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Diabetic Hypo

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycaemia or a "hypo", is where the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood drops too low. It mainly affects people with diabetes, especially if you take insulin. A low blood sugar can be dangerous if it's not treated promptly, but you can usually treat it easily yourself. Symptoms of low blood sugar A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody. You'll learn how it makes you feel if you keep getting it, although your symptoms may change over time. Early signs of a low blood sugar include: feeling hungry sweating tingling lips feeling shaky or trembling feeling tired becoming easily irritated, tearful, stroppy or moody turning pale If not treated, you may then get other symptoms, such as: weakness blurred vision difficulty concentrating unusual behaviour, slurred speech or clumsiness (like being drunk) feeling sleepy seizures (fits) collapsing or passing out Hypos can also occur while sleeping, which may wake you up during the night or cause headaches, tiredness or damp sheets (from sweat) in the morning. If you have a device to check your blood sugar level, a reading of less than 4mmol/L is too low and should be treated. Treatment for low blood sugar Treating a low blood sugar yourself Follow these steps if your blood sugar is less than 4mmol/L or you have hypo symptoms: Have a sugary drink or snack – try something like a small glass of non-diet fizzy drink or fruit juice, a small handful of sweets, or four or five dextrose tablets. Test your blood sugar after 10-15 minutes – if it's 4mmol or above and you feel better, move on to step 3. If it's still below 4mmol, treat again with a sugary drink or snack and take another reading in 10-15 minutes. Eat your main meal (containing carbohydrate) if you're about to have it or Continue reading >>

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers

False Hypo Symptoms: Diabetes Questions & Answers Q: I have had Type 1 diabetes for 40 years. Recently Ive been noticing low blood sugar feelings (glazed, unable to concentrate) even when my blood sugar levels are normal or high. Sometimes I even have ketones when this happens. Is this whats causing my symptoms? A: Symptoms of low blood glucose ( hypoglycemia ) tend to change over time. Most people who have had diabetes as long as you have lose the early warning signs (shaking, sweating, rapid heartbeat) and only experience cognitive (mental) symptoms, such as the ones you described. Interestingly, these types of symptoms can occur in different situations. Unusually high blood glucose, particularly when you dont spend a lot of time in a high range, can temporarily impair mental function and lead to tiredness, confusion, and mood changes. It is easy to confuse these with symptoms of hypoglycemia, so it is important to check your blood glucose whenever symptoms occur. You dont want to start popping glucose tablets when your blood glucose is 300 mg/dl (16.7 mmol/l). Another situation that can cause hypoglycemic symptoms is a rapid decline in blood glucose, such as falling from 300 (16.7) to 130 (7.2) within an hour. This may happen during intense exercise or when rapid-acting insulin is peaking. The rapid drop fools the brain into thinking that the blood glucose is low simply because it is coming down so fast. Since you mentioned ketones in your question, it is worth noting that the presence of ketones, with or without elevated glucose levels, can indicate a lack of insulin in the body, a lack of dietary carbohydrates or an infection that is causing intense insulin resistance. Regardless of the cause, ketones reflect a conversion from carbohydrate to fat metabolism, which Continue reading >>

Are You Being Treated With Glucose Lowering Tablets Called Sulphonylureas?

Are You Being Treated With Glucose Lowering Tablets Called Sulphonylureas?

