diabetestalk.net

Define Ketogenic

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

First, a simple explanation of the process: the carbohydrates you eat are converted to glucose, which is the body’s primary source of energy. Whenever your intake of carbohydrates is limited to a certain range, for a long enough period of time, you reach a point where your body draws on its alternate energy system, fat stores, for fuel. This means the body burns fat and turns it into a source of fuel called ketones. (Ketones are produced whenever body fat is burned.) When you burn a larger amount of fat than is immediately needed for energy, the excess ketones are discarded in the urine. Being in ketosis means your body has burned a large amount of fat in response to the fact that it didn’t have sufficient glucose available for energy needs. Dietary ketosis is among the most misunderstood concepts in nutrition because it is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening condition most often associated with uncontrolled insulin-deficient Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Dietary ketosis, however, is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. The most sensitive tests of ketosis (“NMR” and “blood ketone level”) show that everyone is in some degree of ketosis e Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

You may have heard the buzz about ketogenic diets—they are low in carbs and high in fat. This may sound very familiar to you, or, quite like Atkins. The difference is that Atkins has been around for 40 years, while ketogenic diets (or, rather, the term “ketogenic”) are relative newcomers to the low-carb world, but still follow the basic premises introduced and proven by Dr. Atkins years ago. In other words, a low-carb diet by any other name is still a low-carb diet. And there’s research that continues to back the efficacy of low-carb diets. In fact, I recently wrote about a study where 56% of 262 participants in a 10-week program consisting of a low-carb diet (30 grams of carbs or less a day) and health coaching were able to lower their blood glucose to pre-diabetes levels. And, in the last couple years, ketogenic diets have even taken Silicon Valley by storm, where numerous executives have become intrigued by the idea of “hacking” their metabolisms in the interest of improving their health. By tweaking the ratio of carbs, protein and fat that they consume (and eliminating the processed foods and sugars that lead to type-2 diabetes and contribute to our nation’s obesity problem) they start burning stored fat for fuel, instead of glucose (carbs). This metabolic state is also known as ketosis. The results? You reap the perks of stable energy levels and steady weight loss, and even improved athletic performance, plus the proven health benefits associated with a low-carb diet, such as managing or eliminating type-2 diabetes and reducing your risk for heart disease, and more. These are all things Atkins has stood the test of time ; now the word continues to spread. You truly are what you eat when you eat the right combination of high-fiber carbs, protein and fa Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? – Your Keto 101 Guide

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? – Your Keto 101 Guide

I’ll start with a quick answer to “what is the ketogenic diet?” before diving into the intricacies of this diet. Definition of Ketogenic Diet: The ketogenic diet (AKA keto diet, ketosis diet) is a low carbohydrate diet designed to put your body into the natural state of nutritional ketosis. When your body receives very few carbohydrates, it can’t use glucose to supply all your energy needs. So your body’s fat cells will be broken down in your liver to produce ketones (ketone bodies). Your body will then use those ketones for energy. In this article, I’ll go over some of the basics of a ketogenic diet like what do you eat, will you lose weight, how do you measure ketones. I’ll also reference other articles so that you can (if you want) go into more depth. Table of Contents – Keto 101 Guide There are several types of ketogenic diets… Many people consider a ketogenic diet (aka keto) a low carbohydrate diet like Atkins. Strictly speaking, while an Atkins diet can be ketogenic, it has traditionally emphasized different things. Atkins emphasizes low carbohydrates while keto emphasizes getting your body to have higher ketone levels. As the negative myths around eating fat have melted away in the past decade or so, high-fat diets (like the low carb high fat (LCHF) movement) have taken off. While keto is perhaps a stricter version of LCHF, in general, the foods we eat on both diets look very similar. There are also several other types of keto like the Cyclical Keto Diet or the Targeted Keto Diet. I’ll try to contain myself to just the basic keto diet in this article though. How much fat, protein, and carbohydrates do you eat on keto? The exact percentages and amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrates will differ depending on why you’re on a ketogenic diet. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

a condition in which there is excessive formation of ketones in the body Origin of ketosis Modern Latin from ket(o)- + -osis pl. ke·to·ses, A pathological increase in the production of ketone bodies. Related Forms: ke·tot′ic Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketogenic diets are very effective at achieving two common aims of diabetes control, lowering blood glucose levels and reducing weight What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, considered to be when you eat a level of carbohydrate of around 30g of carbohydrates per day or below. This encourages the body to get its energy from burning body fat which produces an energy source known as ketones. The diet helps to lower the body's demand for insulin which has benefits for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Note that it is important that you speak to your doctor if you are considering following the diet as precautions may need to be taken before starting. How a ketogenic diet works On a ketogenic diet, blood glucose levels are kept at a low but healthy level which encourages the body to break down fat into a fuel source known as ketones. The process of breaking down or ‘burning’ body fat is known as ketosis. People on insulin will typically require smaller doses of insulin which leads to less risk of large dosing errors. The diet helps burn body fat and therefore has particular advantages for those looking to lose weight, including people with prediabetes or those otherwise at risk of type 2 diabetes. How to follow a ketogenic diet Based on the understanding that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, the primary goal of a ketogenic diet is to keep consumption lower than that of a traditional low carbohydrate diet with moderate protein and a very high fat content. This will determine the nutrient density of the ketogenic diet as well as how to follow it, as different foods will have different effects on insulin and blood sugar levels. Which foods to eat on a ketogenic diet There are a number of differen Continue reading >>

