diabetestalk.net

Constant Diarrhea On Keto

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

The Ketogenic diet pretty much goes against everything you've been told about dieting I'm extremely surprised by the results and how amazing I feel... I dropped 12 pounds in 6 weeks and lost about 3% body-fat (21% to 18%) and gained strength at the gym. All the bloating I used to have when clean eating went away, I have more energy and my hunger went down so much that I sometimes force myself to reach my 1500 calories per day. So even if it was hard getting into it at first, I though some of you would like to know about it! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Keto is a very low-carbohydrates, high-fat, adequate protein diet. The Ketogenic diet is almost 100 yeard old, it was use as a treatment for the epileptic patients in the 1920 and 1930s: How does the Ketogenic Diet work? When you drastically limit your carbohydrates intake, your body can longer rely on it as its main source of energy, fat will become your new main source of energy which also includes your body fat. When using fat as energy, your body will first break it into Ketones. When your Ketones level is higher than normal (meaning you're burning fat), you are in a state of Ketosis. 1. The Ketogenic Diet helps you lose body-fat, bad cholesterol and preservers your lean body mass! If you want to lose fat, this is the best way to do so. The reason for this is that when you're on a normal glycolytic metabolism, fat is considered as a backup fuel by your body and is only used as a last resort. On a "default metabolic state", if your body needs energy it will : First look for glucose in your blood-stream; If no glucose is found it will try to convert the glycogen in your liver into glucose; If no glycogen is found, it will break down MUSCLES and fat (fat being the very last option). Under Ketosis, fat is the first option! Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Cure Candida? The Ketosis-candida-mercury Link

Does The Ketogenic Diet Cure Candida? The Ketosis-candida-mercury Link

You’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for a while now and you’ve been promised weight loss, more energy, clearer head, better sleep or possibly even ascension? But instead you got some or all of the following? weight gain stiff neck fatigue brain fog heart palpitations head pressure burning sensation in the mouth insatiable thirst impaired breathing / coughing / shortness of breath headaches nausea stiff joints muscle stiffness depression insomnia rash bloated, painful intestines constipation or diarrhea white coated tongue phlegm or mucus or the feeling of having a “frog” in your throat just overall feeling more miserable But you aren’t willing to give up on the diet just yet because you were told all those negative symptoms you’ve started to experience were due to your body adjusting from a sugar to a fat burning metabolism? Or that your mtDNA was being repaired? That you just need to stick through it, or drink more water or take a few supplements? That in order to get well you have to get sick first? That the insomnia really is you having more energy and hence needing less sleep? And yet it’s been weeks, months, or more than a year but you still experience those symptoms and you’re not really feeling well and – surprisingly – you have actually GAINED some weight?! If so, then it might be time to consider that the Ketogenic Diet is actually making you sick. WHAAAAAT??!! How could that be? You ask. And: Who am I to suggest such blasphemy? I’m a former Keto Fanatic, someone who had been on the Ketogenic Diet for over 1 year until I realized that ketosis was wrecking havoc with my body, and now I’m here to tell you all about it. How did I get into the Ketogenic Diet? Did I go from eating pizza and drinking Cola straight to eating 4 eggs for breakfast Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

Who should go on a low-carb diet? Low-carbohydrate diets — like the ketogenic diet — are effective for weight loss and improving health. They are also especially helpful for anyone who: Is overweight or obese Is sedentary Has epilepsy Has polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), fibroids or endometriosis Is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes Has a neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s Has certain forms of cancer Has cardiovascular disease A typical low-carb diet limits the daily intake of carbohydrates to between 60 and 130 grams, while a ketogenic diet tends to stay below 30 grams of carbohydrates. This is done by excluding or limiting most grains, legumes, fruits, bread, sweets, pasta and starchy vegetables from the diet and replacing them with added fats, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, non-starchy vegetables, nuts, and seeds. When we eat in this way, our bodies begin to change dramatically — especially for those who habitually eat plenty of carbohydrates with each meal. Not all of these changes, however, are going to be positive. When carbohydrates are restricted, it is stressful for the body because it must find another way to fuel itself. This can cause side effects, like nausea and headaches, that is commonly called the “keto flu”. The lack of carbohydrates will also lead to fluid and mineral loss and hormonal changes that can cause health issues if not addressed. The Most Common Side Effects The most common side effects that are experienced when restricting carbohydrates are: Headache Bad breath Weakness Fatigue Constipation or diarrhea It is important, however, to consider how common these symptoms actually are. In studies that put obese patients on a ketogenic diet for 6 months or longer (up to two years), no side effects or co Continue reading >>

