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Causes Of Metabolic Acidosis

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What is BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What does BASAL METABOLIC RATE mean? BASAL METABOLIC RATE meaning - BASAL METABOLIC RATE definition - BASAL METABOLIC RATE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(hkg)). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met. These criteria include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, while in the post-absorptive state (i.e., not actively digesting food). In bradymetabolic animals, such as fish and reptiles, the equivalent term standard metabolic rate (SMR) is used. It follows the same criteria as BMR, but requires the documentation of the temperature at which the metabolic rate was measured. This makes BMR a variant of standard metabolic rate measurement that excludes the temperature data, a practice that has led to problems in defining "standard" rates of metabolism for many mammals. Metabolism comprises the processes that the body needs to function. Basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 12% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high. The body's generation of heat is known as thermogenesis and it can be measured to determine the amount of energy expended. BMR generally decreases with age and with the decrease in lean body mass (as may happen with aging). Increasing muscle mass has the effect of increasing BMR. Aerobic (resistance) fitness level, a product of cardiovascular exercise, while previously thought to have effect on BMR, has been shown in the 1990s not to correlate with BMR when adjusted for fat-free body mass. But anaerobic exercise does increase resting energy consumption (see "aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise"). Illness, previously consumed food and beverages, environmental temperature, and stress levels can affect one's overall energy expenditure as well as one's BMR. BMR is measured under very restrictive circumstances when a person is awake. An accurate BMR measurement requires that the person's sympathetic nervous system not be stimulated, a condition which requires complete rest. A more common measurement, which uses less strict criteria, is resting metabolic rate (RMR).

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cau Continue reading >>

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  1. Beck01

    ......for non bodybuilders????
    My husband is a bodybuilder and has followed a Ketogenic Diet on and off for years. I've watched him in amazement morphing his body in very little time (but lots of effort) His diet is something like this:
    Mon and Tues 75% fat; 25% protein; under 20g of carbs
    Wed, Thurs and Fri 75% protein; 25% fat; under 20g of carbs
    Sat and Sun he 'carbs up' and eats anything and everything under the sun.
    I've recently noticed that I've put on about 30lbs in the last 8 months or so. I quit smoking and the weight came on like a freight train. I tried upping my exercise and lowering my over all calories and I had little success stopping the fat train so I decided that I would follow a modified version of what my husband does.
    I don't lift weights at all. I do Ashtanga yoga 6 days a week and walk at least 3 miles a day, 5 days a week. And yes, Ashtanga yoga (aka power yoga) is more than a little stretching.
    So far ketosis has worked better than I thought it would but my question is.... What will happen if I 'carb up' with my husband? I have no intention of eating like he does (I don't think I could if I tried... the man can eat) but he thinks we should be able to treat our self’s at least once a week. I'm not convinced that I want to come out of ketosis and then whack my self back in on Monday. I only started this last Sunday and today is the first day I woke up and actually felt ok.
    I'm looking for others to share there experience with Cyclic Ketogenic or just to hear what happened if they pigged out on carbs for a day and then went back to a strict keto diet.
    Please any and all thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

  2. Gymrat

    I am doing your husbands diet and this is my second carb up was in ketosis for 4 days before my last carb up and this time I went 5 days.I think its working out pretty good for me,will go back to low carb on monday.

  3. Helen H

    CKD works best if you are lifting hard. If you are something something of equivelent intensity, maybe karate, then it will work. You'll have to judge yourself how your yoga compares. 3 miles a day of walking is good, but it's not enough to warrent a big carb-up.
    As I know to my cost, women can't carb-up the way men can. I'm really sorry, but if you start eating anything and everything, you'll undo all your work. What you can do is to reverse your normal keto diet, and spend one day a week (or even one day in every 10) eating a high carb, low fat diet at maintenance calories or very slightly above. But you'll have to keep it as clean as possible, and avoid all the junk and sugary foods.
    The general rule with carb-ups is that the harder you work in the gym and the more muscle mass you carry, the more you can carb-up.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

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  1. GMX

    I've been ketoing now almost 5 weeks but have been struggling to get my fasting blood glucose down. This morning my blood ketones registered at .8 but my blood glucose was 122. I'm eating about 90-100g protein a day but I weigh 217. Is it still just too much protein? Carb intake is negligible. Fat intake is probably 250g a day. Any thoughts? Thanks.

  2. Mare

    For your weight, that does not seem like a lot of protein to me. I weigh 145, and I've calculated my minimum protein at 60g and can go as high as 100g.
    As to blood glucose, there's a phenomenon with ketosis where fasting BG is elevated, but it is benign. Peter at Hyperlipid had a post on his blog some time ago that provided the science behind this, but I could not follow it. This may be what you're experiencing.

