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Canine Ketoacidosis Recovery

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Prolonged Ketosis In A Patient With Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis Secondary To Dapagliflozin

Prolonged Ketosis in a Patient With Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis Secondary to Dapagliflozin Shreya Pujara , MD1 and Adriana Ioachimescu , MD, PhD1 Shreya Pujara, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Email: [email protected] Received 2016 Dec 30; Revised 2017 Apr 17; Accepted 2017 Apr 23. Copyright 2017 American Federation for Medical Research This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License ( ) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages ( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Since the approval of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors by the US Food and Drug Administration for type 2 diabetes, there have been several reports of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis in patients using this class of medication. We present a case of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis where ketonemia and glucosuria persisted well beyond the expected effect of dapagliflozin. Our patient is a 50-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes since age 35 who was taking metformin and dapagliflozin. She p Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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Canine Diabetes Symptoms Click here: http://bit.ly/Canine-Diabetes-Symptoms dog diabetes symptoms canine diabetes symptoms of canine diabetes diabetes 2 symptoms diabetes symptoms in women diabetes in dogs symptoms dog diabetes symptoms canine diabetes diabetes 1 type one diabetes diabetes mellitus type 2 diabetes mellitus type 1 type ii diabetes d?abetes mell?tus type i diabetes how do you get diabetes diabetes type 1 symptoms diabetes journal signs and symptoms of diabetes juvenile diabetes symptoms symptoms of type 1 diabetes type 2 diabetes causes diabetes signs diabetes type 1 and 2 define diabetes diabetes and alcohol causes of type 2 diabetes what causes type 2 diabetes definition of diabetes diabetes type brittle diabetes diabetes diagnosis risk factors for diabetes signs of type 2 diabetes what are diabetes diagnosis of diabetes type 1 diabetes mellitus causes of diabetes type 2 causes of type 1 diabetes nick jonas diabetes type 1 diabetes causes what causes type 1 diabetes diabetes type ii different types of diabetes diabetes symptoms type 2 symptoms of diabetes in women type one diabetes symptoms symptoms type 2 diabetes diabetes in pregnancy early signs of diabetes what

Canine Ketoacidosis

"Canine Ketoacidosis is the result of no treatment or ineffective treatment of diabetes. Symptoms include those associated with diabetes such as weight loss and excessive thirst and those associated with Ketoacidosis such as abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. Emergency treatment is sometimes needed. Long term care requires the identification and treatment of any underlying triggers followed by steps to address the diabetes such as insulin therapy. Once treated the prognosis for recovery is positive." Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that occurs in diabetic dogs. The diabetes deprives the body of much needed glucose, the energy source used by cells. Without energy from glucose, the body will look for alternative sources such as the fat that is stored in the body. Your dog's body will start to break down the fats causing small deposits to accumulate in the blood. These deposits are called ketones. The condition is called canine Ketoacidosis. Since the sugar cannot enter the cells it builds up in the blood causing a condition called hyperglycemia. Ketocacidosis can be caused by untreated diabetes or ineffective treatment of canine diabetes such as insulin therapy that i Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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For more information on this, visit the link below: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Warning Signs of Diabetes in Dogs 1. Weakness or Fatigue 2. Increased Thirst 3. Increased Urination 4. Increased Hunger 5. Sudden Weight Loss 6. Obesity 7. Thinning or Dull Hair 8. Cloudy Eyes 9. Vomiting http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-w... Nicolas, selected from petMD Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Is your dog consuming lots of water...more than you think is normal? Eating too much? Frequently urinating? He might have diabetes. Sugar diabetes, more specifically known as canine diabetes, is a common disease to dogs. It is a hormonal disorder that affects dogs of ages 5 to 9. Some species like German Shepherd, Poodles, Keeshonden and Golden Retrievers register the highest incidence of this disease. Obese dogs also stand a greater risk of being diabetic. The ratio of female to male infected with the disease is 3:1. This book addresses the most conspicuous symptoms of diabetes in dogs, the main causes, and how to effectively treat it.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments Diabetic ketoacidosis in dogs, sometimes shortened to DKA, is a deadly medical emergency that happens when there is not enough insulin in the body toregulate levels of blood sugar known as glucose. It is a complication of diabetes mellitus that requires immediate medical treatment before it becomes fatal. When insulin levels drop, the body cant use glucose properly, so glucose builds up in the bloodwhile the liver produces ketone bodiesto act as an emergency fuel source. When ketone bodies are broken down, they cause the bodys pH balance to shift and become more acidic. Dogs cant maintain their fluid and electrolyte balance, which results in deadly symptoms. If your dog shows signs of diabetic ketoacidosis , especially if they have been diagnosed with diabetes, it is important that you see an emergency veterinarian right away for treatment. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for diabetic ketoacidosis in dogs. Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs Sometimes dogs that suffer from diabetic ketoacidosis only show mild symptoms, but the majority of affected animals get very sick withi Continue reading >>

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  1. heatherny2

    My yorkipoo, Rusty, was just diagnosed today and not given a good prognosis. His glucose level was over 400 and ketones were present in his urine. The vet wanted to send him to a specialist to be watched over the weekend, but I can't afford that. We will administer insulin over the weekend, testing him every few hours, and see how he does. He has already developed the cataracts, but is eating and acting fine, so i just didn't have the heart to euthanize him today without giving him a chance over the weekend. My sons will just be devastated if he doesn't pull through.
    Anyone had any experience with this and if so, what was the outcome? Oh, and maybe some jingles will help.

  2. McVillesMom

    I worked with a number of DKA dogs when I was a tech in an emergency/referral hospital. Most of them were in the CCU, unfortunately, and some of them did survive, but it's usually very touch and go for a while. It sounds as though your guy is in better shape than most of my patients were - a lot of them were flat out, essentially comatose, so the fact that he is still eating and acting fine is a good sign. Hopefully, since you just found out, you will be able to get his glucose regulated and he'll do well - just keep a VERY close eye on him and do NOT hesitate to call or take him somewhere if you think he isn't right - they can crash very, very fast.

  3. heatherny2

    Thank you. Yeah, he is acting as normal as he always was, and eating really well (in fact he really likes the special food they gave us). He is also getting used to his glucose testing (with help from DH and a friend). We are, however, all watching him for any changes, so we can immediately get it addressed.

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