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Carb Intolerance After Keto

Is A Low-carb Diet Ruining Your Health?

Is A Low-carb Diet Ruining Your Health?

I am adding some research gathered from other posts on this site regarding Candida, as I suspect it will help people whose Candida infections are getting worse, or are not improving, while on a low carb diet. As Jeff Leach has pointed out, when people switch to very low carb diets their fermentation drops considerably — which means that there is less acid being produced as Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs). Candida is a dimorphic fungus, which means that it can be either benign or pathogenic (extending hyphae). Candida is only hyphal when it gut pH is extremely acidic (somewhat rare, but can happen with gut diseases like ulcerative colitis) or too alkaline (which happens from not eating enough resistant starches and fibers). If you read through the half dozen studies in that link, you’ll see that Candida has a number of growth genes that are sensitive to pH. These hyphal growth genes switch on when gut pH is too high or too low. In other words, Candida is benign when gut pH is normal. It’s the SCFAs from our fiber and RS fermentation that keep our guts slightly acidic. And it’s no coincidence that acids like acetate or caprylic acid are well known to inactivate candida. Virtually any acid would inactivate candida and it’s the SCFAs from our own gut bugs that do a particularly good job. So, people on very low carb diets have guts that aren’t fermenting and are therefore too alkaline, which as we can see from above promotes candida overgrowth. For these people, increasing their safe starch consumption and taking RS will increase SCFA (acid) production, which helps normalize gut pH and switch off the candida growth genes — returning candida to its benign and harmless state. Simultaneously, RS and fibers tends to bloom good bacteria (which also contributes to in Continue reading >>

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted or keto adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. It also improves cellular healing and mitochondrial biogenesis which supports stronger and healthier cells. All of this leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). Where Ketosis Can Be Extremely Beneficial There are certain cases, where I typically recommend a ketogenic diet as the research appears to support that ketosis significantly improves the functionality of these individuals. Overweight or Obese Neurodegenerative Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Most Cancers but especially those of the brain, nervous system and blood (leukemia) Chronic Pain Seizure Disorders Non-Elite athletes or individuals looking for higher mental & physical performance The final one is the area that I and many others who have pursued a state of ketosis fall into. At this point in my life, I have no chronic diseases, I feel great 99% of the time, but I am always looking to improve my productivity and performance. I have found being in mild-ketosis to be one of the best ways to improve my energy, mental acuity, creativity, physical strength and overall life performance. There is no one diet that works perfectly for everyone. Ketosis has the potential to benefit everyone, but under unique circumstances it would not be warranted. Here are a list of special cases where long-term st Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

One of the biggest reasons why people go Paleo is the metabolic benefits. Most people find Paleo to be very therapeutic for a whole cluster of carb-related problems: high blood sugar (or the rollercoaster of highs and lows), insulin resistance, and all the related issues. These issues can make weight loss difficult or impossible, but on the flip side, addressing them through diet can make it easier and more pleasant than you ever thought could happen! On the other hand, though, there are a lot of myths and half-truths floating around about diet, exercise, and carb metabolism. So here’s a quick review of what it all means, and the evidence supporting various different complementary strategies for improving your carb tolerance (preview: it’s so much more than dietary carbs). Note: This article is not written for diabetics. Diabetes is a very complicated disease and strategies that are right for other people might not be appropriate. If you have diabetes, see a doctor! What Is “Carb Tolerance”/Insulin Sensitivity? (If you already know how insulin and glucose work, this section has nothing new for you; just skip down to the next one) Very simply put, insulin sensitivity (or “carb tolerance” in everyday language) is a healthy hormonal state that allows your body to digest and store carbohydrates without a problem. In healthy people, here’s how it works: You eat something with carbs (let’s say a potato, but it could be anything). Your digestive system breaks down the starch in that potato into glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar – this is the form of carbohydrate that you’ll either use for energy or store as fat. Your blood sugar temporarily rises as the glucose enters the bloodstream. This is not a big problem, because… Insulin (produced in the pancreas) Continue reading >>

Stop Eating Low-carb (if You Care About Your Thyroid)

Stop Eating Low-carb (if You Care About Your Thyroid)

This is Part 3 of a 3-part series on overcoming hypothyroidism: Part 1 – How We Overcome Hypothyroidism When All Else Fails… Part 2 – How to Heal Your Thyroid By Healing Your Liver Part 3 – [You Are Here] – Stop Eating Low-Carb (If You Care About Your Thyroid) The myth has long since been debunked. But unfortunately, some fads stick around long past their welcome. I’m talking about the low-carb diet myth. I understand the thought process and why it’s still hanging around. Weight gain is a common symptom of hypothyroidism (yet, so is excessive weight loss). And low-carb diets promote short term weight loss. So, it must be healthy for your thyroid, right? Well, you can also lose weight instantly by cutting off your left arm. But that won’t help your thyroid either. Don’t worry I fell for it too, many years ago. And unfortunately I had to learn this hard way like so many others. Long ago, I spent a couple of years following a low-carb diet. And I stuck through it because at the time the doctors and practitioners I was studying believed it was the key to health. As I watched my health fall apart during those years, it was obvious that my thyroid took a turn for the worse. My body temperature plummeted. My hands and feel were always cold. I crashed as soon as I walked in the door from work. I couldn’t handle a bit of stress and felt overwhelmed with just about everything in life. The list goes on and on… Little did I know, my low-carb diet was ruining my thyroid. And I’m not the only one. Today, low-carb diets are commonly recommended for hypothyroidism sufferers. At least half of the clients I work have either tried in the past or come to me while following a low-carb diet of some sort. And while many do feel better initially, it’s not because of a Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Carbohydrates & Sinus Problems

