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Can You Go Into Ketosis If You Drink Alcohol?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

There’s something called a ketogenic diet that a lot more people are relying on as a way to lose weight, particularly recently. So what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis, and what is the relationship between alcohol and the ketosis diet and weight loss? Below are some of the things to know about the ketogenic diet and alcohol and ketosis. Before looking at the specifics of alcohol and ketosis, what is ketosis in general? Ketosis is a term that refers to a metabolic process that your body regularly goes through. When you don’t have the glucose you need to fuel your body with energy, you’ll instead go into a mode where you’re burning stored fats. When this happens, ketones, which are a build-up of acids, are in the body. The belief with the ketogenic diet is that you can encourage your body to go into that state of ketosis or fat-burning by following a certain diet, which is low-carb. You’re basically forcing your body to eliminate fat because that’s what it’s using for energy instead of carbs. The state of ketosis frequently occurs in people with diabetes, and while it’s a normal process, some extremes are possible. If you have extreme ketosis, you’re more likely to have type 1 diabetes, as an example. If your ketone levels rise too much, it can cause your acid level in your blood to similarly rise, which can cause a condition called ketoacidosis. This can be deadly. Your body typically primarily uses glucose as energy, such as from sugary or starchy foods, but if there’s not enough of this glucose your body will then go to breaking down your stores of fat. The ketogenic diet is also called a low-carb diet, or a keto diet. It’s based on a concept of eating primarily fats, and a reduced amount of carbohydrates. While it’s relatively popular, t Continue reading >>

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drinking alcohol has become a big part of modern culture, as has eating carbs. But those things deserve more attention when on keto. How do you drink alcohol on the ketogenic diet? Keto and Alcohol Let’s look into the properties of alcohol. Alcohol is commonly thought of as the 4th macronutrient because it does have calories in it but gives no real energy to the body. The body has no mechanism to store alcohol endogenously because it’s still toxic. Whenever you consume alcohol, the liver will prioritize getting rid of it over everything else. Meaning, while metabolizing alcohol, the body isn’t metabolizing anything else. You’re not burning fat or producing ketones either. Do you get kicked out of ketosis when drinking alcohol? Not entirely, but it can still have some effects on your metabolism, weight loss and overall health. Alcohol While Keto But not all alcohol is created nor metabolized equally. Alcoholic beverages consist of many ingredients. Ethanol, which is the alcohol molecule, is one of them. Additionally, nearly all drinks contain some sort of a sugar compound, which determines the carb content and metabolic effects. Alcohol to avoid on keto Beer is made of barley, hops, yeast, and water. Rich in carbs. Ciders and long drinks are like alcoholic sodas. Wine has grape juice, some sweeter than others. More carbs. Cocktails and sugary mixers have soda, syrups, and juices. Flavored spirits have added sugar and more carbs. In general, the sweeter something tastes, the more carbs it has. You won’t get kicked out of ketosis by drinking a glass of wine or even two. But you will definitely do so with beer, cider, and cocktails. Those margaritas aren’t good for ketones or your waistline. Don’t eat food while drinking alcohol. Because it’s still a toxin, Continue reading >>

