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Can You Make Glucose From Protein?

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SUMMARY: not under normal circumstances at least. when your body is in a surplus, it will store the fat as fat, and in some cases the excess carbs. but protein has WAY too many pathways of higher priority (muscle building, oxidation, tissue building, glucose conversion, urea excretion etc) for it to become fat. not saying its impossible, but in the average bodybuilder this will not happen, unless all you eat is just protein (like fucking 500g of protein a day on a protein only diet). so dont let people tell you your excess protein will become fat. no. it might MAKE you fat indirectly (by putting you at a super surplus, causing your body to store the other macros at fat), but the protein in itself won't turn into fat. in fact the best thing u can do to lose weight is to eat more protein (whole food sources). it will not only keep you full longer, but will prevent excessive protein breakdown that comes from dieting and training. copiche bitch? $$$$$$$ MY CONTACTS $$$$$$$ Facebook: Jonathan Migan Facebook Fan Page: lowbudgetleanmuscle Twitter: @Team3Darmy Instagram: Jonathanmigan Play Station Network: Jerubbaal89 YGOPRO: ragnarok34 DuelingNetwork: sucemapin Get a FREE Text message Each Time I Upload a Video (US only): http://motube.us/lowbudgetleanmuscle $$$$$$$ COMPANIES I FUCKS WITH $$$$$$ ~GORILLA WEAR Clothing: high quality alpha shit. give these guys a try. : http://www.facebook.com/gorillawearusa Click Here: http://www.gorillawear.com/choose ~BEASTSUPPS: cool supplements and original training gear from my boy Jack. Click Here: http://www.beastsupps.com ***Discount code 10%: TEAM3D ~PRIME NUTRITION: a shitload of high quality supplements. also a lot of Protein Synthesis type shit. Click Here: http://www.primenutrition.com ***Discount code 10% off: gym240 $$$$$$$ MY CHANNELS $$$$$$$ Wisdom Channel: http://www.youtube.com/team3dwisdom News Channel: http://www.youtube.com/team3dshocking... Math Channel: http://www.youtube.com/team3dmathematics Religion Channel: http://www.youtube.com/team3dletstalkgod $$$$$$$ Matt aka "Lazy Lion"'s Channel$$$$$$ http://www.youtube.com/truthseeker182 $$$$$$$ MUSIC $$$$$$$ Music By TrillLouie: http://www.youtube.com/user/ytlouietunez YouTube, you can Email him at: [email protected] for confirmation that i have permission to use his music. $$$$$$$ DISCLAIMERS $$$$$$$ Copyright: i have the permission to use all the music in the video. Email me if you need proof, or the people whose emails i have provided above. Disclaimer: The advice on my channel and all my videos MUST NOT be substituted under any circumstances for medical advice. It is mainly my opinion based on personal research and experiences. I am not a licensed professional. Contact your physician before starting any nutritional or training program. Im out bitches!!!

Do Fat And Protein Turn Into Glucose?

Sandi Busch received a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, then pursued training in nursing and nutrition. She taught families to plan and prepare special diets, worked as a therapeutic support specialist, and now writes about her favorite topics nutrition, food, families and parenting for hospitals and trade magazines. Glucose keeps you energized.Photo Credit: Ridofranz/iStock/Getty Images When blood glucose gets low, your energy plummets and you may find it hard to concentrate. Your body can temporarily fill the gap by drawing on glucose stored in your liver, but those supplies are limited. When they run out, your body can produce glucose from fats and proteins. Fats are good for backup energy, but your body doesnt like to divert protein into energy due to its other vital functions. The best way to keep your body fueled is to consume the right amount of fats, proteins and carbs. Carbohydrates consist of molecules of sugar, which your body digests into glucose and uses for energy. When youre short on carbs, glucose can be created from fat and protein in a process called gluconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis takes place mostly in your liver, which also has the job of maintaining a steady a Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

