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Difference Between Lactic Acidosis And Ketoacidosis

Acid/base Disorders: Metabolic Acidosis

Acid/base Disorders: Metabolic Acidosis

Are there clinical practice guidelines to inform decision-making? Does this patient have metabolic acidosis? Metabolic acidosis is generally defined by the presence of a low serum bicarbonate concentration (normal range 22-28 mEq/L), although occasionally states can exist where the serum bicarbonate is normal with an elevated anion gap (e.g., patients with a lactic acidosis who have received a bicarbonate infusion or patients on hemodialysis). In general, a metabolic acidosis is associated with a low urine pH but depending on the presence or absence of a respiratory alkalosis, this may also be normal or elevated. Thus, a patient can have an acidosis but not be acidemic. Metabolic acidoses occur when there is excess acid in the plasma. In the basal state, the body generates about 12,000 to 13,000 mmol of carbon dioxide (CO2), and 1-1.5 mmol per kilogram body weight of nonvolatile acid. The body has a large buffering capacity, with CO2-HCO3 as the major buffer system. The two major routes of acid excretion are the lungs (for CO2) and the kidneys (for nonvolatile acids) A metabolic acidosis can be caused by three major mechanisms: 1) increased acid production; 2) bicarbonate loss; and 3) decreased renal acid excretion Increased acid production leads to anion-gap (AG) metabolic acidosis, and involves a variety of different clinical processes, see An anion gap acidosis may also result for ingestion of an acid load. Both bicarbonate loss and decreased renal acid excretion lead to normal-anion gap (NG) metabolic acidosis. When there is HCO3 loss, chloride is retained to maintain electrical neutrality. The different clinical processes are summarized in Toxic ingestions are common causes of AG metabolic acidosis. The commonest causes are methanol and ethylene glycol intoxicatio Continue reading >>

Fluid Management In Diabetic-acidosis—ringer's Lactate Versus Normal Saline: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Fluid Management In Diabetic-acidosis—ringer's Lactate Versus Normal Saline: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Objective: To determine if Ringer's lactate is superior to 0.9% sodium chloride solution for resolution of acidosis in the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design: Parallel double blind randomized controlled trial. Methods: Patients presenting with DKA at Kalafong and Steve Biko Academic hospitals were recruited for inclusion in this study if they were >18 years of age, had a venous pH >6.9 and ≤7.2, a blood glucose of >13 mmol/l and had urine ketones of ≥2+. All patients had to be alert enough to give informed consent and should have received <1 l of resuscitation fluid prior to enrolment. Results: Fifty-seven patients were randomly allocated, 29 were allocated to receive 0.9% sodium chloride solution and 28 to receive Ringer's lactate (of which 27 were included in the analysis in each group). An adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis was done to compare the time to normalization of pH between the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and Ringer's lactate groups. The hazard ratio (Ringer's compared with 0.9% sodium chloride solution) for time to venous pH normalization (pH = 7.32) was 1.863 (95% CI 0.937–3.705, P = 0.076). The median time to reach a pH of 7.32 for the 0.9% sodium chloride solution group was 683 min (95% CI 378–988) (IQR: 435–1095 min) and for Ringer's lactate solution 540 min (95% CI 184–896, P = 0.251). The unadjusted time to lower blood glucose to 14 mmol/l was significantly longer in the Ringer's lactate solution group (410 min, IQR: 240–540) than the 0.9% sodium chloride solution group (300 min, IQR: 235–420, P = 0.044). No difference could be demonstrated between the Ringer's lactate and 0.9% sodium chloride solution groups in the time to resolution of DKA (based on the ADA criteria) (unadjusted: P = 0.934, adjusted: P = 0.75 Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis - Today's Pearl - Statpearls

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis - Today's Pearl - Statpearls

High anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) is a subcategory of acidosis ofmetabolic (i.e., non-respiratory) etiology. Differentiation of acidosis into a particular subtype, whether high anion gap metabolic acidosisor non-aniongap metabolic acidosis(NAGMA), aids in the determinationof the etiology and hence appropriate treatment. Although there have been many broadly inclusive mnemonic devices for high anion gap metabolic acidosis, the use of "GOLD MARK" has gained popularity for its focus on causes common to the 21st century. Glycols (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol) Oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid, the toxic metabolite of excessive acetaminophen or paracetamol) L-Lactate (standard lactic acid seen in lactic acidosis) D-Lactate (exogenous lactic acid produced by gut bacteria) Methanol (this is inclusive of alcohols in general) Ketones (diabetic, alcoholic and starvation ketosis) Of note, metformin has been omitted from this list due to a lack of evidence for metformin-induced lactic acidosis. In fact, aCochrane review found substantial evidence that metformin was not a cause of lactic acidosis. The same could not be said ofthe older biguanide, phenformin, which does increase the incidence of lactic acidosis by approximately tenfold. Furthermore, the addition of massive rhabdomyolysis would be appropriate given the potentially large amounts of hydrogen ions released by muscle breakdown. High anion gap metabolic acidosis is one of the most common metabolic derangements seen in critical care patients. Exact numbers are not readily available. The most common method of evaluation of metabolic acidosis involves the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and the Lewis model interpretation of biological acidosis which evaluates the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions. An alternative Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Lactate levels greater than 2 mmol/L represent hyperlactatemia, whereas lactic acidosis is generally defined as a serum lactate concentration above 4 mmol/L. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients. Although the acidosis is usually associated with an elevated anion gap, moderately increased lactate levels can be observed with a normal anion gap (especially if hypoalbuminemia exists and the anion gap is not appropriately corrected). When lactic acidosis exists as an isolated acid-base disturbance, the arterial pH is reduced. However, other coexisting disorders can raise the pH into the normal range or even generate an elevated pH. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis", section on 'Assessment of the serum anion gap' and "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders".) Lactic acidosis occurs when lactic acid production exceeds lactic acid clearance. The increase in lactate production is usually caused by impaired tissue oxygenation, either from decreased oxygen delivery or a defect in mitochondrial oxygen utilization. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis".) The pathophysiology and causes of lactic acidosis will be reviewed here. The possible role of bicarbonate therapy in such patients is discussed separately. (See "Bicarbonate therapy in lactic acidosis".) PATHOPHYSIOLOGY A review of the biochemistry of lactate generation and metabolism is important in understanding the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis [1]. Both overproduction and reduced metabolism of lactate appear to be operative in most patients. Cellular lactate generation is influenced by the "redox state" of the cell. The redox state in the cellular cytoplasm is reflected by the ratio of oxidized and reduced nicotine ad Continue reading >>

Common Laboratory (lab) Values - Abgs

Common Laboratory (lab) Values - Abgs

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Laboratory VALUES Home Page Arterial Blood Gases Arterial blood gas analysis provides information on the following: 1] Oxygenation of blood through gas exchange in the lungs. 2] Carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination through respiration. 3] Acid-base balance or imbalance in extra-cellular fluid (ECF). Normal Blood Gases Arterial Venous pH 7.35 - 7.45 7.32 - 7.42 Not a gas, but a measurement of acidity or alkalinity, based on the hydrogen (H+) ions present. The pH of a solution is equal to the negative log of the hydrogen ion concentration in that solution: pH = - log [H+]. PaO2 80 to 100 mm Hg. 28 - 48 mm Hg The partial pressure of oxygen that is dissolved in arterial blood. New Born – Acceptable range 40-70 mm Hg. Elderly: Subtract 1 mm Hg from the minimal 80 mm Hg level for every year over 60 years of age: 80 - (age- 60) (Note: up to age 90) HCO3 22 to 26 mEq/liter (21–28 mEq/L) 19 to 25 mEq/liter The calculated value of the amount of bicarbonate in the bloodstream. Not a blood gas but the anion of carbonic acid. PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg 38-52 mm Hg The amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in arterial blood. Measured. Partial pressure of arterial CO2. (Note: Large A= alveolor CO2). CO2 is called a “volatile acid” because it can combine reversibly with H2O to yield a strongly acidic H+ ion and a weak basic bicarbonate ion (HCO3 -) according to the following equation: CO2 + H2O <--- --> H+ + HCO3 B.E. –2 to +2 mEq/liter Other sources: normal reference range is between -5 to +3. The base excess indicates the amount of excess or insufficient level of bicarbonate in the system. (A negative base excess indicates a base deficit in the blood.) A negative base excess is equivalent to an acid excess. A value outside of the normal r Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis, Hyperlactatemia And Sepsis | Montagnani | Italian Journal Of Medicine