The Connection Between Carbohydrates & Sinus Problems

People with sinus problems often experience congestion, irritation, runny nose, frequent cough and facial pressure. The condition can be caused by a wide variety of factors, from seasonal allergies to food sensitivities. In fact, there are a few suggested connections between sinus problems and carbohydrates. Although it’s not healthy to eliminate all carbs from your diet, restricting your intake to complex carbohydrates could improve your symptoms. Video of the Day Carbohydrates are not known to cause sinus problems in everyone. In fact, many people eat carbohydrates regularly with no obvious side effects. However, some people have a specific sensitivity to carbs. Similar to a food allergy, this sensitivity causes an abnormal physiologic reaction to occur when carbohydrates are consumed. For some people, this reaction involves sinus congestion or infection. If you believe a carbohydrate sensitivity could be the cause of your sinus problems, consult with your physician for a proper treatment plan and healthy sinus diet. In some cases, sinus problems might be caused by a problem with fungus, according to the Oasis Advanced Wellness website. The mouth and nose are common ports of entry for fungi and other bacteria. Typically, the natural body defenses protect us against the microorganisms and prevent them from harming our health. In some cases, though, our body environment is not conducive for these protective behaviors. According to the website, carbohydrates provide a large amount of sugar for these fungi to feast on. By eliminating carbohydrates, you can eliminate the main food source for the fungi – and hopefully eliminate them altogether. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledges that carbohydrates can be classified into two types: simple carbohy Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

I had a question for anyone who had gone VLC or Keto and then decided to add fruit or sweet potato back in. I bloat when I eat carbs (possible intolerance?) and am wondering if this could be a simple adaptation period or if you can actually create carb intolerance by going VLC for a longer period of time? I am a semi professional athlete training twice per day, and am thinking of adding more carbs to help with recovery (I am very sore and it is starting to affect sleep). 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Thoughts and experiences? Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

In my previous post, How to Exercise on a Keto Diet, I outlined the some of the basic facts about exercise and the most common myths. In this and future posts, I'd like to focus on nutrition aspects of exercise. Foods containing carbs are not all evil and I'll explain when clean paleo-friendly carbs can be used even on a keto diet. Let's start by busting some of the most common myths... Carbs and Performance Do we need carbs for better performance? One of the most common myths is that low-carb eating will negatively affect your performance. This is down to studies that ignore keto-adaptation and only focus on the immediate effects of carb restriction. There is, indeed, a transitional period in which performance drop occurs but it only lasts for a few weeks. Once you get keto-adapted (usually 3-4 weeks), your body will switch from using glucose to using ketones and fatty acids as the main source of energy. This study performed on elite athletes shows that a keto diet does not affect strength performance. Eight athletes over a period of 30 days were fed virtually a zero carb diet and didn't experience any drop in performance. In fact, more and more studies are showing the beneficial effects of keto-adaptation. Even athletes that are doing very long cardio training or marathons can follow a keto diet. Timothy Allen Olson is just one of the many super athletes who have proven to be thriving almost purely on a diet that is best described as low-carb, keto and paleo. However, Timothy doesn't follow a standard ketogenic diet - he eats carbs strategically. Before or after his workouts he eats clean carbs such as sweet potatoes and fruits. He also uses glucose gels on training runs. Everyone is different and although some may thrive on a Standard Ketogenic Diet, others may benef Continue reading >>

Keto Problems: Food Allergies & Sensitivities

Keto Problems: Food Allergies & Sensitivities

Welcome to Keto Sister. If you are new to ketogenic nutrition and want to know what this is all about, I invite you to start with my Keto Basics series. Its written in plain English for those who don’t understand high brow scientific or nutrition speak and just want a plain explanation of keto. It explains the what and why of nutritional ketosis, and also how to modify the diet for your personal needs. This week’s post continues my Keto Problems series. While also applicable to those not eating a low carb diet, I find that it becomes a particularly relevant topic when you begin to eat a low carb diet. And this knowledge could save your life one day. I want to explain how to determine whether you have a reaction to a certain food and what to do about it. Allergy or sensitivity? There are clinical differences between having an allergic reaction and a sensitivity in response to eating a food. With an allergic reaction, the immune system becomes involved in how your body responds to a food (Ferguson, 1992). If your response to eating a food is to develop an immediate urgent reaction (urticaria or hives, throat closing, wheezing, inability to breathe) or a chronic reaction (eczema, asthma, flushed cheeks, sinusitis), then you are in fact having an allergic reaction to a food. Urgent reactions cause the release of histamine in the body and cause a systemic reaction (AAFA, 2017). These are often easily identified because they require immediate medical attention and often cause us to fear for our lives (I have a severe allergic reaction to shrimp so I have experienced this first hand). Without a personalized epinephrine injector (epipen), many of us would be in serous trouble after being exposed to an allergen. Those of us who have more chronic reactions to food can confuse Continue reading >>