    My endo told me that this is true, and he goes by my A1C rather than my fasting because of this.

  3. carolT

    Protein could be lower if you are female (sorry, can't tell) and/or not exercising, but the ketone level indicates you are accessing some fat overnight.

    Have you taken glucose readings at night or before your main meal? Are they lower? You may be experiencing "dawn phenomenon" where glucose is higher in the morning because 1.) the same hormones that wake you up also give you some extra glucose to start the day or 2.) your glucose dropped overnight and your body reacts by making more of it. Also, if you happen to get up in the middle of the night, you could see what your glucose is doing before your normal waking time.

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The Pharmacotherapy Preparatory Review Recertification Course Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders PDF at https://www.mediafire.com/view/8kucuu...

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metab Continue reading >>

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  1. Eugene

    I HATE being in ketosis. I tried it many many times but it just doesn't feel natural. My sleep gets fucked up, my brain foggy, my motivation suffers, etc etc... And YES I did give enough time for induction period and I did feel better but not perfect. Plus occasionally its impossible to not mess up and you are back to going through induction hell once again.
    I still want the benefits of no grains, no omega 6, etc etc... Without being in Ketosis because I feel much better just out of ketosis then I ever do in full blown ketosis. Also I feel great after accidental fasts like when i go to college without eating anything all day.
    So basically my question is -- what are the best sources of carbs outside of green vegetables like broccoli to get enough carbs to keep the hell out of ketosis, and have enough carbs for weight training. How much carbs from fruits is too much and what fruits are to avoid?
    For now the staples of my diet is broccoli, garlic, onions, avacados, grapefruits, eggs, bacon, beef, cheese.
    Btw, I am by no means fat, but I never seem to go below a certain fat %, even in full ketosis. Like there is slight fat over abbs no matter what I do. I realized recently that i was making a few mistakes in my diet such as eating mayo (omega6) and peanut-butter(legumes with high lectin count and anti-nutrients) so that might explain why. I've heard fasts are good for last stubborn fat; is that true?
    Any opinions? Thanks!
    Also I would like to warn others who eat peanut-butter and peanuts on paleo or keto diet --peanut butter is PEAS not NUTS and thus have their share of anti-nutrients, lectins, etc...
    Is there such thing as almond butter?

  2. prophets

    Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for NUTRITION to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

  3. oehaut

    Eugene, on Feb 26 2010, 08:30 PM, said:

    I HATE being in ketosis. I tried it many many times but it just doesn't feel natural. My sleep gets fucked up, my brain foggy, my motivation suffers, etc etc... And YES I did give enough time for induction period and I did feel better but not perfect. Plus occasionally its impossible to not mess up and you are back to going through induction hell once again.
    I still want the benefits of no grains, no omega 6, etc etc... Without being in Ketosis because I feel much better just out of ketosis then I ever do in full blown ketosis. Also I feel great after accidental fasts like when i go to college without eating anything all day.
    So basically my question is -- what are the best sources of carbs outside of green vegetables like broccoli to get enough carbs to keep the hell out of ketosis, and have enough carbs for weight training. How much carbs from fruits is too much and what fruits are to avoid?
    For now the staples of my diet is broccoli, garlic, onions, avacados, grapefruits, eggs, bacon, beef, cheese.
    Btw, I am by no means fat, but I never seem to go below a certain fat %, even in full ketosis. Like there is slight fat over abbs no matter what I do. I realized recently that i was making a few mistakes in my diet such as eating mayo (omega6) and peanut-butter(legumes with high lectin count and anti-nutrients) so that might explain why. I've heard fasts are good for last stubborn fat; is that true?
    Any opinions? Thanks!
    Also I would like to warn others who eat peanut-butter and peanuts on paleo or keto diet --peanut butter is PEAS not NUTS and thus have their share of anti-nutrients, lectins, etc...
    Is there such thing as almond butter?
    Why are you trying to be that low-carb? Do you have insulin resistance or glycemic control problem? Otherwise just add back quinoa, oat and rice. Just a serving of oat in the morning should keep you out of ketosis. I don't know what is you BF%, but to a certain point you need muscularity to make it come down very low. Do you weight train? Getting rid of the stubborn fat asks for hardcore dieting with a clever training program plan. I don't see what the fat would have to do with it since it all come down to adreno-receptors. Maybe there's a link i'm not aware tho.
    Also, peanut have a fair amount of positive studies for many aspect of health, including weight control.

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