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Diet Induced Acidosis

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

1. Clin Nutr. 2011 Aug;30(4):416-21. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2011.03.008. Epub 2011 Apr 9. (1)Hospital General Juan Cardona, c/ Pardo Bazn s/n 15406 Ferrol, La Corua, Spain. [email protected] The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and containsexcessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizableanions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitudeincreases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidneyfunction. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, thekidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance,such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate,and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammoniumions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation.Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease.Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable inpredicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the generalpopulation, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populationsincluding diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is morelikely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase thecardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm anassociation between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, Continue reading >>

Will The

Will The "acid/alkaline" Myth Ever Die ?

FollowFollowingUnfollowArnold Wiseman, LION (MR PALEO) Functional Nutritionist, Physical Fitness Specialist, Energy Intuitive, Qigong Healer This is not science, it is one of those popular concepts adopted as fact by the average person who either does not understand human biochemistry, or refuses to part with an ideology they have integrated as "truth" into their own personal paradigm... "Many of you have probably heard of the alkaline diet. There are a few different versions of the acid-alkaline theory circulating the internet, but the basic claim is that the foods we eat leave behind an ash after they are metabolized, and this ash can be acid or alkaline (alkaline meaning more basic on the pH scale). According to the theory, it is in our best interest to make sure we eat more alkaline foods than acid foods, so that we end up with an overall alkaline load on our body. This will supposedly protect us from the diseases of modern civilization, whereas eating a diet with a net acid load will make us vulnerable to everything from cancer to osteoporosis. To make sure we stay alkaline, they recommend keeping track of urine or saliva pH using handy pH test strips . In this two-part series, I will address the main claims made by proponents of the alkaline diet, and will hopefully clear up some confusion about what it all means for your health. Will eating an alkaline diet make you and your bones healthier? Before I start dismantling this theory, I want to acknowledge a couple things they get right. First, foods do leave behind acid or alkaline ash. The type of ash is determined by the relative content of acid-forming components such as phosphate and sulfur, and alkalis such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium. ( 1 , 2 ) In general, animal products and grains are acid forming, Continue reading >>

Diet Induced Acidosis: Is It Real And Clinically Relevant?

Diet Induced Acidosis: Is It Real And Clinically Relevant?

Association for the Advancement of Restorative Medicine Restoring Patient Wellness. Building Physician Practices. Diet Induced Acidosis: Is It Real and Clinically Relevant? The topic of acidosis has long been controversial, and has not yet gained acceptance by mainstream medicine. Some of the reasons for this may be because of the challenges in thoroughly understanding the complexity of the topic, the obstacles in testing serum acidity accurately, and then the challenges of proving it in research. Nonetheless, acidosis has been shown clinically to have a significant effect on health. In an article with the same title, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, Joseph Pizzorno, ND reviews relevant published research on the topic of physiological pH and its potential clinical significance. For the purposes of this article, acidosis refers to the net acid load of the diet, since pH is most significantly influenced by food. Acid excretion can be measured in the urine or calculated based on food intake. The Standard American Diet (SAD) is very acid-producing due to high levels of sodium chloride (salt) and low intake of base producing plant based foods. The conventional American diet is a shock to the human body, as compared to the diet of our ancestors which was mainly plant based and richer in base-producing potassium. The body requires a very tightly regulated pH of about 7.4 to maintain health. Numerous mechanisms are in place to correct deviation. The lungs and kidneys work together to excrete excessive acid (also excess base, a less likely scenario). pH can fluctuate momentarily, but the real problems come when the pH trends towards acid on a chronic basis, such as in the case of a consistent SAD diet. Beyond lungs and kidney, the bones act as reservoir of calcium Continue reading >>

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis And The Performance Of High Intensity Exercise In Man

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis And The Performance Of High Intensity Exercise In Man

, Volume 57, Issue5 , pp 583590 | Cite as Diet-induced metabolic acidosis and the performance of high intensity exercise in man The influence of four isolated periods of dietary manipulation upon high intensity exercise capacity was investigated in six healthy male subjects. Subjects consumed their normal (N) diet (452% carbohydrate (CHO), 413% fat, 143% protein) for four days after which they exercised to voluntary exhaustion at a workload equivalent to 100% \(\dot V_{{\text{O}}_{{\text{2 max}}} } \). Three further four-day periods of dietary manipulation took place; these were assigned in a randomised manner and each was followed by a high intensity exercise test. The dietary treatments were: a low CHO (31%), high fat (715%), high protein (263%) diet (HFHP); a high CHO (732%), low fat (122%), normal protein (151%) diet (HCLF); and a normal CHO (473%), low fat (272%), high protein (262%) diet (LFHP). Acid-base status and blood lactate concentration were measured on arterialised-venous blood at rest prior to dietary manipulation on each day of the different diets, immediately prior to exercise and at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 15 min post-exercise. Other metabolite concentrations were measured in the blood samples obtained prior to dietary manipulation and immediately prior to exercise. Exercise time to exhaustion after the HFHP diet (17963 s) was shorter when compared with the N (21065 s; p<0.01) and HCLF (21969 s; p<0.05) diets. Exercise time after the LFHP diet (18863 s) was also reduced when compared with the HCLF diet (p<0.05) but not significantly when compared with the N diet. Immediately prior to exercise after the HFHP diet plasma pH, bicarbonate, blood PCO2 and base excess levels were lower when compared with the N diet (p<0.05, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001 respectively), Continue reading >>

