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Canine Ketoacidosis Recovery

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Moof's Medical Biochemistry Video Course: http://moof-university.thinkific.com/... In this video, I describe how Ketone Bodies are oxidized for energy. The liver makes ketone bodies that travel through the blood to extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized in the mitochondrial matrix to give energy. The pathway begins with D--Hydroxybutyrate, as it is oxidized to Acetoacetate by the same D--Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase reaction (except in reverse). The Acetoacetate is then activated to Acetoacetyl-CoA by -Ketoacyl-CoA Transferase (also known as Thiophorase); this second step takes a Coenzyme A from Succinyl-CoA (an intermediate of the Krebs Cycle). The Acetoacetyl-CoA is then cleaved into two Acetyl-CoA molecules that can go through the Krebs Cycle to be oxidized, resulting in energy that cell can use. Ultimately, the liver is basically sending Acetyl-CoA that it isnt metabolizing to other tissues (by way of Ketone Bodies in the blood) so that those other tissues can utilize the Acetyl-CoA. However, sometimes, the extrahepatic tissues do not oxidize the ketone bodies rapidly enough to keep up with the pace at which they are arriving from the blood. This is a problem described in more detail in the next video in the series. For a suggested viewing order of the videos, information on tutoring, personalized video solutions, and an opportunity to support Moof University financially, visit MoofUniversity.com, and follow Moof University on the different social media platforms. Don't forget to LIKE, COMMENT, and SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Continue reading >>

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  1. heatherny2

    My yorkipoo, Rusty, was just diagnosed today and not given a good prognosis. His glucose level was over 400 and ketones were present in his urine. The vet wanted to send him to a specialist to be watched over the weekend, but I can't afford that. We will administer insulin over the weekend, testing him every few hours, and see how he does. He has already developed the cataracts, but is eating and acting fine, so i just didn't have the heart to euthanize him today without giving him a chance over the weekend. My sons will just be devastated if he doesn't pull through.
    Anyone had any experience with this and if so, what was the outcome? Oh, and maybe some jingles will help.

  2. McVillesMom

    I worked with a number of DKA dogs when I was a tech in an emergency/referral hospital. Most of them were in the CCU, unfortunately, and some of them did survive, but it's usually very touch and go for a while. It sounds as though your guy is in better shape than most of my patients were - a lot of them were flat out, essentially comatose, so the fact that he is still eating and acting fine is a good sign. Hopefully, since you just found out, you will be able to get his glucose regulated and he'll do well - just keep a VERY close eye on him and do NOT hesitate to call or take him somewhere if you think he isn't right - they can crash very, very fast.

  3. heatherny2

    Thank you. Yeah, he is acting as normal as he always was, and eating really well (in fact he really likes the special food they gave us). He is also getting used to his glucose testing (with help from DH and a friend). We are, however, all watching him for any changes, so we can immediately get it addressed.

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For more information on this, visit the link below: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Warning Signs of Diabetes in Dogs 1. Weakness or Fatigue 2. Increased Thirst 3. Increased Urination 4. Increased Hunger 5. Sudden Weight Loss 6. Obesity 7. Thinning or Dull Hair 8. Cloudy Eyes 9. Vomiting http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-w... Nicolas, selected from petMD Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Is your dog consuming lots of water...more than you think is normal? Eating too much? Frequently urinating? He might have diabetes. Sugar diabetes, more specifically known as canine diabetes, is a common disease to dogs. It is a hormonal disorder that affects dogs of ages 5 to 9. Some species like German Shepherd, Poodles, Keeshonden and Golden Retrievers register the highest incidence of this disease. Obese dogs also stand a greater risk of being diabetic. The ratio of female to male infected with the disease is 3:1. This book addresses the most conspicuous symptoms of diabetes in dogs, the main causes, and how to effectively treat it.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Dogs

Overview Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in Dogs Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the most severe form of Diabetes Mellitus in dogs, results in severe changes in blood chemicals including imbalances in small, simple chemicals known as electrolytes. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic condition in which a deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body’s ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases of dogs. For more information on the basics of diabetes, go to Diabetes mellitus in dogs DKA is a life-threatening condition caused by diabetes mellitus resulting from insulin deficiency that leads to excess production of ketoacids by the liver. Subsequent changes in the blood result that includes metabolic acidosis, electrolyte abnormalities producing severe signs of systemic illness. DKA condition can occur in pets with new diabetes or in current diabetics that decompensate. Secondary diseases and/or infections can cause diabetics to decompensate and develop DKA. What to Watch For with Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Signs associated with DKA depend on the individual pet and the length of time they have been ill. Signs may consist of the classic signs Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. heatherny2

    My yorkipoo, Rusty, was just diagnosed today and not given a good prognosis. His glucose level was over 400 and ketones were present in his urine. The vet wanted to send him to a specialist to be watched over the weekend, but I can't afford that. We will administer insulin over the weekend, testing him every few hours, and see how he does. He has already developed the cataracts, but is eating and acting fine, so i just didn't have the heart to euthanize him today without giving him a chance over the weekend. My sons will just be devastated if he doesn't pull through.
    Anyone had any experience with this and if so, what was the outcome? Oh, and maybe some jingles will help.

  2. McVillesMom

    I worked with a number of DKA dogs when I was a tech in an emergency/referral hospital. Most of them were in the CCU, unfortunately, and some of them did survive, but it's usually very touch and go for a while. It sounds as though your guy is in better shape than most of my patients were - a lot of them were flat out, essentially comatose, so the fact that he is still eating and acting fine is a good sign. Hopefully, since you just found out, you will be able to get his glucose regulated and he'll do well - just keep a VERY close eye on him and do NOT hesitate to call or take him somewhere if you think he isn't right - they can crash very, very fast.

  3. heatherny2

    Thank you. Yeah, he is acting as normal as he always was, and eating really well (in fact he really likes the special food they gave us). He is also getting used to his glucose testing (with help from DH and a friend). We are, however, all watching him for any changes, so we can immediately get it addressed.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. Before the availability of insulin in the 1920s, DKA was a uniformly fatal disorder. Even after the discovery of insulin, DKA continued to carry a grave prognosis with a reported mortality rate in humans ranging from 10% to 30%. However, with the expanding knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of DKA and the application of new treatment techniques for the complications of DKA, the mortality rate for this disorder has decreased to less than 5% in experienced human medical centers (Kitabchi et al, 2008). We have experienced a similar decrease in the mortality rate for DKA in our hospital over the past two decades. DKA remains a challenging disorder to treat, in part because of the deleterious impact of DKA on multiple organ systems and the frequent occurrence of concurrent often serious disorders that are responsible for the high mortality rate of DKA. In humans, the incidence of DKA has not decreased, appropriate therapy remains controversial, and patients continue to succumb to this complication of diabetes mellitus. This chapter summarizes current concepts regarding the pathophysiology and management of Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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