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Coming Out Of Ketosis Symptoms

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Note: If you don’t know what the ketogenic is all about then check out the Ketogenic Diet: Beginner’s Guide to Keto and Weight Loss. This is when your body starts to produce a lot of ketones to supply energy for your body. Why is this good? Because it means your body has converted from a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. If your body is burning fat for energy then something amazing starts to happen. The fat on your body starts to disappear. But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Besides using test strips or an instrument there are some signs that your body will give. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis These don’t 100% guarantee that your body is in ketosis but if it is in ketosis then these signs will appear. 1. Weight Loss One of the obvious signs of ketosis is weight loss but this can also be pretty deceptive because many people don’t experience the kind of weight loss that they expect. This can happen for a variety of reasons but when you get close to entering ketosis or do enter ketosis you’ll find that you lose a healthy amount of weight quickly. For example, when you switch to low carbs you usually experience significant weight loss in the first week. In fact, my wife lost 12 lbs in the first 28 days of Keto and I lost 13. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells. If your fat cells don’t release this water then they can’t flow through the bloodstream to be used as fuel so losing water weight is a good thing. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet Continue reading >>

How Do I Safely Get Out Of Ketosis?

How Do I Safely Get Out Of Ketosis?

I'm not sure why you would want to get out of ketosis; it's better for your body than relying on carbs for energy. For more reliable information, you can go to ketogains.com, or search for ketogains on facebook and join the group. AlabasterVerve Posts: 2,787Member Member Posts: 2,787Member Member Eat carbs to get out of ketosis. Increasing your carbs and your calories both are going to cause water weight gain - there's no getting around that. And no, feeling sick is not needed for ketosis. The launch pad in the LCD group has more info if you're interested. GaleHawkins Posts: 6,587Member Member Posts: 6,587Member Member After only 17 days you most like are not fat adapted. I go in and out of ketosis daily now after being full time in ketosis for nearly two years. That is due to eating more than 50 grams of whole food carb sources daily. That is because I am doing my own version of Haylie Pomroy book The Fast Metabolism Diet: Eat More Food and Lose More Weight way of eating. In short it is 2 days high carb, 2 days of high protein and three days of low carb high fat way of eating. It is fun plus I am losing pounds again after being at 200 for the past year. Humans are Flex Fuel machines and can run on glucose/ketones as needed as long as we are getting enough protein and fats. There is no safety issues that I know about other than for totally insulin dependent diabetes. Asher_Ethan Posts: 2,372Member Member Posts: 2,372Member Member It's been years since I read the Atkins book, but if memory serves me right, add carbs back in gradually. Do your next week at 40 g carbs, the week after at 60 etc etc. After only 17 days you most like are not fat adapted. I go in and out of ketosis daily now after being full time in ketosis for nearly two years. That is due to eating more tha Continue reading >>

What Happens When You Fall Out Of Ketosis During Dieting?

What Happens When You Fall Out Of Ketosis During Dieting?

Ketosis, a metabolic state where fat rather than carbohydrates becomes your primary energy source, occurs only when you follow a low-carbohydrate diet or a near-starvation diet. Your body normally uses carbohydrates for energy. On a low-carb diet, you cut carbohydrate consumption, so your body must find a new energy source. Eating as little as 50 and 100 g of carbohydrate per day can keep you out of ketosis, registered dietitian Janice Hermann, Ph.D. of Oklahoma State University reports. If you fall out of ketosis, a low-carbohydrate diet may not work for weight loss. Video of the Day Falling out of ketosis may slow or stop your weight loss, because low-carb diets don’t generally count calories. In fact, you may eat more calories while in ketosis and still lose weight. The official Atkins website published an abstract presented at the North American Association for the Study of Obesity Annual Meeting 2003. The 12-week study found that subjects following a low-carb diet who were consuming 300 calories per day more than subjects eating a low-calorie diet still lost more weight. However, if you are still eating fewer calories than you use, you may continue to lose weight even if you’re no longer in ketosis. Ketone Test Strip Changes Ketone test strips measure the concentration of ketones in your urine. The specially impregnated sticks turn purple when urine contains enough ketones to register. Generally speaking, the darker the purple, the deeper your degree of ketosis. If your ketone test strips were previously turning purple, the test strips will not change color if you’re no longer in ketosis. Being in ketosis appears to have an appetite-suppressant effect. This may help you eat less without feeling hungry while following a low-carbohydrate diet. If you're no long Continue reading >>

