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Clinical Manifestations Of Dka

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis, also referred to as simply ketoacidosis or DKA, is a serious and even life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes. DKA is rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA is caused when insulin levels are low and not enough glucose can get into the body's cells. Without glucose for energy, the body starts to burn fat for energy. Ketones are products that are created when the body burns fat. The buildup of ketones causes the blood to become more acidic. The high levels of blood glucose in DKA cause the kidneys to excrete glucose and water, leading to dehydration and imbalances in body electrolyte levels. Diabetic ketoacidosis most commonly develops either due to an interruption in insulin treatment or a severe illness, including the flu. What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The development of DKA is usually a slow process. However, if vomiting develops, the symptoms can progress more rapidly due to the more rapid loss of body fluid. Excessive urination, which occurs because the kidneys try to rid the body of excess glucose, and water is excreted along with the glucose High blood glucose (sugar) levels The presence of ketones in the urine Other signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis occur as the condition progresses: These include: Fatigue, which can be severe Flushing of the skin Fruity odor to the breath, caused by ketones Difficulty breathing Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication What should I do if I think I may have, or someone I know may diabetic ketoacidosis? You should test your urine for ketones if you suspect you have early symptoms or warning signs of ketoacidosis. Call your health-care professional if your urine shows high levels of ketones. High levels of ketones and high blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Summarized from Nyenwe E, Kitabchi A. The evolution of diabetic ketoacidosis: An update of its etiology, pathogenesis and management. Metabolism 2016; 65: 507-21 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of poorly controlled diabetes, is the subject of a recent comprehensive review article. The authors discuss epidemiological issues, revealing increasing incidence of DKA and decreasing mortality. Once inevitably fatal, DKA now has a reported mortality rate of <1 % in adults and 5 % in the elderly who also have one or more chronic illnesses, in addition to diabetes. They reveal that although DKA more commonly affects those with type 1 diabetes, around a third of cases occur in those with type 2 diabetes. This introductory section also reminds that DKA is characterized by the presence of three cardinal biochemical features: raised blood glucose (hyperglycemia); presence of ketones in blood and urine (ketonemia, ketonuria); and metabolic acidosis. Insulin deficiency is central to the development of these three biochemical abnormalities. The very rare occurrence of euglycemic DKA (DKA with normal blood glucose) is highlighted by reference to recent reports of this condition in patients treated with a relatively new class of antidiabetic drug (the SGLT 2 inhibitors) that reduces blood glucose by inhibiting renal reabsorption of glucose. There follows discussion of factors that precipitate DKA (omission or inadequate dosing of insulin, and infection are the most common triggers), and the possible mechanisms responsible for ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes. This latter condition, which was recognized as an entity only relatively recently, is distinguished by the development of severe but transient failure of pancreatic β-cells to m Continue reading >>

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

Clinical Signs

Clinical Signs

Go to site For Pet Owners Clinical signs exhibited by diabetic cats reflect the underlying pathological mechanisms of the disease and aid diagnosis. Of course, laboratory tests are needed to confirm diagnosis (see Diagnosis and Management Overview). Three distinct clinical pictures may develop in cats suffering from diabetes mellitus: Uncomplicated diabetes Complicated by ketoacidosis Hyperosmolar syndrome Clinical signs of uncomplicated diabetes The 4 classic clinical signs of diabetes mellitus in cats include: Polyuria Polyphagia Polydipsia Increased susceptibility to infections (eg, urinary tract infections) Owners may also notice weight loss in affected cats. Signs of diabetes mellitus complicated by ketoacidosis If feline diabetes is undetected and left untreated, it will shorten a cat’s lifespan. A dangerous, sometimes fatal metabolic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may develop. In untreated diabetic cats, excessive ketones are produced, resulting in ketonuria and DKA accompanied by electrolyte imbalances. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition that can ultimately lead to an acidotic coma and death. In addition to the classic clinical signs of diabetes, cats affected by DKA may present with: Loss of appetite Lethargy and depression Vomiting Diarrhea Weakness Dehydration Dyspnea Collapse or coma Signs of hyperosmolar syndrome Hyperosmolar syndrome is an uncommon complication of untreated diabetes mellitus. In animals in which target tissue resistance to insulin plays a role in the disease, insulin levels can be elevated. In these cases, ketosis is suppressed and plasma glucose concentrations can become very high. Hyperosmolar syndrome represents an emergency situation. Affected cats will become progressively weaker, anorexic, lethargic, and drink less. Ultim Continue reading >>

Clinical Features And Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Clinical Features And Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Less commonly, it can occur in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus. DKA is caused by absolute or relative insulin deficiency. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes".) The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus have increased across all ethnic groups. This has been coupled with an increasing awareness that children with type 2 diabetes mellitus can present with ketosis or DKA, particularly in obese African American adolescents [1-7]. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes", section on 'DKA in type 2 diabetes'.) The clinical features and diagnosis of DKA in children will be reviewed here. This discussion is primarily based upon the large collective experience of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. There is limited experience in the assessment and diagnosis of DKA in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus, although the same principles should apply. The management of diabetes in children, treatment of DKA in children and the epidemiology and pathogenesis of DKA are discussed separately. (See "Management of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents" and "Treatment and complications of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and adolescents" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis".) DEFINITION Diabetic ketoacidosis – A consensus statement from the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) in 2014 defined the following biochemical criteria for the diagnosis of DKA [8]: Hyperglycemia – Blood glucose of >200 mg/dL (11 mmol/L) AND Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Clinical Practice Guidelines

