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Compensated Vs Uncompensated Respiratory Acidosis

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EKG rhythm interpretation on how to count a heart rate using the 6 second rule. This video shows how to calculate a heart rate on an ECG strip using the six second rule. It is easy to interpret an EKG using the 6 second rule. "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?l

Abg And Ekg Flashcards | Quizlet

Signs and symptoms: Diaphoresis, Nausea/vomiting, increase neuromuscular excitability, shallow breathing, EKG changes, Lethargy to coma. Measures the current of energy from the right arm (-) to the left arm (+), LOOKS AT THE LATERAL SURFACE OF VENTRICLE, Cardiac monitoring, lateral wall changes, hemiblocks. Measures the current of energy from the right arm (-) to the left leg (+), LOOKS AT THE INFERIOR SURFACE OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE, Inferior wall changes, atrial abnormalities. Measures the current of energy from the left arm (-) to the left leg (+) Looks at the INFERIOR SURFACE OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE, Hemiblocks Records activity from the heart (-) to the right shoulder (+) aVL records activity from the heart (-) to the left shoulder (+) (lateral wall changes) Records activity from the heart (-) to the left foot (+) (inferior wall changes) The positive electrode is always in front of the heart, and the negative is the left shoulder. V1: 4th ICS, right of sternum, V2: 4th ICS, left of sternum, V3: Halfway between V2 and V4, V4: 5th ICS, MCL, V5: Halfway between V4 and V6, V6: Midaxillary line 5th ICS waves, complexes, segments, and intervals a reflection that can be positive or negat Continue reading >>

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  1. eager2bMD

    Can someone please explain to me why alcohols are more acidic than both aldehydes and ketones?
    From my rationalization, I would think it would be the other way around because the more acidic molecule will be the one whose conjugate base is most stable. The carbonyl group on aldehydes and ketones is electron-withdrawing, which would stabilize the negative charge better, so wouldn't this make their conjugate bases more stable and thus make aldehydes and ketones more acidic?
    If somebody could please tell me where my logic is wrong, I would realllly appreciate it! Thanks!!!

  2. Bruinsfinalfour

    eager2bMD said: ↑
    Can someone please explain to me why alcohols are more acidic than both aldehydes and ketones?
    From my rationalization, I would think it would be the other way around because the more acidic molecule will be the one whose conjugate base is most stable. The carbonyl group on aldehydes and ketones is electron-withdrawing, which would stabilize the negative charge better, so wouldn't this make their conjugate bases more stable and thus make aldehydes and ketones more acidic?
    If somebody could please tell me where my logic is wrong, I would realllly appreciate it! Thanks!!! Your logic is wrong in that if you de-protonate an aldehyde/ketone...you are left with an ionic carbon atom...which you should know is extremely unstable. When you de-protonate an alcohol, you are left with an ionic oxygen atom which is much more stable (bigger, more electronegative)

  3. eager2bMD

    Thanks Bruins! By focusing on little details, I completely neglected the most basic principles. Thanks for the help!

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http://bit.ly/1HjUiAOUncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, um weitere Informationen ber Uncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, klicken Sie bitte aufhttp://bit.ly/1HjUiAO

Uncompensated Acidosis | Definition Of Uncompensated Acidosis By Medical Dictionary

Uncompensated acidosis | definition of uncompensated acidosis by Medical dictionary Related to uncompensated acidosis: acidotic , acidemia an acidosis in which the pH of body fluids is subnormal, because restoration of normal acid-base balance is not possible or has not yet been achieved. a pathological condition resulting from accumulation of acid or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, and characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biological activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis . It is rare that acidosis occurs in the absence of some underlying disease process. The more obvious signs of severe acidosis are muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation and coma. a condition in which the compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal. a metabolic acidosis produced by accumulation of ketones in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. may result from administration of drugs, such as urinary acidifiers, or anesthetic agents which Continue reading >>

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  1. Shama

    I was diagnosed as t1 four weeks ago. I was admitted to hospital with BGLs of 19 and ketones were 5.5, so I was DKA.
    I spent 24 hours in emergency while they brought down my ketones to zero then spent another 8 days in hospital getting stabilised and learning how to inject insulin etc.
    My question is: how long does it take to fully recover from DKA? I went back to work yesterday and was exhausted after 7 hours (including a short lunchbreak). I deliberately didn't do very much; just got through my backlog of emails and did a bit of reading. When I got home, I perked up a bit after dinner. Today, it was the same at work but tonight I am SO tired I can barely walk and I can't do *anything* other than sit and watch tv. I can't keep doing this. I need to be able to function at least a bit in the evenings, and this is without me doing my usual job of answering complex (and long) phone calls and emails. Is this normal??
    I wasn't in a coma (I walked into emergency). I lost 3kg in the fortnight before I was admitted despite eating heaps, and lost more weight before that. I had a lot of muscle pain and muscle cramps before diagnosis, and couldn't walk up a hill without having to stop all the time to catch my breath. (plus the classic insatiable thirst and peeing heaps)
    When I first got out of hospital I basically just tried to get on with normal life and started exercising, ie a 20 minute walk most days. Then I carried lots of heavy boxes (long story) over several days. I was fine at the time then lost some stamina late last week. The DE (after I'd done all this exercise, not before!) said now was not the time to hit the gym, just as a throwaway comment. I didn't ask her to elaborate but did scale back my daily walks a bit.
    I'm going to ring the DE or endo tomorrow to see if this is normal and if I need more time before going back to work (I'm not driving yet, hubby can't afford to take time off to pick me up early each day and the bus home involves two 15 minute walks each end and a 45 minute bus ride). But I would like to know other people's experiences with DKA recovery, particularly if it was a pre-diagnosis one with several weeks of symptoms.
    Thanks in advance :)