Do you have diabetes? Are you being treated with insulin? (ask your pharmacist) Have you experienced any of the following symptoms during the day or night? Hypo symptoms You could be experiencing hypoglycaemia or ‘hypos’ (low blood glucose) What are hypos? Hypoglycaemia or hypos are when the glucose (also called sugars) in the blood falls to a low level below 4.0 mmol/l, whether you feel it or not What causes hypos? Hypos can have a number of causes. If your diabetes is being treated by insulin or tablets called sulphonylureas (ask your pharmacist), you might experience a hypo because of: Taking too much insulin Delayed or missed meals Not eating enough food containing carbohydrate (eg. bread, pasta, cereals) Exercising more than usual Breastfeeding Recreational drugs Check your blood glucose regularly Do not delay in treating your hypo Always carry food or a drink with you containing 15g of fast acting carbohydrate Carry a diabetes emergency card or bracelet Try not to skip meals Take your diabetes medication correctly Be extra careful when you are drinking alcohol Visit your doctor or nurse regularly to check your medication Why TALK hypos? Hypos are common and for some people with diabetes a fear of hypos is a big concern Despite this, research shows that people with diabetes don’t always talk about hypos with their doctor or nurse Having repeated hypos can lead to ‘hypo unawareness’ over time. This means that the warning symptoms of a hypo stop being felt, making them harder to identify and more difficult to manage Night-time hypos are common: around 6 in 10 people have experienced at least one night-time hypo in the previous month The symptoms of night-time hypos can include: waking up with a headache, poor sleep, tiredness, night sweats and having vivid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetes is a lifelong medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a chemical made by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach), which regulates the blood sugar (glucose) level in the body. Normally our bodies automatically keep the right blood sugar levels, but for someone with diabetes their body can't. Instead, they have to control the blood sugar level themselves by monitoring what they eat, and taking insulin injections or pills. There are two types of diabetes: Type1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar becomes either too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital. Watch our video - diabetic emergency Hyperglycaemia Too little insulin can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). If it’s not treated and gets worse, the person can gradually become unresponsive (going into a diabetic coma). So it's important to get them to see a doctor in case they need emergency treatment. Hypoglycaemia Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia (hypo). This often happens when someone with diabetes misses a meal or does too much exercise. It can also happen after someone has had an epileptic seizure or has been binge drinking. If someone knows they are diabetic, they may recognise the start of a hypo attack, but without help they may quickly become weak and unresponsive. What to look for - Diabetic emergency If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathin Continue reading >>

Managing A Hypo

Managing A Hypo

When your blood glucose level drops below 4mmol/L, this is called hypoglycaemia, or a ‘hypo’ for short. A hypo can be a scary thing for you to go through, but they can be managed effectively. There might be times when you have too much insulin in in your blood stream. This may be because you accidentally injected more than you needed, because you’ve been very active, because you haven’t eaten or you’ve had less carbohydrate than you thought. No matter the cause, find out how to manage hypos. What should I do during a hypo? Having a hypo can be a frightening experience. Symptoms are different for everyone (and you may not get any at all), but they may include: • Shaking • Sweating • Dizziness • Hunger • Blurred vision • Difficulty concentrating • Feeling anxious • Changes in behaviour If you feel like this, you should check your blood glucose level. If it is low you will need to eat or drink something that contains carbohydrate to bring your blood glucose back up into the normal level. How much carbohydrate you need will depend on how low your blood glucose has dropped but in general, one carbohydrate portion, or 15 grams of carbohydrate, will bring your blood glucose level up by about 3 mmol/L. That’s about 10 jelly babies, five glucose tablets, or 150ml of non-diet soft drink or fruit juice. The amount of carbohydrate you will need also depends on the time and the cause of your hypo – for example, if it’s after increased exercise or taking too much insulin, you may also need to eat a snack to prevent a further episode of hypoglycaemia. You should always check your blood glucose 10 to 15 minutes after you have treated your hypo. If your level is still low, you should eat a further 15 grams of carbohydrate and check again in 10 to 15 minut Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Hypoglycaemia means low blood glucose. In a person who doesn't have diabetes, levels of blood glucose don't fall much below 3.5 mmol becasue the body can stop and start the insulin it produces. If you have to inject insulin, it will carry on working even if your blood glusose drops too low. 'Hypo' is the comon name used for this drop in blood glucose levels. Eating or drinking quickly-absorbed carbohyfrates (sugary foods or drinks) can make the levels rise again. Symptoms of hypos When blood glucose levels begin to fall, the body usually triggers a number of 'warning signs' or hypo symptoms. Different people will experience different hypo symptoms, it can change from hypo to hypo, and your range of symptoms may also change as you get older. The ones that are usually described in medical textbooks include sweating, shaking, confusion and pallor (looking pale), but your hypos may give you different symptoms and you might not experience any of these. Some people become more irritable or easily upset when their blood sugar starts to drop. Some find it harder to concentrate, or to concentrate on more than one thing. Some people notice changes in the vision (for example, blurring or feeling as if you are in a tunnel). Everyone responds slightly differently to hypos, so it's useful to learn to recognise the symptoms that are relevant to your body. If the insulin in your body isn't matched with something sugary, and the blood glucose level continues to fall, you may lose consciousness. The young people we talked to said that their warning symptoms haven't changed that much over the years. They also indicated that you don't get all the symptoms at the same time. Many young people said that their parents are sometimes the first ones to notice that they are having a hypo. (See als Continue reading >>