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis - Sciencedirect

Diet-induced Metabolic Acidosis - Sciencedirect

Get rights and content The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH. Continue reading >>

Diet-induced Acidosis: Is It Real And Clinically Relevant?

Diet-induced Acidosis: Is It Real And Clinically Relevant?

This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef . Krupp, DanikaEsche, JonasMensink, GertKlenow, StefanieThamm, MichaelandRemer, Thomas2018.Dietary Acid Load and Potassium Intake Associate with Blood Pressure and Hypertension Prevalence in a Representative Sample of the German Adult Population.Nutrients,Vol. 10,Issue. 1,p.103. View all Google Scholar citations for this article. Diet-induced acidosis: is it real and clinically relevant? 12 Moffitt CTSI Clinical Research Center, University of California The concept of diet-induced acidosis as a cause of disease has been a subject of interest for more than a century. The present article reviews the history of our evolving understanding of physiological pH, the physiological support for the concept of acidosis, the causes of acidosis, how it is recognised, its short-term effects as well as the long-term clinical relevance of preventative measures, and the research support for normalisation of pH. Further, we suggest differentiation of the terms acidosis and acidaemia as a way to resolve the conflation of these topics which has led to confusion and controversy. The available research makes a compelling case that diet-induced acidosis, not diet-induced acidaemia, is a real phenomenon, and has a significant, clinical, long-term pathophysiological effect that should be recognised and potentially counterbalanced by dietary means. To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure [email protected] is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the name part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindl Continue reading >>

Diet-induced Acidosis

Diet-induced Acidosis

Summary: Our bodies are in a state of constant motion. Even when were sleeping, the machinery of the body is at work. Metabolism is the chemical work within our cells that keeps us alive. We often speak of metabolism in relation to digestion and the process of turning the food we eat into energy, but metabolism involves much more. Metabolism is the process in which the chemical reactions within cells de-construct old cells and produce new ones. These chemical reactions also repair damage in tissues and cause growth. All this and much more goes on within our cells at a frenetic pace every moment of every day of our lives Rarely do we give these metabolic processes any thought. We eat , drink, work and play, thinking little about how our diet, thoughts and activities affect us on a cellular level. However, when disease strikes, we sometimes think about our cells and wonder what went wrong. One of the things that can go wrong is acidosis. Acidemia is the medical term given for blood that is too acidic. The commonly used term for acidic blood, though, is acidosis. Technically, acidosis refers to the process that causes blood to be acidic. Nevertheless, in this article, acidosis is the term that will be used. While there are a number of recognized medical conditions that cause different forms of acidosis, an important one to discuss is diet-induced acidosis. Although it is a common underlying condition and may be at the root of most illnesses and diseases, diet-induced acidosis is seldom tested for or addressed in medical treatment. A key element to understanding acidosis is pH. Why is pH so important to our health? Heres a brief explanation. The concentration of positive hydrogen ions in a substance is measured in pH units on a scale that goes from 0 to 14. The pH of any s Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

What Is Acidosis? Acidosis Causes & Treatment | High Alkaline Diet

What Is Acidosis? Acidosis Causes & Treatment | High Alkaline Diet

DEFINITION: Acidosis is an increased acidity in the blood and other body tissue. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35. The pH level of our blood affects every cell in our body. Chronic acidosis corrodes body tissue, and if left unchecked, will interrupt all cellular activities and functions. HIGH ACID-FORMING FOODS and DIETS all lead to ACIDOSIS. Living a fast-paced daily lifestyle, such as eating on the run, will lead people to face constant symptoms of indigestion and growing endangerment of over-acidification (Acidosis) of the body cells, which will interrupt cellular activities and functions. It is a major root of sickness and disease. Having our cells constantly exposed to an acidic environment leads to acidosis and then chronic acidosis and, finally, various forms of disease such as cancer and many more! Studies have shown that an acidic, anaerobic (which is also the lack of oxygen) body environment encourages the breeding of fungus, mold, bacteria, and viruses. As a result, our inner biological terrain shifts from a healthy oxygenated, alkaline environment to an unhealthy acidic one (acidic pH scale). This forces the body to constantly deplete its cellular energy to neutralize and detoxify these acids before they can act as poisons in and around the cells, ultimately changing the environment of each cell and finally compromising its immune system, leaving it vulnerable to the ravages of disease to take a foothold in the body. When our body pH becomes overly acidic, it starts to set up defense mechanisms to keep the damaging acids from entering the vital organs. Modern Day Athletes and Acid-Forming Foods Unfortunately, Modern Day Athletes and/or Non-Athletes have been raised in a fast food environment that is more concerned about convenienc Continue reading >>

