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Constant Diarrhea On Keto

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

The Ketogenic diet pretty much goes against everything you've been told about dieting I'm extremely surprised by the results and how amazing I feel... I dropped 12 pounds in 6 weeks and lost about 3% body-fat (21% to 18%) and gained strength at the gym. All the bloating I used to have when clean eating went away, I have more energy and my hunger went down so much that I sometimes force myself to reach my 1500 calories per day. So even if it was hard getting into it at first, I though some of you would like to know about it! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Keto is a very low-carbohydrates, high-fat, adequate protein diet. The Ketogenic diet is almost 100 yeard old, it was use as a treatment for the epileptic patients in the 1920 and 1930s: How does the Ketogenic Diet work? When you drastically limit your carbohydrates intake, your body can longer rely on it as its main source of energy, fat will become your new main source of energy which also includes your body fat. When using fat as energy, your body will first break it into Ketones. When your Ketones level is higher than normal (meaning you're burning fat), you are in a state of Ketosis. 1. The Ketogenic Diet helps you lose body-fat, bad cholesterol and preservers your lean body mass! If you want to lose fat, this is the best way to do so. The reason for this is that when you're on a normal glycolytic metabolism, fat is considered as a backup fuel by your body and is only used as a last resort. On a "default metabolic state", if your body needs energy it will : First look for glucose in your blood-stream; If no glucose is found it will try to convert the glycogen in your liver into glucose; If no glycogen is found, it will break down MUSCLES and fat (fat being the very last option). Under Ketosis, fat is the first option! Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet And Diarrhea

Low-carb Diet And Diarrhea

Making a major change in your diet in an effort to lose weight or improve your health takes dedication and hard work. But learning the ins and outs of a new diet isn’t always the most challenging aspect of committing yourself to a different eating regimen. Sometimes, a change in diet can come with unwanted -- often gastrointestinal -- side effects. Experiencing persistent diarrhea after switching to a low-carb diet may just be temporary, or it may mean that you need to make some adjustments. Video of the Day Your body is used to the diet you’ve been feeding it, so a significant change in dietary composition can result in digestive distress. This isn’t necessarily linked to the type of change you’ve made – substantially boosting your fiber intake, going low-fat or shifting to a very-high-protein diet can all have the same kind of effect. Gastrointestinal symptoms include excess gas, abdominal discomfort, constipation and diarrhea. If your diarrhea is related to a major change in diet, it should gradually disappear as your body adjusts. Change-induced symptoms typically last anywhere from several days to a couple of weeks, depending on how readily your body adapts. Temporary Fat Malabsorption Because most low-carb diets strictly limit carbohydrates, a higher proportion of calories must come from fat and protein. Fat typically accounts for roughly 45 to 65 percent of calories in a low-carb diet. If your previous diet was relatively low in fat -- maybe the generally recommended 20 to 35 percent of calories -- your body probably hasn’t ever had to process a consistently high-fat diet. When your pancreas isn't producing enough fat-digesting enzymes to keep up with demand, improperly digested fat can cause diarrhea. Unless you have an underlying health problem, how Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

The Dreaded Keto Flu

The Dreaded Keto Flu

For all the excellent benefits of the ketogenic lifestyle, getting there can be a physically rough road. The primary reason for this is what is known as the “keto flu”. Almost everyone who has changed their life to the healthy ketogenic lifestyle has had to deal with the keto flu, and some have had a worse deal than others. Background The keto flu is the common name for the induction phase of ketogenesis. That means it’s the period of time when your body is getting used to the changes you have made to what you eat. When you change what you eat, you change everything about how your body operates and functions. Inside your gut (where close to 70% of your immune system lives) are billions of bacteria, and they are all battling for dominance. If your diet consists of highly refined carbs, the types of bacteria that thrive in your gut (e. coli, h. pylori, candida a, etc.) will be inflammatory and detrimental to your immune system. By changing your diet to be high in fat, those same bacteria die off rapidly, because they don’t have their preferred energy source. This massive bacteria death has consequences. These consequences are typically: Diarrhea Headaches Nausea Lack of mental focus and clarity Fatigue In short: You feel like you have the flu. That’s because, in a way, you do. Your immune system is taking a beating when you make the change, because it has grown accustomed to the way things have been. But once you get through the induction phase, and you start to feel better, your immune system will be several times stronger and more efficient. That’s one of the reason that Ketovangelists don’t get sick (and when they do, it’s not nearly as bad as it could have been). Changing Fuel Sources The best way to think about what you’re doing to your body is to i Continue reading >>