On The Keto Diet? Ketosis Symptoms And Benefits Explained

On The Keto Diet? Ketosis Symptoms And Benefits Explained

“How do I know if I’m in ketosis?” If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for a little while, that’s a legitimate question. If you’re diligently following the plan you know that it takes effort to be on the keto diet. And at this point you’re probably wondering, “what are Ketosis Symptoms?” Do you have to have ketosis breath (hopefully not, right)? Do you have to have a keto headache or have a bout of keto diarrhea (again, hopefully not right)? Maybe you need to have metallic breath and a keto headache to fully be in ketosis. If you’re confused about ketosis symptoms and you really want to be sure that you’re not missing the mark with the ketogenic diet then you definitely need to read this article. We’re going to cover the benefits of ketosis and commonly experienced ketosis symptoms. By the end of the article you’ll have all the information you need to know so that you can easily tell if you’re in ketosis. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is one of the most misunderstood medical terms among laymen and even health professionals and medical experts. Often, they confuse it with ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening condition caused due to deficiency of insulin). If you are going to follow the ketogenic diet, it is crucial to know about nutritional ketosis, when and why it occurs and the possible ketosis symptoms. In simple words, ketosis is a metabolic state where the body uses fat for fuel. In the absence of dietary carbs your body will use fat and protein for energy. Essentially, you’re turning the body into a fat burner vs. a sugar burner. Most people in Western nations are sugar burners (which is why weight management issues are so common). The Western diet is full of sugar and high glycemic foods. In this environment the body adapts to bur Continue reading >>

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural form of eating. I started eating more greens. More vegetables. More nutrient-dense plants. And I combined those plants with oodles of healthy, natural fats like avocadoes, olive oil, coconut milk, seeds, nuts, fatty fish, grass-fed meats, and yes, even “weird” foods like bone broth, liver, sardines and many of these unorthodox meals and pantry foods. I began eating the “cyclic” low-carbohydrate diet that I outline in my book on low carbohydrate eating for athletes, meaning that I would save the majority of my carbohydrate intake for the very end of the day, and even then, I ate the clean Continue reading >>

The Anatomy Of A Keto Diet That Gets Results

The Anatomy Of A Keto Diet That Gets Results

If you’re looking to start a ketogenic diet, look no further… Here is a complete guide that will show you how to start a keto diet without messing around with any of that “complicated” stuff. There are more than 4000 words of the best keto info, and if I were you, I’d make time to read it all. By the end of reading this guide, you will know more about the ketogenic diet than 99% of people. Let’s get started! What is a Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet (keto diet) is low carb diet that is designed to help your body burn fat more efficiently. It focuses on restricting carbs, eating sufficient amount of protein, and consuming fat for satiety. Other low carb diets, like South Beach and Atkins, do not restrict protein intake, where standard ketogenic diet focuses on consuming protein goal in the range of 0.6-0.8 grams per pound of your lean body mass. The ketogenic diet has been practiced for thousands of years without people fully understanding the underlying biochemistry of it. Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, using ketogenic diet in the form of fasting. In the 1920s ketogenic diet became very popular in treating epilepsy. Back then, keto diet consisted of low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with fasting. In the 1920s Mynie Peterman established the standard ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy with 10-15 grams of carbs per day, 1 gram of protein per kilo of mass per day, and the rest of calories from fat. The results in epilepsy patients are indeed astounding. 50% of patients improved their seizures and 33% became seizure-free. Later scientists discovered other health benefits of a ketogenic diet, like weight loss, enhanced endurance and performance, and an incredible response to patients with other health issues. These a Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Tips

Low Carb Dieting Tips

Discuss this article! Low Carbing and Intestinal Health By Doreen Constipation Diarrhea Irritable Bowel (IBS) Constipation and diarrhea happen to everybody at one time or another. Changes in the diet and eating habits, food choices, stress, illness, medications .. these all affect the digestive process. Some low carbers experience diarrhea in the early days of Induction, as their bodies get rid of excess carbohydrates, and ketone production begins. Then constipation becomes a problem, not because of low carbing per se, but from lack of fiber. Whole grains, legumes and fruits, are the usual sources of dietary fiber, but of course these foods are restricted during the early phases of a controlled-carb program. Some general suggestions for overall bowel health and regularity include eat a variety of foods, including low carb high-fiber vegetables, leafy greens and salads drink lots of water get regular exercise CONSTIPATION It's been said some folks take a week or more for the "first" movement, after switching to low carb. If your previous diet was full of highly processed and refined sugary starch carbs, changing to eating more meats and low-starch vegetables will take a bit of adjustment. Once you do "go", things will return to a regular pattern. The constipation problem may be from a combination of things. Definitely more fiber from vegetables and whole fruits, if allowed, and/or a fiber suppelement such as psyllium or ground fresh flax seeds will be helpful. Also, drink more WATER. Chronic constipation can be a symptom of low thyroid. Whether or not there's adequate fiber and bulk in the diet, this can cause slowed metabolism and a sluggish bowel. What happens then is that water gets reabsorbed from the colon, and things become, um .. hard as a rock. Check with your he Continue reading >>

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Sign up for updates to receive one week FREE of my low carb and gluten free meal plans: CHECK OUT SOME OF MY OTHER FAVORITE LOW CARB KETO RESOURCES: Is being in ketosis safe? Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. An Overview of Ketosis First, it’s necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven’t eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn’t happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to “adapt” to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the “low-carb flu” or “keto flu.” Bottom Line: In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead o Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Of The Keto Diet?