Body Ph 101 Health Risks Of Acidosis And How To Alkalize Your Body

Body Ph 101 Health Risks Of Acidosis And How To Alkalize Your Body

What is pH Balance and What is Normal in Humans? A pH number measures between 0 14 and tells us how acidic or alkaline a liquid is. Liquids that measure below 7 are acidic and numbers above 7 are said to be alkaline. Normal body pH levels in humans range between 7.35 to 7.45, so our blood is slightly alkaline. You all know that your body has an optimal temperature of 98.6 degrees. but did you know it also has an optimal pH level? And just as the smallest deviation in your bodys temperature can lead to peril, so can a slight imbalance of the pH levels in your blood. Alkalinity, Weight Loss, and Energy Tony Robbins, Life Coach and Creator of Living Health While some have theorized, such as Michael Lam (referenced above) that water and pollution lead to acidosis, while this may very well be true, the vast majority of scientists blame the evolution of the Western diet (lots of meat & carbs, fewer fruits and veggies) as the primary cause for the prevalence of acidity in humans. Our ancestors were thought to have eaten more of a plant-based diet (alkaline), and tended to stay away from coffee, pizza, and alcohol, which are highly acidic. As Dr. Pizzorno stated in his aforementioned publication: With an increasing understanding of acidbase chemistry has come recognition of the significant differences between contemporary diets and diets more typical of Homo sapiens ancestors. Although of course we do not know exactly what our hominid ancestors ate, studies in huntergatherer tribes suggest a relatively high intake of plant foods compared with modern-day humans. In a recent study estimating the net acid load (NEAP) of 159 hypothetical pre-agricultural diets, 87 % were found to be base producing, with an estimated mean NEAP of negative 88 mEq/d. In comparison, calculations from Continue reading >>

Jasn | Mobile

Jasn | Mobile

Advanced Technology for Transplantation, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan; Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Molecular Life Sciences and Department of Pediatrics, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa, Japan; and Department of Nephrology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Dr. Yoshitsugu Takabatake, Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Box D11, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 585-0871, Japan. Email: [email protected] Accepted for publication November 7, 2016. Excessive fat intake contributes to the progression of metabolic diseases via cellular injury and inflammation, a process termed lipotoxicity. Here, we investigated the role of lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagic flux in the pathogenesis of lipotoxicity in the kidney. In mice, a high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in an accumulation of phospholipids in enlarged lysosomes within kidney proximal tubular cells (PTCs). In isolated PTCs treated with palmitic acid, autophagic degradation activity progressively stagnated in association with impaired lysosomal acidification and excessive lipid accumulation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the accumulated lipids originated from cellular membranes. In mice with induced PTC-specific ablation of autophagy, PTCs of HFD-mice exhibited greater accumulation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates normally removed by autophagy than did PTCs of mice fed a normal diet. Furthermore, HFD-mice had no capacity to augment autophagic activity upon another pathologic stress. Autophagy ablation also exaggerated HFD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammasome activation. Moreover, renal ischemia-reperfusion induced greater injury in HFD-mice than Continue reading >>

Metabolomics Reveals Protection Of Resveratrol In Diet-induced Metabolic Risk Factors In Abdominal Muscle

Metabolomics Reveals Protection Of Resveratrol In Diet-induced Metabolic Risk Factors In Abdominal Muscle

Metabolomics Reveals Protection of Resveratrol in Diet-Induced Metabolic Risk Factors in Abdominal Muscle Chen G.a Ye G.b,c Zhang X.d,e Liu X.f Tu Y.g Ye Z.h,i Liu J.a Guo Q.j Wang Z.k Wang L.f Dong S.b,c Fan Y.a,d aCollege of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University-Daqing, Daqing, China bKey Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, China cCenter for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, China dVascular Biology and Therapeutics Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA eIntegrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism Program, Department of Comparative Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA fDepartment of Pathology, Harbin Medical University-Daqing, Daqing, China gThe Department of Cardiology, the Second Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China hGuangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China iYale University School of Nursing, New Haven, CT, USA jSchool of Medicine, University of Jiangsu, Zhenjiang, China kExperimental Research Center, Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Bejing, China College of Pharmacy of Harbin Medical University-Daqing, Daqing, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China) E-Mail [email protected], [email protected], [email protected] Background/Aims: Abdominal obesity is recognized as the main reason of metabolic syndrome, which is closely related to disordered skeletal and/or abdominal muscle metabolic functions. Metabolomics is a comprehensive assessment system in biological metabolites. The aim of our present study is to investigate the diet-induced metabolic risk factors by metabolic in the abdomi Continue reading >>