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural form of eating. I started eating more greens. More vegetables. More nutrient-dense plants. And I combined those plants with oodles of healthy, natural fats like avocadoes, olive oil, coconut milk, seeds, nuts, fatty fish, grass-fed meats, and yes, even “weird” foods like bone broth, liver, sardines and many of these unorthodox meals and pantry foods. I began eating the “cyclic” low-carbohydrate diet that I outline in my book on low carbohydrate eating for athletes, meaning that I would save the majority of my carbohydrate intake for the very end of the day, and even then, I ate the clean Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Tips

Low Carb Dieting Tips

Discuss this article! Low Carbing and Intestinal Health By Doreen Constipation Diarrhea Irritable Bowel (IBS) Constipation and diarrhea happen to everybody at one time or another. Changes in the diet and eating habits, food choices, stress, illness, medications .. these all affect the digestive process. Some low carbers experience diarrhea in the early days of Induction, as their bodies get rid of excess carbohydrates, and ketone production begins. Then constipation becomes a problem, not because of low carbing per se, but from lack of fiber. Whole grains, legumes and fruits, are the usual sources of dietary fiber, but of course these foods are restricted during the early phases of a controlled-carb program. Some general suggestions for overall bowel health and regularity include eat a variety of foods, including low carb high-fiber vegetables, leafy greens and salads drink lots of water get regular exercise CONSTIPATION It's been said some folks take a week or more for the "first" movement, after switching to low carb. If your previous diet was full of highly processed and refined sugary starch carbs, changing to eating more meats and low-starch vegetables will take a bit of adjustment. Once you do "go", things will return to a regular pattern. The constipation problem may be from a combination of things. Definitely more fiber from vegetables and whole fruits, if allowed, and/or a fiber suppelement such as psyllium or ground fresh flax seeds will be helpful. Also, drink more WATER. Chronic constipation can be a symptom of low thyroid. Whether or not there's adequate fiber and bulk in the diet, this can cause slowed metabolism and a sluggish bowel. What happens then is that water gets reabsorbed from the colon, and things become, um .. hard as a rock. Check with your he Continue reading >>

Of The Keto Diet?

Of The Keto Diet?

There are many awesome benefits that come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings and even possibly reduce disease risks. With that being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to expect when you get started on this mission. If you’ve already heard about some of the side-effects that come with this special diet and are starting to freak out, don’t panic. We’re going to break down everything you need to know when it comes to what your body will experience when using these supplements for the first time. It’s important to remember, not everyone experiences side-effects when starting a ketogenic diet and thankfully, the symptoms are all very temporary and it can pass very quickly. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to break down each possible side effect that you could possibly experience. 1. Flu Symptoms Within the first 2-4 days of beginning this diet, a common side-effect is known as the “ketosis flu” or “induction flu” because it mimics the symptoms of the actual flu. This means you might experience: Headaches Lethargy Lack of motivation Brain fog or confusion Irritability​ Although these symptoms typically go away completely within a few days, they are also completely avoidable if you stay very hydrated and increase your salt intake and like always, be sure you're eating enough fat. 2. Dizzyness & Drowsiness​ As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you tired, lightheaded or dizzy. You may also experience muscle cramps, headaches and skin itchiness. Fatigue Continue reading >>

Troubleshoot Diarrhea On A Low Carb, Keto Diet

Troubleshoot Diarrhea On A Low Carb, Keto Diet

When transitioning into a low carb, keto diet, there are some funky things that happen with your digestive tract. As always, the preliminary stages are a time to adjust to your new way of eating. Usually, with a dramatic increase in fat and reduction in carbs, most people will experience a period of loose bowels or diarrhea, which is normal. There are claims that this effect is candida die-off, but I’ve yet to find literature in which that is verified. These symptoms last just a couple of days. For others, this period is lengthened and it can be a little trickier. If you are experiencing diarrhea, you could try the following: 1. Drink more water Many people don’t realize that when you start a low carb, keto diet that your body is flushing water much more rapidly than you have before. When this happens, it’s extremely easy to be dehydrated. Make sure you are drinking enough water to stay hydrated. You will notice that you will go to the bathroom a lot more frequently, but this is also an adjustment period. After a week or so, your body will be used to the increase in water intake and will level off. 2. Consume more electrolytes This goes along with the previous statement. When water is flushed from the body, electrolytes are also excreted through the urine. If the electrolytes aren’t replaced, you could very easily become dehydrated and develop diarrhea, among other things. Some good ways to replenish these electrolytes is to eat avocado, consume salty bone broth daily and if that isn’t cutting it, try taking Lite Salt with your food (this can replace your regular table salt). Drinking bone broth will also contain collagen which could help bulk up stools and aid in the gut-healing process. 3. Add probiotics and fermented foods Probiotics are excellent for bulki Continue reading >>