  2. Magenta76

    Hi Shama, sucks that you have to be here, but glad that you found us!!
    I, unfortunately, have a LOT of experience with DKA's... (something like 9 or 10 in 13 years of diagnosis) Each of them the recovery time has been different.
    My diagnosis, I have no idea what my level of ketones was, I know my BSL was 30something, and I was incredibly ill, and weighed something ridiculous like 50kgs.... with hindsight I was probably presenting symptoms at least 2 or 3 months before I was diagnosed.
    After my diagnosis, I took the probably set standard, month off. I went back to work as a chef after that, I don't really remember what it felt like, I was 22 so I probably was not too bad. I think we all would have different recovery times to anything and everything, so I don't think anyone could give you a straight answer on how long it will take for your body to go back to "normal". Talk to your HP's but take it day by day would be the best bet. Not really helpful, I know, but can't say any more than that.
    My last DKA was extremely severe. We're talking coma, organ failure type stuff. That was 18 months ago. My body is still recuperating from that one. I know that for me, each time I have a DKA, the whole episode is worse, and I take longer each time to get better. I just wish I discovered and knew about all the triggers for me. Stress is a large factor for about half of mine, which unfortunately means that when I get the all clear to work again, I have to change my career.
    Good luck with everything, and I hope you are feeling better soon. Try not to overdo it. Your body would still be adjusting. Let it. :)

  3. tantan

    Hi Shama,
    I have a similar story to you. I was diagnosed about 4 years ago, with ++++ ketones (whatever that means), a BGL of 32.7, and weight loss of 9kg in the preceding 3 and a half weeks. My understanding is that DKA involves the body basically chewing up fat because the lack of insulin means it can't access the glucose in your body, even if you're eating lots of it! So a lot of that weight loss is coming from storage (and we all need some fat storage for normal functioning! :-) ). At the end of the day, it will take a body awhile to replenish those stores, work properly again, and get back to the state it was at prior to diagnosis (and prior to the weeks leading up to diagnosis).
    I can't remember how long it took me to recover fully. I was diagnosed several weeks before Christmas, which was a massively busy time at the company where I was working. The doctor at the hospital gave me a medical certificate for at least a week off, but I actually only took about two days. However, I only worked shorter days for at least a week, maybe two, once I went back. I wasn't allowed to drive, so my co-worker would pick me up in the morning on her way to work, and my husband would pick me up in the afternoon when he finished at his work (which was always about 1-2 hours earlier than my usual finishing time). I found that I felt better in the mornings, so that worked for me.
    I think the best one can do for one's body after something like DKA is to eat healthily and get plenty of sleep!
    All the best!
    Tanya

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Respiratory alkalosis and acidosis made easy for nurses. This NCLEX review is part of a acid base balance for nurses series. In this video I discuss respiratory alkalosis causes, signs & symptoms, nursing interventions, and "How to Solve ABGs Problems using the TIC TAC TOE method" for patients in respiratory alkalosis. Quiz: Respiratory Acidosis vs Respiratory Alkalosis: http://www.registerednursern.com/resp... Review notes for Respiratory Alkalosis: http://www.registerednursern.com/resp... Solving ABGs with TIC TAC TOE Method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URCS4... Respiratory Acidosis Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0Vjn... Metabolic Acidosis Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hitB3... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "

Respiratory Therapy Cave: Abg Interpretation Made Easy: Acid Base Balance

ABG interpretation made easy: acid base balance So you made it this far. Now you must interpret the results. Looking for some tips to ease your anxiety over an upcoming test that covers arterial blood gas (ABG) interpretation? Well, look no further. The goal of this blog is to make your life easy. ABG interpretation is as easy as remembering four basic questions, and then answering them in sequence. Of course then you'll have to practice, practice, practice. By the time your test comes up you should be an ABG interpretation expert. To make things simple, I will only refer to the three basic ABG values in this post To interpret these results, all you have to do is memorize these four basic questions, and then answer them in order. If all the values fall within the normal parameters, then you have a normal ABG and you can stop here: The ABG is normal. If any one of the values is out of the normal range, then you must move on to the next question. B. Is the pH Acidotic or Alkalotic?To determine this you look only at the pH. Alkalotic: If the pH is greater than 7.45 the patient is Alkalotic. Acidotic: If the pH is below 7.35 the patient is acidotic. C. Is the cause respiratory or meta Continue reading >>

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  1. sparkieamberjack

    I have been low carb for 2 weeks and I was doing good. I have about 20 carbs a day, however, today I had 15 grams of carbs and I cheated by having a few bites of my husbands Ice cream sandwhich. I figure I had 7 grams of suar and 12 grams of carbs from my cheat. So I had 27 grams of carbs for the day and 7 grams of added sugar not counting the natural sugar from the veggies I ate today. Could my cheat throw me out?

  2. MermaidTX

    Your diary for today shows you had 29 carbs. The 9 sugar carbs & the 4 fiber carbs are included in that carb total. But for sake of ketosis, you can deduct the fiber so your net carbs is only 25.
    Even at 29 carbs (without deducting fiber) you shouldn't get kicked out.
    Some people can get to 50g carbs daily & not get kicked out. I've never tried that myself tho.

  3. sparkieamberjack

    thank you

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