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25 Diabetic Diet Food List ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- When it comes to diabetes, your diet should be highly monitored, Apples: An apple a day keeps the doctor away -- purposely the cardiologist. A 2012 study at Ohio State University published in the Journal of Functional Foods found Asparagus: Based on taste alone, asparagus is a favorite food for many. i Avocados: Avocados are known for their heart-healthy monounsaturated fat content. Beans: There may just be something to that old line, "Beans, beans, the magical fruit." Of course, you probably know that beans are high in fiber and a good basis of protein, Blueberries: Blueberries are part of the family of fruits containing flavonoids, known for their many health benefits, Broccoli: This nonstarchy vegetable makes just about every superfood list, and it's easy to see why. For starters, it has more vitamin C per 100 grams than an orange. Carrots: Cooked or raw, carrots are a healthy addition to any meal plan. While cooked carrots have the rich texture of starchy vegetables, 25 Diabetic Diet Food List Cranberries : hey're not just for holiday dinners anymore. There are now good reasons to enjoy this power-packed fruit year-round. Fish : The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends eating fish twice a week. Flaxseed: Sometimes good things come in threes, and that's certainly true of flaxseed: It contains alpha-linolenic acid, which can be converted into omega-3 fatty acids, offering similar benefits of those found in fish. Ref: http://ezinearticles.com/ezinepublish... Garlic: Garlic, the edible bulb from a plant in the lily family, has served as both a medicine and flavoring agent in cookery for thousands of years. Kale: "A 1/2-cup serving of cooked kale has only 18 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. It contains almost all the important nutrients, from vitamin A to zinc Melon: When you're longing something sweet, make tracks to the melon aisle, where you'll find many varieties including watermelon, cantaloupe, muskmelon, honeydew, casaba, crenshaw, Persian, and pepino. Nuts: In a nutshell, nuts are one of the healthiest food choices you can make. According to the Mayo Clinic, most nuts enclose at least one or more of these heart-healthy substances: unsaturated fats, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, vitamin E, plant sterols, and L-arginine, Oatmeal: There's nothing more comforting than a warm bowl of oatmeal in the morning. Plus, it's a more nutritious option than many other starchy breakfast foods, such as sugary cereals, sweet rolls, and bagels, Quinoa: If you're interested in expanding your vegetarian options, you may want to give quinoa a try. Raspberries: These little berries pack a big nutritional punch. A 1-cup portion provides over half of the day's vitamin C, a authoritative antioxidant beneficial for bone and skin health, Red Grapefruit: Sweet, juicy, and delicious, ruby red grapefruit packs more antioxidant power and more health benefits than white grapefruit. In a 30-day test of 57 people with heart disease. Red Onions: Don't hold the onions -- especially red ones. They not only add huge color to salads, burgers, and sandwiches, but they also score higher in antioxidant power compared with their yellow and white cousins. Red Peppers: Red peppers are actually green peppers that have been allowed to ripen on the vine longer. They're encumbered with nutrients, including the antioxidants vitamin C and beta-carotene. Like other red fruits and vegetables, red peppers deliver a healthy dose of lycopene. https://www.facebook.com/a.quddusmakhon Soy: Regardless of the form, soy products have a deserved reputation for providing high-quality protein that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Spinach: Popeye was right -- spinach is good for you. You probably already know that it's loaded with vitamins and minerals. A 1-cup serving of raw spinach or 1/2 cup safe to eat provides over 50 percent of the daily value for folate and vitamin C. https://twitter.com/zocheikeley Tea: The next time you pour yourself a cup of tea, you could be doing your health a favor. Tea contains antioxidant-rich flavonoids called catechins, which appear to reduce the risk of heart disease by helping blood vessels dilate. Tomatoes: Tomatoes are an excellent foundation of vitamins C and A, plus they are rich in lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. 25 Diabetic Diet Food List Yogurt : Yogurt is a sweet treat that is creamy, delicious, and good for you. diabetic diet food list pdf |hypoglycemia food list|diabetes food list |diabetic diet food list fruits |diabetic diet food list avoid|diabetic recipes Subscribe to my channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCthD...