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol: What to drink; When to drink, How to drink, And how it affects ketosis. You can drink alcohol in moderation on a Ketogenic Diet as long as you don't have a medical condition that would prohibit you from doing so. Alcoholic drinks DO have calories, and they come from alcohol (at 7 kcals per gram) and from carbs (at 4 kcals per gram). Your body does not have the ability to store the calories from alcohol itself, but it will store the energy from the food ingested along with it. Your body WILL metabolize alcohol before any other source of energy. So while you are metabolizing calories from alcohol, you are NOT metabolizing those from fat. To stay on track with your dietary goals, find out the caloric content of your drink, divide it by 9, then deduct this from your allowed fat grams of the day. Anecdotally, ketosis may lower your alcohol tolerance (1) so you could get drunk faster, there are some theories about the whys (2) but nothing conclusive. Alcohol also dehydrates you, so drink a glass of water along with each alcoholic beverage you consume. Not all alcohol is the same: alcohol is the product of sugar fermented by yeast. Depending on the type of sugar used, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages with different alcohol and carb content. Straight Liquors are basically zero carb, so mix any of them with water, club soda, or diet sodas to keep them carb free. Pro-Tip: if you use Tonic, make sure it is a sugar free version so it does not contain sugar and carbs! Other liquors such as Amaretto, Jägermeister, Grand Marnier, Curacao, Sweet Vermouth, Limoncello, etc. (basically anything with a hint of sweet) usually contain sugars, so you better avoid them entirely. Although wine is made from grapes and logic dictates it should be hig Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, you train your body to begin using fats for energy rather than carbohydrates. This is also known as a state of ketosis which is indicated by the production of a by-product called ketones. What happens to ketone levels when you introduce alcohol into the mix? Interestingly enough, our bodies treat alcohol like any carbohydrate, in that it is sent to the front of the line to be used as energy. While your body burns calories from the alcohol you consumed, ketosis will be "paused." You won't get kicked out and have to reinitiate it, but ketone production will momentarily cease while your body burns the alcohol. Effects of Drinking and Caution One of the best features of ketogenic dieting is that you can easily drink alcohol in moderation without setting your diet goals back. There are a few things you should remember when drinking alcohol while in ketosis: Ketogenic dieters experience notoriously bad hangovers. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water in between drinks. While drinking liquor won't ruin your diet, all things in moderation. Excess carbohydrates and calories will still slow down your weight loss, so make sure you keep drinking to a minimum when possible. Don't forget to consider mixers when calculating your carb counts. Use diet sodas and artificially sweetened juices instead of their full-carbohydrate counterparts. Don't let alcohol affect your willpower! The intoxicating effects may tempt you to stray from your diet, but don't eat those french fries! Try to have some low carb snacks lined up that you can resort to when you get hungry. Below are a few of the most popular types of alcohol, along with their calorie and carbohydrate counts. Have fun and be safe! Calories and Carbohydrates in Liquor (1 oz.) Alcohol Name Calories (kcal) Carbo Continue reading >>

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

088.8KSHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS and Keto Max from Pruvit provide exogenous ketones. Maximize your ketone levels with a ketogenic diet approved food list. What is Ketosis? Explore the health benefits of ketosis for accelerated fat loss, disease prevention, better brain function, appetite control, performance, and more. Ketosis can often be a misunderstood subject. Some think it is part of a starvation diet or a alarming sign that something has gone wrong in your metabolism. But this is simply not the truth! You see, ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. Have you ever heard someone say that fats are “evil”? This has become the standard way of thinking in today’s society, which has led to our primary energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Most people eat a diet high in carbohydrates or glucose. When sugar is your body’s primary energy source, that sugar needs to be processed first in the cell soup before it can be passed into the energy factory of the cell- the mitochondrion. Energy sources from fat don’t require this processing; it goes directly into the mitochondria for energetic uses. That is, it is more complicated to create energy out of sugar than out of fat. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. “Carbohydrates are not required to obtain energy. Fat supplies more energy than a comparable amount of carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate diets tend to make your system of producing energy more efficient. Furthermore, many organs prefer Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