Lactic Acidosis, Hyperlactatemia And Sepsis | Montagnani | Italian Journal Of Medicine

Montagnani and Nardi: Lactic Acidosis, Hyperlactatemia and Sepsis Lactic Acidosis, Hyperlactatemia and Sepsis [1] Division of Internal Medicine, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto [2] Division of Internal Medicine, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy Correspondence to: Ospedale Misericordia di Grosseto, via Senese, 58100 Grosseto, Italy. +39.0564.485330. [email protected] Among hospitalized patients, lactic acidosis represents the most common cause of metabolic acidosis. Lactate is not just a metabolic product of anaerobic glycolysis but is triggered by a variety of metabolites even before the onset of anaerobic metabolism as part of an adaptive response to a hypermetabolic state. On the basis of such considerations, lactic acidosis is divided into two classes: inadequate tissue oxygenation (type A) and absence of tissue hypoxia (type B). Lactic acidosis is characterized by non-specific symptoms but it should be suspected in all critical patients who show hypovolemic, hypoxic, in septic or cardiogenic shock or if in the presence of an unexplained high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Lactic acidosis in sepsis and septic shock has traditionally been explained as a result of tissue hypoxia when whole-body oxygen delivery fails to meet whole body oxygen requirements. In sepsis lactate levels correlate with increased mortality with a poor prognostic threshold of 4 mmol/L. In hemodynamically stable patients with sepsis, hyperlactatemia might be the result of impaired lactate clearance rather than overproduction. In critically ill patients the speed at which hyperlactatemia resolves with appropriate therapy may be considered a useful prognostic indicator. The measure of blood lactate should be performed within 3 h of presentation in acute care setting. The presence of lactic a Continue reading >>

Measure Electrolyte And Ketone Levels And Determine Anion Gap In Patients With Diabetes And Normal Sugar Levels

Measure Electrolyte And Ketone Levels And Determine Anion Gap In Patients With Diabetes And Normal Sugar Levels

DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS DX: Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) when the blood glucose is >=250 mg/dL, arterial pH <=7.30, serum bicarbonate <=15 mEq/L, and positive serum ketones. (Hyperglycemia, ketonemia, ketonuria, metabolic acidosis) Screening for Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Consider DKA if hyperglycemia, acidosis, or ketonemia are present. Screen all patients with moderate to severely elevated blood sugars (glucose >350 mg/dL). Measure electrolytes, glucose, ketones, and blood gases to determine whether anion gap metabolic acidosis is present in patients with positive ketones, constitutional symptoms, or suspicion of DKA. in patients with an anion gap metabolic acidosis. Measure serum glucose in patients with metabolic acidosis. in diabetes patients with infection, CVA, MI, or other illness. Measure serum glucose and if glucose >250 mg/dL, check the patient's electrolyte and ketone levels and anion gap. in diabetic patients with symptoms of nausea and vomiting (with polyuria, polydipsia), even if blood glucose is <250 mg/dL. if symptoms suggest DKA despite normal blood sugar levels. in patients on atypical antipsychotics who present with hyperglycemia. Measure anion gap and ketones in patients on atypical antipsychotics who present with moderate to severe hyperglycemia. SX: Dehydration with hypotension, hyperventilation with fruity "acetone" odor, polyphagia, polydipsia, polyuria, altered mental status, N&V. History and Physical Examination Elements for Diabetic Ketoacidosis History Type 1 diabetes - DKA is a frequent complication of type 1 diabetes Constitutional symptoms - DKA may show vague symptoms of lethargy, diminished appetite, and headache Polyuria, polydipsia - May precede the development of DKA by 1 or 2 days, especially if intercurrent illness (infection) is present Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis; Gap Positive