How Food Works

You have probably heard of "carbohydrates" and "complex carbohydrates." Carbohydrates provide your body with its basic fuel. Your body thinks about carbohydrates like a car engine thinks about gasoline. The simplest carbohydrate is glucose. Glucose, also called "blood sugar" and "dextrose," flows in the bloodstream so that it is available to every cell in your body. Your cells absorb glucose and convert it into energy to drive the cell. Specifically, a set of chemical reactions on glucose creates ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and a phosphate bond in ATP powers most of the machinery in any human cell. If you drink a solution of water and glucose, the glucose passes directly from your digestive system into the bloodstream. The word "carbohydrate" comes from the fact that glucose is made up of carbon and water. The chemical formula for glucose is: You can see that glucose is made of six carbon atoms (carbo...) and the elements of six water molecules (...hydrate). Glucose is a simple sugar, meaning that to our tongues it tastes sweet. There are other simple sugars that you have probably heard of. Fructose is the main sugar in fruits. Fructose has the same chemical formula as glucose (C Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

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In this video I discuss the what are carbohydrates and the types of carbohydrates. The pros and cons to each type, and the best carbs to eat. Transcript Types of carbs So, what are the different types of carbohydrates? The answer to this question depends on who you ask. Some common classifications would be healthy and unhealthy, good and bad, slow and fast. In this video I am going to classify them as simple, complex and fibrous. Before we get into those classifications, we need to look at molecules. I know, fun stuff, but it will help you understand better. A monosaccharide is a single molecule, such as fructose, which is found in fruit. A disaccharide consists of 2 monosaccharide molecules, such as sucrose or table sugar. And a polysaccharide consists of many monosaccharide molecules, such as in whole grain pasta. Now that we have that out of the way, lets look at simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made up of mono and disaccharides, 1 or 2 molecules. Some foods include, fruits, milk, and foods with high amounts of added sugars. Typically simple carbohydrates are easily absorbed into the bloodstream because of their simple molecular structure. However, when you obtain simple carbohydrates from whole foods, they are usually combined with vitamins, minerals and fiber, which slows down the digestive process. Now, lets look at complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are composed of polysaccharides, so, because of their more complex molecular structure, they can take longer for the body to break down and digest, like whole grains and vegetables. However, some complex carbohydrate foods have been processed, which strips them of some of their natural, high fiber content as well as vitamins and minerals, so they are digested faster and more easily. So, with both simple and complex carbohydrates I have mentioned fast and slow digestion. Why is that important? 3 reasons, #1 is it is going to make you feel fuller longer, rapid digestion means hunger returns quicker which leads to more consumption. #2, typically slower digested foods cause lower blood level spikes, and #3, slower, longer digestion means the body is using more energy over a longer period of time to break down the food, which is an increase or boost in metabolism. Next up is fiber. Fiber is parts of plants that cant be digested. I have a separate video that looks deeper into fiber that I will link in the little I in the upper right-hand corner of your screen. Bottom line. So, the question is what type of carbohydrates should you eat. That is actually very easy to answer. All 3 types. Don’t focus on the types, instead, focus on Carbohydrates that have been minimally processed, like whole grain pasta, and whole wheat bread, also Fruits and vegetables that contain fiber, vitamins and minerals. And of course anything from dairy queen. Ah, just joking with ya folks. Seriously though, minimize the consumption of the processed foods, if you can eliminated them great, if not, its about moderation. Its ok to eat the foods you love, you just have to do it in moderation. Other sources... http://www.builtlean.com/2012/05/17/c... http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healt... http://www.livestrong.com/article/133...

Can Your Body Produce Carbohydrates From Protein Intake?

Your body relies on three classes of nutrients to meet its energetic needs: carbohydrates, protein and fats. It ultimately breaks down all digestible carbs into glucose, one of the simplest carbohydrates and the body's primary fuel. Some tissues, such as the brain, red blood cells, kidneys, cornea, testes and muscles, need a steady supply of glucose to function optimally. When necessary, your body makes glucose from nutrients other than carbohydrates, namely, proteins and fats. The process involved is called gluconeogenesis. Proteins and carbohydrates yield 4 calories per gram. With a yield of 9 calories per gram, fats provide the most energy by weight, but they digest more slowly than proteins and carbs do. The body prefers carbohydrates, as they are the quickest source of energy. When carbohydrates become unavailable, your body turns first to protein as an alternate fuel source, and second to fats. Carbohydrate and Protein Usage When you eat too many carbs or too much protein, your body stores some of the excess as fat. Excess carbs also end up in your liver and muscles in the form of glycogen. Between meals or during an overnight fast, your body taps into glycogen stores to get Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

  4. -> Continue reading
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