When on a ketogenic diet or other low carb diets there are many people asking if it is possible to combine ketosis and Alcohol. The simple answer is yes, you can stay in ketosis even though you drink alcohol but you need to be careful what kind of alcohol you drink. You can also not drink alcohol on a regular basis since it will impact your weight loss even though it does not take you out of ketosis. The main reason that alcohol will impact your ketosis is that the body is not able to store the alcohol that you consume. Instead it will start to metabolize the calories in the alcohol first before the body uses any other energy sources. This means that you will not use fat as your main energy source until the alcohol in the body has been used up. Still does not impact ketosis, but your weight loss results. Also when drinking alcohol on ketosis there are some kinds of alcohol that are better than others. Your first choice should be vodka, whiskey or other types of strong alcohol. They contain no or very little carbohydrates. If you do not like to drink strong alcohol then some dry wine is also quite okay. It contains some more carbohydrates but still okay now and then. Beer and other kinds of alcohol you should stay away from if you want to focus on your diet. To help you to know how many calories there are in different types of alcohol you can use this keto alcohol cheat sheet from dietketo.com Red Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Merlot: 3.7g carbohydrates and 120 calories Pinot Noir: 3.4g carbohydrates and 121 calories Cabernet: 3.8g carbohydrates and 120 calories White Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Chardonnay: 3.7g carbohydrates and 118 calories Riesling: 5.5g carbohydrates and 118 calories Sparkling whites: 1.5g carbohydrates and 96 calories Beer Based on 12oz or 3.5dL. Mi Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet! Alcohol gets a bad rep, and is certainly one of the most abused substances in the world. It can become a serious problem when it interferes with your personal/social life and well-being. To enjoy it we need to exercise moderation and self-control. If you like having a couple of beers, shots or glasses of wine to relax or have a good time on weekends, you’re in good shape! But throw a low carb diet into the mix, and you may find yourself struggling with the quantity of alcohol you’re drinking. People on a keto or low carb diet notice their tolerances significantly drop. And when you realize your favorite drink contains more than 30 grams of carbs in a small serving, you may consider giving alcohol up. Before you give it up, use our Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide to help navigate your way through your local bar and become a keto connoisseur. How and Why Alcohol Affects Us “…alcohol molecules slow down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking” Alcohol is actually the fourth macronutrient, providing our body with 7 calories per gram. If you aren’t familiar with macronutrients, you can read more about macronutrients here. Since alcohol is not needed for survival and is considered toxic to humans, it’s ignored under this umbrella of essential macronutrients. When we ingest alcohol (in the form of ethanol), our body begins to work to metabolize it, or destroy/break it down to get energy. Since alcohol is toxic to our bodies, we begin to metabolize it as soon as possible. The tipsy feeling we get is the alcohol being metabolized. Since alcohol molecules are water and fat soluble, they’re able to pass through and be delivered to pretty much all parts of our body, most importantly, our brain and liver. About 98% of th Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

As the festive party season fast approaches, a common question raised by my clients is ‘Am I able to have an alcoholic drink whilst on the ketogenic diet?’ So I thought I’d put together all of my thoughts around ketosis and alcohol and share it with the rest of my followers. For starters, let take a look at what happens to our body when we consume alcohol. When we drink alcohol, it gets absorbed very quickly into our bloodstream via our stomach and small intestine. Alcohol is toxic and as a result, the body tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible by breaking it down into non toxic substances, carbon dioxide and water. This detoxification process takes place in the liver. The liver is unable to process all of the alcohol in the bloodstream at once, so the body has other ways of getting rid of it, via urine, sweat and even the lungs. Ketosis and alcohol: the effect on weight loss Alcohol is best avoided on a keto diet because it impacts insulin levels and the whole point of eating a ketogenic diet is to control insulin by lowering blood sugar levels enough to allow use fat for fuel (preferably your own body fat if you’re trying to lean down). Insulin is the hormone that prevents this from happening and essentially locks body fat in, preventing it from being an accessible fuel source. When alcohol is consumed, there’s typically an initial rise in blood sugars. The amount to which is rises depends on how much you’ve drank. This is because the body is trying to rid itself of the toxic alcohol, rather than controlling its blood sugar levels. As the body detoxifies, insulin then spikes to allow blood sugar levels to be controlled. Ketone levels also drop. This locks the body fat in and halts the fat burning process! This is exactly the opposite of what we wan Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss – Calories And Carbs In Drinks

How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss – Calories And Carbs In Drinks

In the never-never land of diet hype, something new is on the scene. Alcoholic beverages labeled for carbohydrate and calorie content and many of them are boasting of low carb beer, low carb wine and “no carbs” liquor. You may not have noticed the labels yet, but they are either in the marketplace already or coming very soon. The labeling of beer, wine and the hard stuff for calorie content is not a bad idea and it is useful to know the caloric content of anything you’re about to consume. But what about carbs? Wine producers, on another tack, have lobbied for permission to use a “heart-healthy” label, but the agency with jurisdiction over such matters (the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, part of the Treasury Department, which has long regulated the “sinful” commodities, as well as firearms) has been cool to the idea, and has required so many disclaimers that a bottle of wine would need to come with a booklet tied around its neck. However, though the wine industry can’t simply label wine as having heart benefits, the low-carb and no-carb claims on alcoholic beverages are legal—so long as the labels don’t actually say that they help you lose weight. But, in fact, the terms are now irrevocably linked in most people’s minds (especially young people’s minds) to “weight loss,” “Atkins diet,” or even “better for you.” “Cut carbs, lose weight,” many people now think. “Low-carb” has somehow come to mean “healthy.” Nothing could be further from the truth when it comes to alcohol—and no subject could be more confused and confusing than the effect of alcoholic beverages on weight. Top 5 Low Calorie Cocktails To Drink On New Years Eve #1. LIGHT BEER (12 ounce bottle): Calories: 110 Carbs: 4.5 grams Fat: 0 grams Protein: 0 g Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Your Brain