Ketogenic

Ketogenic

Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Related to ketogenic: ketogenic diet ketogenic [ke″to-jen´ik] forming or capable of being converted into ketone bodies. Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. ke·to·gen·ic (kē-tō-jen'ik), Giving rise to ketone bodies in metabolism. ketogenic forming or capable of being converted into ketone bodies. Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content. Link to this page: ketogenic Continue reading >>

Beyond Weight Loss: A Review Of The Therapeutic Uses Of Very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) Diets

Beyond Weight Loss: A Review Of The Therapeutic Uses Of Very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) Diets

Very-low-carbohydrate diets or ketogenic diets have been in use since the 1920s as a therapy for epilepsy and can, in some cases, completely remove the need for medication. From the 1960s onwards they have become widely known as one of the most common methods for obesity treatment. Recent work over the last decade or so has provided evidence of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets in many pathological conditions, such as diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, acne, neurological diseases, cancer and the amelioration of respiratory and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The possibility that modifying food intake can be useful for reducing or eliminating pharmaceutical methods of treatment, which are often lifelong with significant side effects, calls for serious investigation. This review revisits the meaning of physiological ketosis in the light of this evidence and considers possible mechanisms for the therapeutic actions of the ketogenic diet on different diseases. The present review also questions whether there are still some preconceived ideas about ketogenic diets, which may be presenting unnecessary barriers to their use as therapeutic tools in the physician’s hand. During recent years, an increasing amount of evidence has accumulated in the literature, suggesting that very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (VLCKD) could have a therapeutic role in numerous diseases. The use of VLCKD in treating epilepsy has been well established for many decades and these diets have become even more widely known, as they became popular in the 1970s for weight loss—especially as the ‘Atkins Diet’.1 More recently, the therapeutic use of ketogenic diets in other diseases has been studied with positive results—it is an important direction for research because, clearly, Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Diet

What Is The Keto Diet

Low-carb diets, rather known as ketogenic diets have struck controversy for ages. In a review published in 2014, the research on the strategies for weight loss rated ketogenic diets as the most studied measure that has been taken by organizations all around the world. This study was done as a means to prove that this type of nutritional approach has a solid biochemical and physiological basis and can effectively induce weight loss and bring about significant improvements in a number of cardiovascular risk parameters. Low-carb diets were initially demonized by the media and a number of fat-phobic heath experts. The mindset that people had is that these diets were likely to cause heart disease by raising cholesterol due to the high percentage of fat. Withal, times are changing and people are now embracing them for the wide array of benefits they come with. Scientific research findings clearly reveal that low-carb diets are more beneficial than harmful to the human body. Not only do these diets facilitate weight loss, they have also led to greater improvements in several risk factors, including cholesterol. What is the Keto Diet. Here is your answer to what is the Keto Diet. A ketogenic diet is a diet plan that insists on cutting down a significant percentage of carbohydrates or actually getting rid of it from your diet. In the 1920s, it was designed for epileptic patients by researchers who apparently found out that fasting helped to reduce the amount of seizures suffered by the patients. This also had other positive effects on cholesterol, blood sugar, body fat and hunger levels. However, long-term fasting isn’t exactly a feasible option for longer than a few days which is why a divisive diet plan had to be designed as an alternative, hence ketogenic diets. The low-car Continue reading >>

Timed Ketogenic Diet

Timed Ketogenic Diet

The superior and modified version of the Atkins Diet that actually has no ties with the Atkins Diet, although the principles of the timed ketogenic diet are almost the same, with a few very important differences. The goal of the Atkins Diet is for dieters to reach the borderline state of ketosisor actual ketosis (not sure which one, so don't take me up on this word for word) within the body, which is a state where fat is the sole source of fuel burned by the body. Thus, fat is burned 24/7 in the absence of carbs. However, the consequences of the Atkins Diet far outweigh the short-term benefits. Problem 1: Some (not all) Atkins dieters restrict their calories far too much. This triggers "starvation mode" in the body, forcing the body to actually slow down its metabolism in order to save calories. THE SOLUTION: Rather than drop your calories by 1000 or 1500 below your normal caloric intake, you should only drop by 500 below normal for each day. So if my normal caloric intake is 2800 calories in order to stay the same weight I am now, I would drop the calories only subtly. A 500-calorie drop is not severe enough to trigger the "starvation" signal in the body, so you're safe. So, in my case, I would take in only 2300 calories per day to consistently lose weight. Now, keep in mind, this approach means slower weight loss, but it is a healthier AND permanent weight loss. Because you won't feel like you're starving every waking moment, you won't crave so much either. The golden rule is to lose 1-2 pounds a week. If you're losing 3 or more pounds weekly, like Atkins dieters do, you're probably losing weight in muscle too, which is bad, because with less muscle comes a slower metabolism. Problem 2: Some (not all) Atkins dieters think the diet by itself is the way to go. Actually, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits. Make keto simple and easy by checking out our 30 Day Meal Plan. Get meal plans, shopping lists, and much more with our Keto Academy Program. Looking for Something Specific? There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical appl Continue reading >>

More in ketosis