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Clinical Practice Guidelines

1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the most common endocrinal emergency remains a life-threatening condition despite improvements in diabetes care [1]. The mortality and morbidity rates remain high worldwide, especially in developing countries and among non-hospitalized patients [2,3], which highlight the importance of early diagnosis and implementation of effective preventive and management strategies. The adage "The child is not a miniature adult" is most appropriate when considering DKA. The fundamental pathophysiology of DKA is the same in children as in adults; however, the child differs from the adult in a number of characteristics which raise some important considerations in management [2]. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly review the pathophysiology of DKA and discuss recommended treatment protocols and current standards of care pertaining to children, adolescents and adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes presenting with DKA. The information provided is based on evidence from published studies and internationally accepted guidelines whenever possible and, when not, supported by expert opinion or consensus [1-5]. Current concepts of cerebral edema, recommendations and strategies for the prediction and prevention of DKA and hence its complications are finally presented. The considerations and recommendations included are in agreement with those endorsed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society (LWPES), European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology (ESPE), and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) [2-5]. Thus, this book chapter will provide easy and practical information to guide healthcare professional who manage DKA in all age groups. 2. Definition of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Clinical Features Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Clinical Features Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Clinical presentation of DKA may vary according to the severity and comorbid conditions. The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) usually develop rapidly over 1 day or less and may include: polyuria with polydipsia – commonest presenting symptom weight loss fatigue dyspnea vomiting preceding febrile illness abdominal pain polyphagia Patients may have tachycardia, poor skin turgor, dry mucous membranes, and orthostatic hypotension due to dehydration (1). Deep (Kussmaul) respirations are seen as a compensatory mechanism for metabolic acidosis (1) If severely ill, extreme cases may progress to shock, oliguria and anuria. The breath may have a distinctive fruity smell - ketotic breath; however the ability to detect this smell is absent is a sizeable proportion of the population - and, by extrapolation, the medical population. Mental status of patient may vary from confusion, drowsiness, progressive obtundation to loss of consciousness and coma (1,2) Note: nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain that may mimic an acute abdominal condition DKA may rarely be precipitated by sepsis, and fever is not part of DKA Reference: Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Case Study- Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Case Study- Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Case Details A 22- year-old diabetic comes to the Accident and Emergency department. She gives a 2-day history of vomiting and abdominal pain. She is drowsy and her breathing is deep and rapid. There is distinctive smell from her breath What is the most likely diagnosis? What is the biochemical basis for all the presenting symptoms? Which laboratory test would you request? Case discussion The patient is most probably suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis. She is a known diabetic and the presenting symptoms like abdominal pain, vomiting, rapid breathing and distinctive smell of breath, all indicate associated ketoacidosis. Basic concept Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a state of inadequate insulin levels resulting in high blood sugar and accumulation of organic acids and ketones in the blood. It is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. It happens predominantly in type 1 diabetes mellitus, but it can also occur in type 2 diabetes mellitus under certain circumstances. Causes- DKA occurs most frequently in knownDiabetics. It may also be the first presentation in patients who had not been previously diagnosed as diabetics. There is often a particular underlying problem that has led to DKA episode. This may be- 1) Inter current illness such as Pneumonia,Influenza, Gastroenteritis, Urinary tract infection or pregnancy. 2) Inadequate Insulin administration may be due to defective insulin pen device or in young patient intentional missing of dose due to fear of weight gain. 3) Associated myocardial infarction, stroke or use of cocaine 4) Inadequate food intake– may be due to anorexia associated with infective process or due to eating disorder in children. Diabetic keto acidosis may occur in those previously known to have diabetes mellitu Continue reading >>

Clinical Characteristics Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cross-sectional Study

Clinical Characteristics Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cross-sectional Study

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the most serious acute complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with T1D. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence and associated factors of DKA in children with newly diagnosed T1D in Addis Ababa. Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted in selected hospitals in Addis Ababa. Children below the age of 12 years with DKA who were admitted to the pediatric ward in the selected hospitals between January 2009 and December 2014 and the residence of Addis Ababa were included. DKA was defined as children below the age of 12 years who have blood glucose level ≥250mg/dl, ketonuria, and ketonemia and diagnosed being T1D patient for the first time. Descriptive statistics was performed using frequency distribution, mean, median, tables, and graphs. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with the prevalence of DKA in children with newly diagnosed T1D. Of 395 DKA patients who were hospitalized during the five-year period, 142(35.8%) presented with DKA at first diagnosis of diabetes. On the other hand 253 (64.2%) children with DKA had longstanding T1D. Independent factors associated with DKA include: Age category 2–4.49years, 7–9.49 years and ≥9.5years (Adjusted odd ratio (AOR) = 3.14[1.21,8.06]), 3.44(1.39,8.49) and 4.02(1.68,9.60), respectively); parents’ knowledge on the sign and symptoms of DKA (AOR = 0.51[0.27, 0.95]); sign and symptoms of DKA before the onset of DKA (AOR = 0.35[0.21, 0.59]) and infection prior to DKA onset (AOR = 3.45[1.97, 6.04]). The overall proportion of children diagnosed with DKA and new onset of T1D in Addis Ababa was high. In particular, children between 9–12 years of age Continue reading >>