Examining The Relationship Between Diet-induced Acidosis And Cancer

Examining The Relationship Between Diet-induced Acidosis And Cancer

Examining the relationship between diet-induced acidosis and cancer Robey; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2012 Increased cancer risk is associated with select dietary factors. Dietary lifestyles can alter systemic acid-base balance over time. Acidogenic diets, which are typically high in animal protein and salt and low in fruits and vegetables, can lead to a sub-clinical or low-grade state of metabolic acidosis. The relationship between diet and cancer risk prompts questions about the role of acidosis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Cancer is triggered by genetic and epigenetic perturbations in the normal cell, but it has become clear that microenvironmental and systemic factors exert modifying effects on cancer cell development. While there are no studies showing a direct link between diet-induced acidosis and cancer, acid-base disequilibrium has been shown to modulate molecular activity including adrenal glucocorticoid, insulin growth factor (IGF-1), and adipocyte cytokine signaling, dysregulated cellular metabolism, and osteoclast activation, which may serve as intermediary or downstream effectors of carcinogenesis or tumor promotion. In short, diet-induced acidosis may influence molecular activities at the cellular level that promote carcinogenesis or tumor progression. This review defines the relationship between dietary lifestyle and acid-base balance and discusses the potential consequences of diet-induced acidosis and cancer occurrence or progression. The relationship between diet and cancer is well known [ 1 3 ]. Dietary intake exists as the largest external or environmental epigenetic factor capable of driving the development or maintenance of cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) comprehensive global report has compiled numerous Continue reading >>

Experimental Research Effect Of Experimentally Induced Metabolic Acidosis On Aortic Endothelial Permeability And Serum Nitric Oxide Concentration In Normal And High-cholesterol Fed Rabbits

Experimental Research Effect Of Experimentally Induced Metabolic Acidosis On Aortic Endothelial Permeability And Serum Nitric Oxide Concentration In Normal And High-cholesterol Fed Rabbits

Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero Khazaei M, Nematbakhsh M. Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits. Archives of Medical Science. 2012;8(4):719-723. doi:10.5114/aoms.2012.30296. Khazaei, M., & Nematbakhsh, M. (2012). Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits. Archives of Medical Science, 8(4), 719-723. Khazaei, Majid, and Mehdi Nematbakhsh. 2012. "Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits". Archives of Medical Science 8 (4): 719-723. doi:10.5114/aoms.2012.30296. Khazaei, M., and Nematbakhsh, M. (2012). Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits. Archives of Medical Science, 8(4), pp.719-723. Khazaei, Majid et al. "Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits." Archives of Medical Science, vol. 8, no. 4, 2012, pp. 719-723. doi:10.5114/aoms.2012.30296. Khazaei M, Nematbakhsh M. Experimental researchEffect of experimentally induced metabolic acidosis on aortic endothelial permeability and serum nitric oxide concentration in normal and high-cholesterol fed rabbits. Archives of Medical Science. 2012;8(4):719-723. doi:10.5114/aoms.2012.30296. Introduc Continue reading >>

Failure Of Dietary-casein-induced Acidosis To Explain The Hypercholesterolemia Of Casein-fed Rabbits

Failure Of Dietary-casein-induced Acidosis To Explain The Hypercholesterolemia Of Casein-fed Rabbits

The partial replacement of casein by a mixture of gelatin, fish protein and soy protein in cholesterol-free semipurified diets of rabbits reduced the hypercholesterolemic response. The partial replacement of casein by the protein mixture also increased the feed intake and alleviated or reversed the weight loss observed from the casein diet. The data indicate that casein alone is not an ideal protein source for rabbits probably because of the imbalance of the amino acid composition. When KCl in the semipurified diets was replaced by KHCO3, a higher feed intake and a better growth were obtained, irrespective of the protein source in the diet. In addition, the feeding of semipurified diets containing KCl resulted in acidosis, which could be prevented by its replacement with KHCO3. A semipurified diet containing casein and KCl produced a more severe acidosis and higher serum cholesterol levels than the diet containing the protein mixture. Nevertheless, the correction of the acidosis by the replacement of KCl in the diet by KHCO3 did not lead to an abrogation of the casein-induced hypercholesterolemia. 1983 The American Institute of Nutrition Continue reading >>

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