Of The Keto Diet?

There are many awesome benefits that come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings and even possibly reduce disease risks. With that being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to expect when you get started on this mission. If you’ve already heard about some of the side-effects that come with this special diet and are starting to freak out, don’t panic. We’re going to break down everything you need to know when it comes to what your body will experience when using these supplements for the first time. It’s important to remember, not everyone experiences side-effects when starting a ketogenic diet and thankfully, the symptoms are all very temporary and it can pass very quickly. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to break down each possible side effect that you could possibly experience. 1. Flu Symptoms Within the first 2-4 days of beginning this diet, a common side-effect is known as the “ketosis flu” or “induction flu” because it mimics the symptoms of the actual flu. This means you might experience: Headaches Lethargy Lack of motivation Brain fog or confusion Irritability​ Although these symptoms typically go away completely within a few days, they are also completely avoidable if you stay very hydrated and increase your salt intake and like always, be sure you're eating enough fat. 2. Dizzyness & Drowsiness​ As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you tired, lightheaded or dizzy. You may also experience muscle cramps, headaches and skin itchiness. Fatigue Continue reading >>

Sweeteners, Ongoing Health Issues, And Your Poo

Sweeteners, Ongoing Health Issues, And Your Poo

Keto podcast answering your questions about good and bad sweeteners, what to do when you feel like your body is working against you, and ending diarrhea on keto. How to sweeten food, without the blood sugar spike Steps toward allowing your body to heal itself Why eating keto can lead to diarrhea (and what to do about it) SHOW NOTES + LINKS Start your high-fat, keto life with The Keto Bundle Listen to: Episode 14 The reasons why a carb up practice is a great idea The podcast has changed to The Keto Diet Podcast. Subscribe and listen on iTunes or your favorite podcast app. TIMESTAMPS How to sweeten food, without the blood sugar spike (8:02) Steps toward allowing your body to heal itself (23:34) Why eating keto can lead to diarrhea (41:52) OUR PARTNERS Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. Today’s mind-blowing episode is brought to you by Genuine Health Vegan greens+ O. Visit your local health food, grocery, drugstore or online at Vitamart to purchase now! Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

On Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalances

On Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalances

During the induction phase of a Ketogenic Diet, or even a Low-carb, Paleo Diet, some people may experience “flu” like symptoms (tiredness, lethargy, shortness of breath, even arrhythmia) that often makes one believe that what they are doing is not right for their bodies. This “flu” is a manifestation of both mental and physical dependence on carbohydrates as the body is essentially going through a phase where it has to learn (or better said, re-learn) to use fats as fuel. Tiredness and Lethargy Most people who do a Ketogenic or Paleo Diet, initially end up cutting a lot of processed food. and when one cuts processed food, one also cuts a lot of sodium intake. Contrary to what we have been led to believe, sodium is not exactly bad for us, and we actually need to supplement with, as most animals do naturally. To learn more about why current sodium guidelines are wrong, I suggest you read “The Salt Fix”, the new book by James DiNicolantonio, cardiovascular research scientist and doctor of pharmacy who overturns conventional thinking about salt and explores instead the little-understood importance of it, the health dangers of having too little, and how salt can actually help you improve sports performance, crush sugar cravings, and stave off common chronic illnesses. When one cuts back on carbohydrates, one does not experience blood sugar spikes every time one eats and digests food, because well, one is hardly eating any sugar (all carbohydrates end up as sugars in the body). As a result, the body does not need to elevate circulating insulin levels to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Under “normal” conditions, the kidneys tend to store and reuse a lot of sodium. When your insulin levels are very low and stable, the kidneys through various hormonal mechanis Continue reading >>

Does Keto//os Have Any Side Effects?

Does Keto//os Have Any Side Effects?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, constipation, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of Uncharged Keto//OS or BioMax, drink plenty of water. KETO//OS 2.1 and Keto Kreme is blended with medium chain triglycerides, which can often times cause digestive distress. This is due to the fact that your body has not yet adapted to the increased fats in your diet, and is less efficient at utilizing ketones as its fuel source. Once the body has adapted to this increased fat in the diet, the digestive distress should resolve. We recommend to start slowly with a reduced serving size and build up to a full serving twice a day, but it is totally up to the individual. If diarrhea, stomach cramping or constipation occur, reduce your serving size of Keto//OS and/or consume Keto//OS with food (fat or protein) until bowel movements have returned to normal. Do not increase Keto//OS if you are experience digestive stress. Please make sure that you are drinking enough water and taking a multi-mineral supplement or an/ electrolyte. Experiencing Diarrhea and cramping then decrease Keto//OS, drink slower (over 20-30minutes) and consume with food. This will slow down the absorption of the exogenous ketones. Do not increase Keto//OS until bowel movements have returned to normal and use the uncharged version. Experiencing Continue reading >>

More in ketosis