones and nutritional ketosis. Ketogenesis is a biochemical process through which the body breaks down fatty acids into ketone bodies (well come to those in a minute). Synthesis of ketone bodies through ketogenesis kicks in duringtimes of carbohydrate restriction or periods of fasting. When carbohydrate is in short supply, ketones become the default energy source for our body. As a result, a diet to induce ketogenesis should ideally restrict carb intake to a maximum of around 50 grams per day ( 1 , 2 ). Ketogenesis may also occur at slightly higher levels of carbohydrate intake. When ketogenesis takes place, the body produces ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose. This physiological state is known as nutritional ketosis the often default state of people following ketogenic diets. There are various methods you can use to test if you are in ketosis . Key Point: Ketogenesis is a biological pathway that breaks fats down into a form of energy called ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are water-soluble compounds that act as a form of energy in the body. There are three major types of ketone body; Acetone (a compound created through the breakdown of acetoacetate) The first thing to remember is that these ketones satisfy our bodys energy requirements in the same way that glucose does. However, unlike glucose, ketone bodies haveno imp Continue reading >>

Acetone As Biomarker For Ketosis Buildup Capability - A Study In Healthy Individuals Under Combined High Fat And Starvation Diets

Acetone As Biomarker For Ketosis Buildup Capability - A Study In Healthy Individuals Under Combined High Fat And Starvation Diets

N2 - Background: Ketogenic diets are high fat and low carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diets, which render high production of ketones upon consumption known as nutritional ketosis (NK). Ketosis is also produced during fasting periods, which is known as fasting ketosis (FK). Recently, the combinations of NK and FK, as well as NK alone, have been used as resources for weight loss management and treatment of epilepsy. Methods: A crossover study design was applied to 11 healthy individuals, who maintained moderately sedentary lifestyle, and consumed three types of diet randomly assigned over a three-week period. All participants completed the diets in a randomized and counterbalanced fashion. Each weekly diet protocol included three phases: Phase 1 - A mixed diet with ratio of fat: (carbohydrate+protein) by mass of 0.18 or the equivalence of 29% energy from fat from Day 1 to Day 5. Phase 2- A mixed or a high-fat diet with ratio of fat: (carbohydrate+protein) by mass of approximately 0.18, 1.63, or 3.80 on Day 6 or the equivalence of 29%, 79%, or 90% energy from fat, respectively. Phase 3 - A fasting diet with no calorie intake on Day 7. Caloric intake from diets on Day 1 to Day 6 was equal to each individual's energy expenditure. On Day 7, ketone buildup from FK was measured. Results: A statistically significant effect of Phase 2 (Day 6) diet was found on FK of Day 7, as indicated by repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), F(2,20)=6.73, p<0.0058. Using a Fisher LDS pair-wise comparison, higher significant levels of acetone buildup were found for diets with 79% fat content and 90% fat content vs. 29% fat content (with p=0.00159, and 0.04435, respectively), with no significant difference between diets with 79% fat content and 90% fat content. In addition, independent of Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

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