Metabolic Acidosis; Gap Positive

Metabolic acidosis is defined by low serum pH (less than 7.35-7.45) and low serum bicarbonate. It occurs by one of three major mechanisms: 1. Increased endogenous acid (i.e., lactic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis). 2. Decreased renal acid excretion (i.e., renal failure). In determining the underlying etiology for a metabolic acidosis, the serum anion gap must be calculated by subtracting the major measured anions (chloride and bicarbonate) from the major measured cation (sodium). If the result is greater than 12 meq/L (which is the normal value for most laboratories), the acidosis is said to be an anion gap acidosis. The expected anion gap should is lower in hypoalbuminemia and should be corrected - for each decrease of 1gm/dl in albumin, the normal anion gap should be decreased by approximately 2.5 meq/L. A. What is the differential diagnosis for this problem? Anion gap acidosis can be the result from: 1. A fall in unmeasured cations (as seen in hypomagnesemia or hypocalcemia). The most common reasons for a rise in anions are ingestions, lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and renal failure. Ingestions of multiple different toxins can result in unmeasured anions causing a metabolic gap acidosis. Most commonly salicylate and the alcohols (methanol and ethylene glycol) can lead to severe acidosis. The inhalant toluene may also be a culprit. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of an elevated anion gap acidosis in hospitalized patients, occurring with decreased perfusion causing relative tissue ischemia. This leads to increased lactic acid production and impaired renal excretion with resultant acid accumulation (Type A lactic acidosis). Type B lactic acidosis occurs in patients without overt tissue and can be seen in diabetics on metformin, patients with hematologic and s Continue reading >>

Clinical Aspects Of The Anion Gap

Clinical Aspects Of The Anion Gap

The anion gap (AG) is a calculated parameter derived from measured serum/plasma electrolyte concentrations. The clinical value of this calculated parameter is the main focus of this article. Both increased and reduced anion gap have clinical significance, but the deviation from normal that has most clinical significance is increased anion gap associated with metabolic acidosis. This reflects the main clinical utility of the anion gap, which is to help in elucidating disturbances of acid-base balance. The article begins with a discussion of the concept of the anion gap, how it is calculated and issues surrounding the anion gap reference interval. CONCEPT OF THE ANION GAP - ITS DEFINITION AND CALCULATION Blood plasma is an aqueous (water) solution containing a plethora of chemical species including some that have a net electrical charge, the result of dissociation of salts and acids in the aqueous medium. Those that have a net positive charge are called cations and those with a net negative charge are called anions; collectively these electrically charged species are called ions. The law of electrochemical neutrality demands that, in common with all solutions, blood serum/plasma is electrochemically neutral so that the sum of the concentration of cations always equals the sum of the concentration of anions [1]. This immutable law is reflected in FIGURE 1, a graphic display of the concentration of the major ions normally present in plasma/serum. It is clear from this that quantitatively the most significant cation in plasma is sodium (Na+), and the most significant anions are chloride (Cl-) and bicarbonate HCO3-. The concentration of these three plasma constituents (sodium, chloride and bicarbonate) along with the cation potassium (K+) are routinely measured in the clinica Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Significance Of Lactic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Prevalence And Significance Of Lactic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at J Crit Care See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The prevalence and clinical significance of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are understudied. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of lactic acidosis in DKA and its association with intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) and mortality. Retrospective, observational study of patients with DKA presenting to the emergency department of an urban tertiary care hospital between January 2004 and June 2008. Sixty-eight patients with DKA who presented to the emergency department were included in the analysis. Of 68 patients, 46 (68%) had lactic acidosis (lactate, >2.5 mmol/L), and 27 (40%) of 68 had a high lactate (>4 mmol/L). The median lactate was 3.5 mmol/L (interquartile range, 3.324.12). There was no association between lactate and ICU LOS in a multivariable model controlling for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, glucose, and creatinine. Lactate correlated negatively with blood pressure (r = 0.44; P < .001) and positively with glucose (r = 0.34; P = .004). Lactic acidosis is more common in DKA than traditionally appreciated and is not associated with increased ICU LOS or mortality. The positive correlation of lactate with glucose raises the possibility that lactic acidosis in DKA may be due not only to hypoperfusion but also to altered glucose metabolism. Keywords: Diabetic ketoacidosis, Lactic acidosis, Diabetes, Acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus that occurs when circulating insulin levels are low or absent. This state is characterized by acidosis, hyperglycemia, and the presence of serum ketones. Diabetic ketoacido Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Acidosis