Warning Symptoms Of Hypoglycaemia

Warning Symptoms Of Hypoglycaemia

What Is Hypoglycaemia? Back to Related Health Issues When the blood glucose levels start to drop at the stage of mild hypoglycaemia, then usually there are warnings signs/symptoms of the impending hypo. These are usually: Sweating Trembling Pallor Weakness Hunger These are called the adrenergic effects of hypoglycaemia because the body reacts to the low blood glucose level by the production of counter-regulatory hormones, mainly adrenalin and glucagon. These hormones are the ‘fight and flight’ hormones that the body releases when there is any danger. Hypoglycaemia is a danger and these hormones give the warning symptoms of an impending hypo and trigger the release glucose from the liver. If the mild hypo is not treated for any reason, then the blood glucose drops further and the symptoms of this are less obvious to the person with diabetes – the signs are usually: Confusion Irritability Behavioural changes such as aggression, excitement or violence Sensory changes such as blurred vision These symptoms are much harder to recognise and can be missed and so remain untreated. This can lead to a severe hypo and unconsciousness. These are the neuroglycopenic effects of hypoglycaemia because the blood glucose level has dropped to lower levels and the brain is starved of glucose. This results in reduced cognitive function with confusion and behavioural changes. The person who is hypo may well say that they are “definitely not hypo” but in reality this may be part of the confusion caused by the neuroglycopenia. Research has shown that brain function can be impaired when the blood glucose falls below 3.5mmols. Important to remember: The warning symptoms vary from person to person and can vary in the same person at different times. Many people have found that the warning Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gadget That Could End The ‘hypo’

Diabetes And The Gadget That Could End The ‘hypo’

“If I’ve had low blood sugar during the night, most of the next day is a write-off,” says Gareth Woodward. Like more than 200,000 people in the UK, 27-year-old Woodward has type 1 diabetes, where the patient’s immune system attacks the cells that make insulin. He must take regular insulin to manage his condition. If he takes too much, though, his blood sugar levels can fall, resulting in hypoglycemia, commonly known as a “hypo”. Woodward has hypos during the night up to twice a week, and about once a year, he will have severe hypoglycemia, meaning he requires help from someone else. A few of these have also ocurred at night. “I might notice him fidgeting, almost jumping around, and he’ll feel sweaty,” says his wife, Hannah. “I’ll try to wake him and if he doesn’t respond, I know he’s hypo. There have been times when I’ve had to call paramedics. It’s quite frightening.” Nights can be a particular worry if you have diabetes, but controlling blood glucose levels with insulin injections is a balancing act at any time of day. It requires constantly estimating dosage, largely based on carbohydrate intake and expenditure. No one wants a hypo, but high blood sugar is to be avoided too, because it can cause serious complications such as cardiovascular disease and kidney problems. Now, a new blood glucose monitoring device aims to make striking a balance much easier. The majority of people with type 1 diabetes in the UK test their blood around five times a day by pricking their finger and squeezing a drop on to a testing strip. The problem with that, says Pratik Choudhary, senior lecturer and consultant in diabetes at King’s College hospital in London, is that you never know what has happened between those tests. A new gadget, called the FreeStyl Continue reading >>

Hypos With Emergency Assistance – What Happens During A Diabetic Emergency?