Kicked Out Of Ketosis? The Dirty Little Secret About Ketone Testing Strips

Kicked Out Of Ketosis? The Dirty Little Secret About Ketone Testing Strips

[Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. I might receive a small commission if you purchase something by using one of those links.] Confused about how ketone testing strips actually work? Do you think you've been kicked out of ketosis because they suddenly turned tan? Many low-carb dieters have misconceptions about Ketostix and blood ketone levels, so in this post, we are going to clear out some of those myths and misunderstandings. You'll get the truth about testing strips and learn what really causes those high blood ketone levels. If you hang out at low-carb forums for any length of time, you're bound to hear again and again how someone recently got kicked out of the state of ketosis, and they are looking for a fast way to get back in. Out of all of the issues that you can have with a low-carb lifestyle, understanding ketone testing strips is one of the biggies. “I got kicked out of ketosis,” is one of the most common complaints I hear. And while that may or may not be true, depending on the situation, there are a lot of misconceptions about the role that ketones and ketone testing strips play in a low-carb diet. Even those who are using a blood meter often go by the rumors circulating around the web instead of listening to Dr. Phinney himself. For example: One of the misconceptions I've run into over the years is the idea that ketones are used to fuel the entire body. This is only true at the very beginning of your low-carb diet. When the body first runs out of glucose, the body runs on protein and ketones, but as carbohydrate restriction continues past those first few days, your body goes through a series of steps, or adaptions, that eventually result in muscle insulin resistance. This resistance to the presence of insulin allows the ketones buildin Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

As the COO of Diet Doctor and low-carb enthusiast for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis years ago. I haven’t, and here’s why. Am I still in ketosis? To get into ketosis, the most important thing is to eat maximum 20 grams of digestible carbs per day. When I went low carb in 2012, I followed that advice to the letter – replacing all high-carb foods like potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, legumes, fruit, juice, soda, and candy, with eggs, dairy, meat, vegetables, fats and berries – counting every carb I consumed. I felt great – effortless weight loss, no stomach issues, tons of energy and inspiration. But over time, something changed – I no longer felt as great as I used to. Until recently, I had no idea why. The journey to find out started with a simple question: Am I still in ketosis? The moment of truth At a Diet Doctor dinner a while ago, our CTO, Johan, gently challenged me. “Bjarte, you’re eating quite a lot of protein. Have you measured your ketones lately?”. “No”, I said, feeling slightly defensive, “I’ve never measured my ketones. Should I?”. It was wake-up time. Johan and I grabbed two blood-ketone meters from a dusty drawer, pricked a finger each, and touched the ketone strips. His results came out first – 3.0 mmol/L – optimal ketosis. He looked happy. It was my turn. The ketone meter made a weird beeping sound and the screen started blinking – 0.0 mmol/L – no ketosis whatsoever. What?! I’d been eating strict low carb for years, how could I not be in ketosis? I felt slightly embarrassed, but mainly relieved. Was this the reason I no longer felt great? Experiment 1: Eating less than 60 grams of protein a day Several of my colleagues agreed with Johan – I was eating too much protein. To test that hypothesis, I s Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Symptoms, Signs & More

