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Cvs Ketone Strips

A New Toy Measuring Blood Ketones

A New Toy Measuring Blood Ketones

I just got a new toy: a device for measuring blood ketones. This is a far more exact and reliable measurement than testing for urine ketones using cheap dipsticks. Ketosis is of course the state the body is in when eating very low carb. Ketones, made from fat, will then fuel the brain instead of glucose. So who needs one of these gadgets? Perhaps nobody. Obviously it’s easy to eat LCHF without it. This is for curious nerds (like me) and for those who want definite proof that they are eating so little carbs that insulin levels are low and fat burning is maximized. A ketone level somewhere between 1.5 – 3 is said to be an optimal level for maximizing weight loss. It means that insulin levels are very low. As you can see my first measurement was 0.2, after a caesar sallad dinner. I’m not surprised as I’ve probably eaten at least 50 grams of carbs a day lately. I will try it out fasting in the mornings during the coming days. Perhaps I’ll try being really strict with the carbs for a while to see what happens. Have you tried one of these or are you interested in doing it? Continue reading >>

Jimmy Moore’s N=1 Experiments: Nutritional Ketosis Day 1-30

Jimmy Moore’s N=1 Experiments: Nutritional Ketosis Day 1-30

Before I went on the 2012 Low-Carb Cruise last month, I started reading a book that my low-carb research friends Dr. Jeff Volek and Dr. Steve Phinney had written as a follow-up to their fantastic 2011 release The Art And Science of Low Carbohydrate Living (listen to my interview with Dr. Phinney about this book in Episode 479 of “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show”). The sequel is called The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance and was written specifically to share the latest science behind ketogenic diets for athletes who are keenly interested in optimizing their exercise performance with fat and ketones serving as their body’s primary fuel source once they reach what Dr. Phinney refers to as “keto-adaptation.” But the information these low-carb stalwarts provide in this handy dandy little book goes much deeper than that as you will read about in this blog post. Most low-carbers have traditionally been using urine ketone sticks under the brand name Ketostix to measure their level of ketones being produced by color (from pink to dark purple) as a result of their low-carb diet. But as I previously shared in this YouTube video, this can be a frustratingly inaccurate way of measuring whether you are producing enough ketones in your blood to see the kind of results you are hoping for on your low-carb lifestyle change. But thanks to the cutting-edge information provided by Volek and Phinney in The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance, we now have a new and better way to measure the actual ketones that are in your blood which determines whether you have become keto-adapted and burning fat and ketones for fuel. They refer to getting into this state as “nutritional ketosis” to obviously distinguish it from ketoacidosis which is only an issue Continue reading >>

How Long Did It Take Ketostix To Start Working For You? Did They Work Well For You? Do You Still Use Them Regularly?

How Long Did It Take Ketostix To Start Working For You? Did They Work Well For You? Do You Still Use Them Regularly?

I recently bought some ketone detecting strips. (This brand.) I'm toying with using them regularly as an accountability tool in keeping my carbs low. I'd like to hear more about folks' use of Ketostix or other ketone detecting strips. My main points of curiosity: 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Do you have a favorite/least favorite brand? Where did you find the best deal? Did you need to eat zero-carb or just low-carb to see the strips change? How many hours/days of low- or zero-carb eating did it take for the strips to start changing? How many grams of carbs have you eaten in the past which resulted in the ketone detecting strips reversing color (indicating that you're out of ketosis)? Do you use them only occasionally or all the time? If all the time, do you test multiple times daily? In other words, do Ketostix (or ketone detecting strips) work for you, and if so, how do you put them to work for you? Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Testing

Urine Glucose Testing

General concept Accuracy Limitations of urine test strips Barney's example (potentially fatal mistake) A little humor How urine glucose testing works Many vets recommend urine glucose testing as a method of monitoring your pet's diabetes at home. It is simple and inexpensive. But it has some serious limitations that must be understood and taken into consideration. Urine glucose testing is based on the fact that excessive amounts of glucose in the blood will be filtered by the kidneys into the urine. Once the amount of glucose in the blood exceeds the renal threshold (180 mg/dL) , glucose is spilled into the urine. The renal threshold is the level at the kidneys can not "process" any more blood glucose and it spills into the urine. If the blood glucose is high for an extended period of time, glucose is usually present in the urine. The amount of glucose present in the urine depends on how high the blood glucose was, and how long the blood glucose was high. Urine glucose test strips like the pictures shown below are used. The test strip has a little test area at the end that is dipped into urine or held in the urine stream. After a certain amount of time, the color of the test area is compared to a reference color chart. Bayer makes several types of urine tests strips. Diastix and Clinistix test only for urine glucose. Keto-Diastix test for both glucose and ketones. The Diastix have more "levels" of glucose measurement than the Clinistix. Follow the instructions that come with your test strips, and use the reference color chart on the bottle or box. The picture shown below is just an example - the colors are NOT to be used to compare your urine test strip. The color chart tells you approximately how much glucose has spilled into your pet's urine. Note: Different test stri Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

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