Hypos With Emergency Assistance – What Happens During A Diabetic Emergency?

back to Overview Know-how Type 1 You're strolling home after a long day, you feel wiped out and pretty hungry. A quick meal and bumming around on the couch sounds perfect. At least that was the plan... But suddenly your brain screams 'hypo' and the next thing you know you wake up to strange people looking down at you. It's your worst nightmare; a low blood sugar that requires emergency assistance. If I’m too slow or get caught off guard Hypos make us feel lousy, shaky, and just bad. We often just want to feel better again! And most of the time, we can handle it ourselves with a bit of juice, glucose, or whatever we choose. But sometimes we might need a little help from friends, family, or co-workers. Even then, it’s usually not too bad. But what if we’re out alone and get caught off guard, or if the low happens too fast, and we lose our senses or pass out? What exactly happens while we’re “not there” to experience it? I was really curious, so I started asking some questions. Quick and effective help – usually I interviewed some first responders, paramedics, and firefighters here in Austria and asked them about their experiences helping us Monster Tamers. I’m sure there are many differences according to regional practices, licensing, and guidelines, but I think it’s still useful to share what I learned. What happens should you pass out is actually pretty uneventful, save the worry and concern of those around you. Hopefully someone sees that you need help and calls quickly. There is another article’s worth of discussion on this point alone, but for today, let’s assume rescue has been called and are on their way. In most populated areas, it shouldn’t take more than a few minutes for them to arrive. Medical ID Upon arrival, they will check if you are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Print Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin and not enough sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hypoglycemia is defined as blood sugar below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Several factors can cause hypoglycemia in people with diabetes, including taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications, skipping a meal, or exercising harder than usual. Pay attention to early warning signs, so you can treat low blood sugar promptly. Treatment involves short-term solutions — such as taking glucose tablets — to raise your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of consciousness — a medical emergency. Rarely, it can be deadly. Tell family and friends what symptoms to look for and what to do in case you're not able to treat the condition yourself. Symptoms Early warning signs and symptoms Early signs and symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Irritability or moodiness Anxiety or nervousness Headache Nighttime symptoms Diabetic hypoglycemia can also occur while you sleep. Signs and symptoms, which can awaken you, include: Damp sheets or bedclothes due to perspiration Nightmares Tiredness, irritability or confusion upon waking Severe symptoms If diabetic hypoglycemia goes untreated, signs and symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can occur. These include: Clumsiness or jerky movements Muscle weakness Difficulty speaking or slurred speech Blurry or double vision Drowsiness Confusion Convulsions or seizures Unconsciousness Death Take your symptoms seriously. Diabetic hypoglycemia can increase the risk of serious — even deadly — accidents. Identifying and correcting the factors contrib Continue reading >>

Hypo Hyper Diabetes | Diabetic Care Hypo | Management Of Hypos

Hypo Hyper Diabetes | Diabetic Care Hypo | Management Of Hypos

Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia occur when the body is unable to strike that delicate balance of blood glucose with food and activities. Even with the additional support of insulin injections it is easy to lose this balance. Hypoglycaemia is when blood glucose drops too low. Hyperglycaemia is when blood glucose rises too high. Diabeter can help treat and avoid these conditions. With a hypo (full: hypoglycemia) the blood sugar is too low. A hypo can occur because you eat too little, inject too much insulin or do a bodily effort for too long. Most times a hypo feels like feeling uneasy, but this is not always the case. Sometimes you don’t feel a hypo coming at all. In this case, somebody else catches on to what is happening to you before you do. Being tired Feeling hungry, shaking, sweating Seeing less Headache – feeling very warm or cold Mood swings, loss of concentration It is important to recognize a hypo timely. If not, ultimately there can be so little glucose available to the brain that it doesn’t function properly anymore. You can faint or even go into a coma. Therefore, the lack of sugar in the blood has to be supplemented as soon as possible with fast carbohydrates. Fructose (Dextro Energy) or lemonade syrup are very useful for this. Directly after that, you have to eat something, like a cake, a sandwich or a banana. Exercising or other bodily efforts are things best not to do if you have a hypo. Measure your blood glucose level again after fifteen minutes. Is it lower than 2,7 mmol/l, call our emergency line and you are immediately given advice by one of our doctors. The reverse of a hypo is a hyper (full: hyperglycemia). The blood sugar level is too high, which means above 11.1 mmol/l. A hyper can occur by eating too much, using no or too little insulin, s Continue reading >>