Ketosis: Symptoms, Signs & More

Every cell in your body needs energy to survive. Most of the time, you create energy from the sugar (glucose) in your bloodstream. Insulin helps regulate glucose levels in the blood and stimulate the absorption of glucose by the cells in your body. If you don’t have enough glucose or insufficient insulin to get the job done, your body will break down fat instead for energy. This supply of fat is an alternative energy source that keeps you from starvation. When you break down fat, you produce a compound called a ketone body. This process is called ketosis. Insulin is required by your cells in order to use the glucose in your blood, but ketones do not require insulin. The ketones that don’t get used for energy pass through your kidneys and out through your urine. Ketosis is most likely to occur in people who have diabetes, a condition in which the body produces little or no insulin. Ketosis and Ketoacidosis: What You Need To Know Ketosis simply means that your body is producing ketone bodies. You’re burning fat instead of glucose. Ketosis isn’t necessarily harmful to your health. If you don’t have diabetes and you maintain a healthy diet, it’s unlikely to be a problem. While ketosis itself isn’t particularly dangerous, it’s definitely something to keep an eye on, especially if you have diabetes. Ketosis can be a precursor to ketoacidosis, also known as diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a condition in which you have both high glucose and high ketone levels. Having ketoacidosis results in your blood becoming too acidic. It’s more common for those with type 1 diabetes rather than type 2. Once symptoms of ketoacidosis begin, they can escalate very quickly. Symptoms include: breath that smells fruity or like nail polish or nail polish remover rapid breat Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

The Article About Ketosis I Wish Was Out There When I Started

The Article About Ketosis I Wish Was Out There When I Started

The article about Ketosis I wish was out there when I started Diet is a really touchy subject and people love getting worked up about it. In this article I’m going to cover why the diet you follow doesn’t really matter that much, it’s about what you are trying to achieve. The reasons I follow this eating plan, from family cancer scares to increased energy and mental clarity. I also share some of the products and tools I use to make this as easy as possible. I’m going to get this out of the way right at the start here. I am not a doctor and I do not pretend to be one (except for Halloween 2 years ago). All of this is based on my own research and experiences. Ok so now we can get to the fun stuff!! This article is structured around questions I asked a lot and get asked a lot. So you can jump straight to the section that interests you: What is Ketosis? Why do you do it? How do you get into Ketosis? How do you know if you are in Ketosis? What is the difference between Keto/Paleo/Atkins/whatever other diet they will come up with next…. What can/ can’t I eat? How do you afford a Ketogenic eating plan? Do you cheat/ drink Alcohol at all? Is Ketosis dangerous? What is Ketosis? This is probably the question I get asked most. It usually goes with a bit of a confused look and a why the [email protected] would you want to do that expression (we’ll get to that in the 2nd question). To put it really simply, ketosis is changing the fuel source your body runs on. Your body is normally running in glycolysis, or a state where it gets it’s energy from blood glucose. When you go into ketosis you change that fuel source from glycogen to ketone bodies (fat). This means that the quantity of ketone bodies in the blood reached higher than normal levels(to be exact over 0.5 mM). When the body Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Been Able To Get Out Of Ketosis Safely? Did You Put On A Lot Of Weight? If So Or Not, What's Your Story While Trying To Leave Ketosis? - Keto

Has Anyone Been Able To Get Out Of Ketosis Safely? Did You Put On A Lot Of Weight? If So Or Not, What's Your Story While Trying To Leave Ketosis? - Keto