Carb Intolerance Q&a (landing)

Carb Intolerance Q&a (landing)

The Carb Intolerance Quiz is currently undergoing a makeover! Please read the Q&A and return to visit this page next week! Q&A of Carb Intolerance “Insulin resistance equals carbohydrate intolerance In the body, excess carbohydrate calories cause insulin to be released which stops the fat burning process. Cells in our muscles and liver (and other tissues) also down-regulate their normal response to insulin causing a condition called insulin resistance. This causes blood sugar levels to increase and other problems associated with metabolic syndrome. In this way, insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome can be more accurately described as carbohydrate intolerance. If you have this condition, you tend to divert a greater percentage of the carbohydrate you eat into fat. Over time, this causes collateral damage that ends up as metabolic syndrome” Dr Jeff Volek PhD The most important thing you need to know about Carbohydrate Intolerance, is that it will always negatively affect the quality of your life! Carbohydrate Intolerance or CI is a sign of your times: When the average person consumes about 160 lbs. of sugar a year, Vs the 1 lb. our bodies are genetically designed for, it can only mean trouble! Carbohydrate Intolerance is the premise for many serious health conditions. Because of the difficulty in a true medical diagnosis, especially in the early stages, CI can easily develop in devastating conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Luckily it is much easier to detect and fix this problem from the nutritional perspective than from the medical. Here are a few things the people often ask me about CI and how to resolve it: Q: How can carbohydrate cause so many problems, when they are a necessary part of your diet? A: Actually Carbohydrates are absolutely not necessary Continue reading >>

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

Ketogenic eating might just be the most popular idea in the unconventional health and fitness movement right now. I get dozens of emails a week from people asking for Keto tips and tricks. I’m not convinced that most of these people should be Keto though. It’s been billed as a great way to lose weight, which has attracted a lot of attention, but it’s not all roses, unicorns, and fairy dust. Here’s three reasons why you might want to reconsider your plan to go Keto… 1. Ketogenic eating is obsessive. When I interviewed Jimmy Moore, author of Keto Clarity, this is one of the issues I brought up. Ketosis is notoriously difficult to get into, verify, and sustain without bringing back some of the old, obsessive Dieting strategies that we’ve been working hard to get away from. Tracking macros, monitoring blood glucose, and testing ketone levels are all required steps in the process for most people. This kind of protocol attracts people with disordered eating habits. It’s the perfect blend of effective, obsessive, and new. If you’re trying to get into ketosis for medical reasons, then you’ve gotta do what you’ve gotta do. If you want to get into ketosis because you heard it’s great for weight loss or for some other non-medical reason, it’s too obsessive for my taste. 2. Ketogenic eating probably doesn’t fit your lifestyle. You know me—I’m not a huge fan of cardio or long workouts. I’m bearish on exercise as a modern concept, but I’m bullish on functional fitness and DWYLT. In other words, I want people to do active things they love with a little sprinting and short functional strength workouts thrown in. In order to actually enjoy those things and feel strong and healthy when doing them, you’ll need adequate glycogen. That’s something that Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Intolerance & Insulin Resistance

Carbohydrate Intolerance & Insulin Resistance

Carbohydrate intolerance simply means that carbohydrates, (sugars and starches in the diet), are not tolerated as well by the body as they should be. The complex part is figuring out why this is the case and to what extent they are affecting your health and your lifestyle. If left untreated, carbohydrate intolerance, can result in many varied symptoms including: hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, polycystic ovaries, breast cancer, high blood cholesterol, pain and inflammation, Type II diabetes (“adult-onset”), obesity, stroke, and coronary heart disease. This is because all these problems are related to something called insulin resistance, which first starts as carbohydrate intolerance. Insulin resistance is a process in which the body is inefficient at managing sugars and starches you have eaten in your diet. When you eat a carbohydrate, such as a piece of bread or something sweet like ice cream, your body releases insulin from your pancreas to process that sugar. Without insulin, you would not be able to assimilate this sugar, called glucose, from your blood stream into your liver and muscles. With insulin resistance, your body makes too much insulin for the amount of carbohydrate consumed. This extra insulin is what causes so many of the listed problems, both functional problems (those which precede pathological), as well as pathological problems (those with tissue alterations). Initially, the extra insulin often ends up processing sugar too rapidly and blood glucose levels are driven too low. This is called hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. This adds stress to the body and causes the production of other hormones (especially adrenal gland hormones like cortisol), which increase blood sugar levels. As carbohydrate intolerance gets worse, more and more insulin is neede Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

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