Having A Hypo | Diabetes Uk

Having A Hypo | Diabetes Uk

You must do something as soon as you notice symptoms of a hypo , or if a blood test has shown your blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar) are too low. If you dont act quickly, it could get worse and you could start feeling confused and drowsy. You could also become unconscious or have a fit. This is called a severe hypo , and you would need help to treat it. Treat the hypo immediately. You can do this by eating or drinking 15 to 20g of a fast-acting carbohydrate . This could be: a small glass of a sugary (non-diet) drink Which hypo treatment you choose is up to you. The type and amount depends on what works best for you. It might depend on your taste, or how easy it is to store or carry around. You can get things like glucose gel, glucose tablets and dextrose tablets on prescription. Talk to your diabetes team about this. They can give you advice about how much to take and which treatment to choose. If youre not sure how much carbohydrate is in a product, check the food label . It's important to check this often, as ingredients can change. From April 2017, Lucozade Energy Original will contain 50% lesssugar,so you will probably need to drink more of it to treat a hypo. For a period of time, there will be both old and new stock of Lucozade on sale, so its important to check the label before you buy. Ask your diabetes team for advice. We also have more information about the changes to sugar in food and drinks . After a hypo, you may need to eat or drink a bit more. This is to stop your sugar levels going down again. Try to eat 15 to 20g of a slower-acting carbohydrate. This could be a: Or it could be your next meal, if its due. If youre feeling too drowsy or confused to eat or drink, ask someone to help you. What to do when someone is having a severe hypo Its imp Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health consequences. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basis in people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. “Millimole per liter” (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, people’s blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels are rather uncommon for type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Signs of hyperglycemia People with type 2 diabetes do not always realize that their Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia, sometimes called a hypo or low, is a condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose level (BGL) has dropped too low, below 4mmol/L. It is important to treat a hypo quickly to stop the BGL from falling even lower and the person becoming seriously unwell. Hypoglycaemia can make it hard to concentrate and carry out everyday activities. Some activities, such as driving and operating machinery, are not safe if BGLs are less than 5.0mmol/L. Hypoglycaemia is much more common in people who take insulin or certain other glucose lowering tablets, however it can occur in people with diabetes who are not using insulin. Hypoglycaemia can be caused by one or a number of events, such as: Too much insulin or other glucose lowering diabetes tablets Delaying or missing a meal Not eating enough carbohydrate Unplanned physical activity* More strenuous exercise than usual* Drinking alcohol - the risk of hypoglycaemia increases, the more alcohol you drink *Hypoglycaemia may be delayed for 12 hours or more after exercise Symptoms of hypoglycaemia vary from person to person. Early signs and symptoms may include: Shaking, trembling or weakness Sweating Paleness Hunger Light headedness Headache Dizziness Pins and needles around mouth Mood change If the BGL continues to drop, more serious signs and symptoms may occur. Later signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia may include: Lack of concentration/ behaviour change Confusion Slurred speech Not able to treat own hypo Not able to drink or swallow Not able to follow instructions Loss of consciousness Fitting/seizures Hypoglycaemia can be classified as mild or severe. A mild hypo occurs when a person can treat their own hypo. A severe hypo occurs when a person needs help from someone else to treat their hypo. What should I do if I s Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

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