On The Keto Diet? Ketosis Symptoms And Benefits Explained

On The Keto Diet? Ketosis Symptoms And Benefits Explained

“How do I know if I’m in ketosis?” If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for a little while, that’s a legitimate question. If you’re diligently following the plan you know that it takes effort to be on the keto diet. And at this point you’re probably wondering, “what are Ketosis Symptoms?” Do you have to have ketosis breath (hopefully not, right)? Do you have to have a keto headache or have a bout of keto diarrhea (again, hopefully not right)? Maybe you need to have metallic breath and a keto headache to fully be in ketosis. If you’re confused about ketosis symptoms and you really want to be sure that you’re not missing the mark with the ketogenic diet then you definitely need to read this article. We’re going to cover the benefits of ketosis and commonly experienced ketosis symptoms. By the end of the article you’ll have all the information you need to know so that you can easily tell if you’re in ketosis. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is one of the most misunderstood medical terms among laymen and even health professionals and medical experts. Often, they confuse it with ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening condition caused due to deficiency of insulin). If you are going to follow the ketogenic diet, it is crucial to know about nutritional ketosis, when and why it occurs and the possible ketosis symptoms. In simple words, ketosis is a metabolic state where the body uses fat for fuel. In the absence of dietary carbs your body will use fat and protein for energy. Essentially, you’re turning the body into a fat burner vs. a sugar burner. Most people in Western nations are sugar burners (which is why weight management issues are so common). The Western diet is full of sugar and high glycemic foods. In this environment the body adapts to bur Continue reading >>

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Sign up for updates to receive one week FREE of my low carb and gluten free meal plans: CHECK OUT SOME OF MY OTHER FAVORITE LOW CARB KETO RESOURCES: Is being in ketosis safe? Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. An Overview of Ketosis First, it’s necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven’t eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn’t happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to “adapt” to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the “low-carb flu” or “keto flu.” Bottom Line: In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead o Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

What Do You Do About Bad Diarrhea?

What Do You Do About Bad Diarrhea?

I've been very strict paleo since January 1, 2010. I have religiously avoided gluten in any form for that entire time and the only cheating of any kind was some rice and cheese when camping over 6 months ago. I'm pretty serious about this, so I'm pretty sure this isn't gluten contamination I'm experiencing. I've had some pretty bad diarrhea for the last week and I have no idea where it came from. Aside from trying to lean out by cutting my carbs way down I'm eating the same thing I always eat and I'd be surprised if I was in ketosis. My sleep is good, I'm not exercising myself to death...I just don't know what's up. I'm trying to treat it with digestive enzymes and probiotics but it's not helping. I tried eating only broth, chicken and carrots to ease things off and even though I wasn't getting enough calories I felt better. However after a couple of solid meals my symptoms returned. I'm completely at a loss as to what's going on and I'm terrified that I've developed a beef allergy because I don't know how you can possibly stay paleo with a beef allergy. All that being said, I'm curious if you guys have any other suggestions to help with the water-butt itself. Have any of you guys had this kind of random outbreak or anything that has lasted this long? Would it be worth it to take some imodium? Should I just ride it out with the superenzymes and probiotics? Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

There are many symptoms and adverse effects reported by study groups on low carbohydrate diets such as the ketogenic diet. The main ketogenic diet symptoms are: headache, dizziness, presence of diarrhea and constipation, weakness, loss of concentration, bad breath, low blood pressure, increased heart rate, among many others. According to Dr. Mauro DiPasquale, a respected member of the international sports community as an athlete, administrator and physician, and author of the famous book “The Anabolic Diet”, he originally created this diet for bodybuilders and athletes, but since then he has developed other versions for the general public. This is a very interesting article about ketogenic diet from ncbi. about “Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients”. He says that in the first week of the ketogenic diet the body is going through the metabolic shift from being a carb and muscle-burning machine to being a fat burner, and that can be very difficult. This is called the induction phase and people may have some symptoms including lethargy, dizziness, mental fogginess, irritability, and irregular bowels, depending on how your body reacts to the radical shift in macronutrients. Some people will suffer few symptoms, others will be very affected. Your energy can also drop and there might be a frequent feeling of you being hungry. That’s because the body is going through a readjustment phase. Due to the low amount of nutrients, especially vitamins and minerals, may also occur weakening of the immune system, leaving the body more susceptible to several infections. So, the discipline and persistence during the first week of the ketogenic diet is very important to experience the benefits later. The energy will come back and you will feel better. This will Continue reading >>

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