Ketosis & Acidosis

Ketosis occurs when the fat in your body does not break down completely, producing ketones. It's a condition that can occur when you go on a low-carb diet and glycogen stores in your liver are depleted. When you have too much acid in your system, you can develop acidosis. The acid build-up can take place in your kidneys or lungs for a variety of reasons. The build-up of ketones can cause an imbalance that leads to excessive acid production. Video of the Day Diabetics may be prone to ketosis or acidosis when insulin levels drop below healthy levels or when ketones build up in the body due to uncontrolled insulin levels. Ketones are the byproduct produced when the body relies primarily on fat stores for energy. While short-term ketosis can help you lose weight, ketones that continue to build up in your blood and urine are poisonous and lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, also referred to as diabetic acidosis. The condition is a more common complication of Type 1 diabetes. In addition to low insulin levels, trauma, severe infection, a heart attack or surgery can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic acidosis requires immediate medical attention. As insulin levels drop, your body produces blood sugar by uncontrollably burning fat. Your body turns acidic as glucose begins to appear in your urine. As your body tries to find a balance, your breathing becomes deeper and quicker, leading to a temporary balance as you blow off excess carbon dioxide. Symptoms may start with confusion, thirst, fatigue and increased urination. You may become unconscious. As acidosis progresses, you can smell acetone on your breath. Symptoms usually appear quickly, so you should seek emergency treatment. A high fat and high protein diet that's low in carbohydrates can lead to ketosis. At the same time, Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

The buildup of lactic acid in the bloodstream. This medical emergency most commonly results from oxygen deprivation in the body’s tissues, impaired liver function, respiratory failure, or cardiovascular disease. It can also be caused by a class of oral diabetes drugs called biguanides, which includes metformin (brand name Glucophage). Another biguanide called phenformin was pulled from the market in the United States in 1977 because of an unacceptably high rate of lactic acidosis associated with its use. Concerns about lactic acidosis also delayed the introduction of metformin to the U.S. market until 1995, despite the fact that it had been widely used for years in other countries. There have been reports of lactic acidosis occurring in people taking metformin, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration estimates that lactic acidosis occurs in 5 out of every 100,000 people who use metformin for any length of time. However, this risk is much lower than it was in people taking phenformin, and it is not clear whether the episodes of lactic acidosis associated with metformin have actually been due to metformin use. In fact, the lactic acidosis could have been explained by the person’s diabetes and related medical conditions. Nonetheless, diabetes experts recommend that metformin not be used in people with congestive heart failure, kidney disease, or liver disease. They also recommend that it be discontinued (at least temporarily) in people undergoing certain medical imaging tests called contrast studies. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include feeling very weak or tired or having unusual muscle pain or unusual stomach discomfort. Continue reading >>

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