Clinical Signs Of Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Clinical Signs Of Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Clinical signs are useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of canine and feline diabetes. Other laboratory tests are also necessary for diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and the monitoring of treated diabetic pets. There are three distinct clinical pictures in diabetes mellitus: Uncomplicated diabetes mellitus The classical signs are Polyuria, Polydipsia, Polyphagia, Cachexia and increased susceptibility to infections (e.g. urinary tract infections). In long term diabetes, effects due to protein glycosylation can be seen: cataracts (mainly in dogs) and peripheral neuropathy (mainly in cats). Diabeties complicated by ketoacidosis DKA develops due to long standing undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, insufficient insulin dose in treated diabetics and impaired insulin action and/or resistance, caused by obesity, concurrent illness or drugs. This is the cause of more than two thirds of cases of DKA. Due to the lack of insulin, glucose cannot be used as an energy source. Fats are broken down to provide energy. During lipolysis, high levels of ketones are produced. Ketosis and acidosis develop and are accompanied by electrolyte imbalances. Ketosis causes anorexia, nausea and lethargy. Diagnosis The diagnosis of DKA is based on the presence of ketonuria along with signs of systemic illness. Treatment DKA is an emergency and treatment must be started as soon as possible. The goals of treatment are to correct fluid deficits, acid-base balance and electrolyte balance, lower blood glucose and ketone concentrations and recognize and correct underlying and precipitating factors. Therapy includes intravenous fluid therapy with isotonic fluids, e.g. 0.9% saline, and intravenous administration of rapid-acting insulin. If possible the electrolyte concentrations and acid-base balance should be mea Continue reading >>

Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Authors: Katia M. Lugo-Enriquez, MD, FACEP, Faculty, Florida Hospital Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Orlando, FL. Nick Passafiume, MD, Florida Hospital Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Orlando, FL. Peer Reviewer: Richard A. Brodsky, MD, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Assistant Professor, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Children with diabetes, especially type 1, remain at risk for developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This may seem confounding in a modern society with such advanced medical care, but the fact remains that children who are type 1 diabetics have an incidence of DKA of 8 per 100 patient years.1 In fact, Neu and colleagues have noted in a multicenter analysis of 14,664 patients in Europe from 1995 to 2007 that there was no significant change in ketoacidosis presenting at diabetes onset in children.2 In children younger than 19 years old, DKA is the admitting diagnosis in 65% of all hospital admissions of patients with diabetes mellitus.3 This article reviews the presentation, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and potential complications associated with pediatric DKA. — The Editor Introduction The overall mortality rate for children in DKA is not unimpressive: The range is 0.15% to 0.31%.4 Besides death, one of the most feared repercussions of DKA in children is cerebral edema, an entity that occurs approximately 1% of the time.5,6 Cerebral edema, with the exception of a few case reports in some young adults, has largely been a complication of treatment in the pediatric population, and the exact factors have yet to be completely determined. The mortality associated with cerebral edema may approach 20% to 50%, and the incidence of neurologic morbidity is significant and Continue reading >>

Dka Vs Hhs (hhns) Nclex Review

Dka Vs Hhs (hhns) Nclex Review

Diabetic ketoacidosis vs hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS): What are the differences between these two complications of diabetes mellitus? This NCLEX review will simplify the differences between DKA and HHNS and give you a video lecture that easily explains their differences. Many students get these two complications confused due to their similarities, but there are major differences between these two complications. After reviewing this NCLEX review, don’t forget to take the quiz on DKA vs HHNS. Lecture on DKA and HHS DKA vs HHNS Diabetic Ketoacidosis Affects mainly Type 1 diabetics Ketones and Acidosis present Hyperglycemia presents >300 mg/dL Variable osmolality Happens Suddenly Causes: no insulin present in the body or illness/infection Seen in young or undiagnosed diabetics Main problems are hyperglycemia, ketones, and acidosis (blood pH <7.35) Clinical signs/symptoms: Kussmaul breathing, fruity breath, abdominal pain Treatment is the same as in HHNS (fluids, electrolyte replacement, and insulin) Watch potassium levels closely when giving insulin and make sure the level is at least 3.3 before administrating. Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome Affects mainly Type 2 diabetics No ketones or acidosis present EXTREME Hyperglycemia (remember heavy-duty hyperglycemia) >600 mg/dL sometimes four digits High Osmolality (more of an issue in HHNS than DKA) Happens Gradually Causes: mainly illness or infection and there is some insulin present which prevents the breakdown of ketones Seen in older adults due to illness or infection Main problems are dehydration & heavy-duty hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity (because the glucose is so high it makes the blood very concentrated) More likely to have mental status changes due to severe dehydrat Continue reading >>

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