Alcohol And Your Brain

A recent study, published in the British Medical Journal, brings into question existing recommendations in the US and UK, many of which are now being revised, for moderate alcohol consumption. Previously, we believed there was a bell curve-like relationship between consumption and brain heath, with high risk existing for those who abstain and those who drink heavily, and a slight reduction in risk for those who drink a modest amount. But this new study, which measured the size of the hippocampus in drinkers, brings new evidence to light that contradicts this commonly held belief. For those of you looking to enjoy alcohol healthfully, I’d recommend Dry Farm Wines. Their wines are natural, organic and lower in alcohol and sugar – giving you the many benefits of red wine without the risks of excessive alcohol and sugar consumption. As one of my readers, you’re eligible to receive an additional bottle for just 1 cent with your first order when you purchase with this link. Read Next Continue reading >>

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Ok, so I’m finally posting the Egg Fast Diet menu plan! For those of you who are just catching up, I did a 5 day egg fast diet to break through a stall and get back on track with my weight loss on a keto/lchf diet. My final results were that I lost 7.4 lbs during the five days (and felt great!), then gained back .5 over the 2 days I was off the diet (typical.) I plan to do another three days starting Monday to see if I’ll lose again or if it was a one time thing. I’ll continue to post my results daily on the IBIH Facebook page and Instagram. If you’re interested in trying the Egg Fast Diet and want more details about what it is, how it works, etc., you can check out my post about it here. Basically on an egg fast you are consuming eggs, butter (or other pure and healthy fat like olive oil or coconut oil), and cheese, with a few exceptions for low carb condiments like hot sauce, mustard, etc. The egg fast ratio is to eat 1 Tbsp fat for each egg consumed and up to 1 oz cheese for each egg consumed. (Scroll down to go directly to the plan.) Before I go any further I should make it clear that I am not a doctor, nurse, or even a nutritionist. This is just me telling you what I’ve done, what the results were, and what my opinions are regarding the egg fast diet and why it works for many people. It may or not be for you – and only you can make that decision. If you have previously existing health conditions, it’s probably wise to consult with your doctor before undertaking an extremely low carb plan like this one. If you start and are really feeling poorly – don’t ignore any danger signs or red flags – stop immediately. It’s not worth risking your life over – if your body doesn’t respond well to this, I’m sure there are other things that will work f Continue reading >>

More Ideal Protein Faqs

More Ideal Protein Faqs

Learn more about the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Protocol by visiting our dedicated website Why do we use Sea Salt on Ideal Protein Diet? Sea salt gives you the appropriate mix of trace minerals in its unrefined form, promotes a healthy pH, electrolyte balance and adrenal health. Refined sea salt provides too much sodium and is not a healthy option. How do I get started with Ideal Protein Weight Loss Protocol? There are several ways to start. You can come to a FREE workshop which is held several times a month. Check out our home page for the next Ideal Protein Free Workshop. If you already know about Ideal Protein and you are ready to get started call Coach Joyce to book your initial consultation 617-666-1122 or email [email protected] Do you have hours in the evenings and weekends? Yes and yes! My initial consultations and follow-up sessions are by appointment in Nashua and Pepperell, during the week, on weekends and evenings. We will find a time that works for you! Do you charge for shipping Ideal Protein foods? Yes, shipping is charged at my cost. If you want to keep your shipping costs down select dry goods over the premade drinks when shipping. Where can I find information about the nutritional values of Ideal Protein foods? Here are a few websites that are not affiliated with Ideal Protein where you fill find people chatting about Ideal Protein: www.3fatchicks.com www.myfitnesspal.com www.fatsecret.com www.facebook.com Can I have sugar-free gum on Ideal Protein weight loss protocol? Sugar-free gum contains sugar alcohols and carbohydrates. Sugar-free gum is not free and has no nutritional value. Always consider your food choices with respect to the “cost-benefit”. Do you want to spend your “carbohydrate allowance” on something that has no nutritional Continue reading >>

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