Has anyone been able to get out of ketosis safely? Did you put on a lot of weight? If so or not, what's your story while trying to leave ketosis? I'm surprised that nobody has commented yet about going on a paleo diet or somesuch. That's my plan, although I don't know how strict I'll be about it, when it comes to eating out. I'll still be sugar-free, and wheat-free. But I plan on eating more fruits, and honey, some (limited) grains... basically the "whole foods" approach. That's my plan too when I reach my goal. Switch over to something similar to paleo so I can get some natural sugars in. It's the one thing I do miss with keto...I enjoy my fruits. Every few months I go out. I'm at goal weight, I just enjoy eating keto. When I do go carby, the water weight that came off those first two weeks comes back, about 5-8 pounds, but I look exactly the same I get similar results. I have some variation in my weight, but after 1-3 days back in keto I'm back down to my low pretty fast. My younger brother is doing keto, so when I eat with him we do keto, but I'm not so strict when I'm at work or with my other family. Same here, I do roughly 1-3 months on, then accidentally go a day or two without carbs and piss like a race horse for an entire day. This is my indicator or getting back into ketosis, so I stick to it for minimum 30 days. I think taking breaks leads to an easier, albeit slower, weight loss on the mental side. I was three months on a textbook keto diet before Christmas. Then went apeshit crazy on all the cookies and cakes for a week between christmas and new years. I was not amused at how my body reacted to this shock. Checked the weigh after new years, lost/gained nothing. I did the same. Put on 15lbs. I'm just over a week into Keto again, and dropped 7lbs immediately. Continue reading >>

Here's How To Transition Off The Keto Diet (without Gaining Weight)

Here's How To Transition Off The Keto Diet (without Gaining Weight)

While clinical nutritionist Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNC, recommends the keto diet as a temporary diet, one of the biggest complaints in doing so is the immediate post-keto weight gain. So what happens when you forgo the high-fat lifestyle and go back to regular life? Do you just gain all the weight back? Dr. Axe has a strategy for transitioning out of ketosis. The key here is to not go from your (for most people, drastically different) diet back to your normal eating habits, especially if said habits were carb heavy with lots of processed sugars. In fact, Dr. Axe has noted that he's seen this same thing happen with thousands of clients, keto or otherwise: the second someone is done with a diet, they go ham with the unhealthy foods. It's not a hallmark of stopping keto but rather of stopping any kind of diet. However, since keto is such a specific diet with such unique parameters for macronutrients, he has a few eating and dieting techniques that he recommends for coming off keto: Paleo. First and foremost, he suggested transitioning from keto to Paleo. They're similarly low-carb, but Paleo is more maintainable for a long period of time with a good balance of essential macronutrients. Carb Cycling. This is a technique that Dr. Axe's wife uses for weight maintenance and health. He explains it in deeper detail on his website, but it generally consists of eating more carbs on certain days of the week and fewer on others. Dr. Axe told POPSUGAR that carb cycling is a great way to transition off of the keto diet. GAPS Diet. The GAPS diet focuses on promoting a healthy gut — anything from inflammatory bowel disease to leaky gut syndrome. On said diet, you avoid all processed foods and sugars, grains, starchy carbs and potatoes, and dairy. TCM. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM Continue reading >>

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Sponsored Content From buying all of the necessary supplies to becoming fully keto-adapted, you've done it all. Keto's been a fun ride and has given you a completely new perspective on the wide world of nutrition for optimal sports performance and health. But let's face it: there are weddings, reunions, and all sorts of social activities that can sometimes make it difficult to stay on a truly ketogenic diet at all times. Sometimes, life simply gets in the way. In this article, we'll outline tips to help you temporarily break ketosis without repercussions, explain the changes in your metabolism that might arise, and show how to slowly transition out of a fat loss phase into a lean mass gaining phase while still staying keto-adapted. Breaking ketosis does not necessarily mean that you are doomed to be out of ketosis indefinitely. In fact, for those of you who have been keto-adapted for an extended period of time, you will find that the longer you have been in ketosis, the easier it will be for you to get back into it after temporarily breaking it. There are some subtle tricks in order for you to break ketosis for a day or two and quickly get back into a fat burning state. Key #1: Break Keto on the Weekends While you can technically break ketosis at any point that you want to, most will find it best to do so on the weekend. Why? Weekends are when the vast majority of social gatherings take place. Weekdays usually mean regimented routines centered around a work day. That makes it easier to stick to a ketogenic diet because you’re in a groove and dialed into your routine. On the weekends, schedules tend to be more open. That makes those glorious two days the perfect time to let loose. So go ahead and enjoy some carbs with your friends and family! Key #2: Keep Your High Car Continue reading >>

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