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Can You Go Into Ketosis If You Drink Alcohol?

Can I Drink Alcohol On Keto?

Can I Drink Alcohol On Keto?

Yes. Next question? Nah, I won't be that flippant. It's a good question that comes up a lot. I can tell you that I enjoy wine and spirits and on a regular basis. It hasn't kicked me out of ketosis and doesn't seem to have impacted my weight loss. One can't prove a negative, of course, so I don't know how much I would have lost if I had abstained, but I've been pleased with the pace at which I've lost. And a predictable disclaimer here: I share my experiences and practices that have worked for me. Your experience may be different. Feel free to join in the conversation if you care to share. Now, it's important to note that many cocktails are made with mixers, fruit juices, simple syrup (which is equal parts sugar and water) or other ingredients which have carbohydrates. Those need to be avoided. My go to drinks are martinis - a bit dirty with bleu cheese olives. I also like a Manhattan. Or just straight liquor is fine. Wine, too. I've been challenged on that last one before. Not by anyone knowledgeable about eating LCHF or ketogenic. As a matter of fact, she was literally shaking a bowl of pretzels and Chex mix under my nose, trying to tempt me. Snarky, eh? *shrug* It happens. I thanked her then advised I don't eat carbs. "Well you certainly do. That wine in your glass is loaded with carbs"...."Actually not", says I. "Casey, wine comes from grapes. Grapes are fruit and that's sugar." (Again with the snark. "Really?" i wanted to respond. "I thought wine was made from bacon fat". But I resisted.) I explained that there are special rules for alcohol. The fermentation process eats the sugars present in the grapes - or grains or whatever is being fermented. Sugar alcohols are left. They don't create an insulin response, unlike the original sugars. Keep in mind, though, that th Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Many people believe that adherence to a ketogenic diet means avoiding alcohol altogether. Ketogenic.com does not condone the consumption of alcohol and while it may be true that strict ketogenic dieting may entail refraining from alcohol, the everyday ketogenic connoisseur not following the diet for therapeutic reasons may choose to occasionally enjoy low carb drinks. It is interesting to point out that alcohol itself can actually be ketogenic! In short, ethanol (alcohol) is broken down in the liver to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), free acetate, or broken down through various condensation reactions. As we know, acetyl-CoA can either be utilized in the Krebs Cycle, used for ketogenesis, or to produce ketone bodies, acetoacetate (AcAc), or in peripheral blood increases about 20 times the normal level when ethanol is present; n (1)! Along with the rise of acetate, we also see a considerable increase in AcAc and BHB (2). While it is true that alcohol consumption could result in ketogenesis, Ketogenic.com certainly does not condone this method of inducing ketosis for obvious reasons. I know what you’re thinking… you didn’t click on this article to read about the biochemistry of alcohol metabolism – and if you did – check back soon for a much more detailed article on this topic and the science behind alcohol! Odds are you came here to learn how to have low carb drinks while remaining in ketosis. The main thing to remember when drinking is alcohol does contain calories – approximately 7 calories per gram. More importantly to the ketogenic dieter, most alcohols contain a significant amount of carbohydrates, which can not only blunt fat metabolism but also prevent ketogenesis from occurring (3,4,5). It goes without saying that it is critical to always drink respons Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

For years, I’ve read countless dieting books that prohibited me from drinking alcohol. Actually, it’s probably the first thing that many “diet gurus” say to cut out of your diet and for (somewhat) good reason. Alcohol gets a bad reputation because it’s basically empty calories. In an ideal world, sure. I’ll give up alcohol to lose weight. But let’s get serious. I’m 23 years old and I very much enjoy a tasty alcoholic beverage (or 5) and a wild night out on the town with my friends. The beauty of a ketogenic, low carb diet is that you can still enjoy yourself from time-to-time with alcohol and still lose weight! However, there are some guidelines as to what alcohols you can enjoy and those you should avoid. Liquor On average, one shot is the equivalent to about 1.5oz and for these spirits have a nutritional value of 0 carbs and roughly 64 calories. Of course, this will vary depending on how much is actually in your beverage (order a double? Double the nutritional stats). Approved spirits on a keto, low carb diet include: Vodka (Three Olives, Absolut, Grey Goose, etc.) Rum (Captain Morgan, etc) Gin (Tanqueray, Beefeater, etc) Tequila Whiskey (Jack Daniel’s, etc.) Scotch Brandy Cognac (Hennessy, etc.) Please note that these are for the original, unflavored versions. For flavored spirits (including flavored vodkas and some dark/coconut rums), always check up on nutritional information before consuming as they often contain carbohydrates. My spirit of choice is generally a nice gin (with soda water& lime) or cognac (with diet cola). I’ve been known to drink a fair share of Hennessy. Chasers & Mixers For mixing or chasing, you have many no sugar, no calorie options Diet sodas (Coke Zero, Diet Coke, Diet Ginger Ale) Soda water Diet tonic water Seltzer water Continue reading >>

Choose Your Booze: A Guide To Healthy Drinking

Choose Your Booze: A Guide To Healthy Drinking

198 Comments It’s the question every Primal adherent faces: how does alcohol fit into a low carb lifestyle? Maybe you’re out with friends, bravely resisting the assorted chips and fried concoctions in the center of the table. You don’t mind waiting patiently for the steak and salad you conscientiously selected, but must you be relegated to the likes of club soda and tap water? What would happen exactly if you ordered, well, a “drink-drink”? A nice glass of red wine perhaps? Hmmm…maybe that’s too much to ask at a place where onion blooms are a specialty…. A mixed drink? You begin reminiscing about those great sidecars your best friendused to make. Maybe a shot? That’s simple enough, isn’t it? How about those memories? Well, maybe we’ll fast forward through those recollections. Beer? Beer belly. What about a light beer? They’re low in carbs, right? Whatever the case, you presume there’s no Guinness in your future tonight. Or? Sigh. Now you really need something. What’s a Primal type to do when it comes to a simple social drink? Indeed, there are some legitimate scientific reasons to enjoy alcohol in moderation. Alcohol as a blood thinner enhances vascular health, and the phenolic content (potent antioxidants) can pack a healthy punch. Research has compared alcohol abstention with moderate and “heavy” drinking. Moderate alcohol consumption appears (PDF) to lower the incidence of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, total and ischaemic stroke, as well as result in an overall reduction in mortality. And it seems older folks have the most to gain. Not only do they appear to benefit the most from a vascular health standpoint, research has linked moderate drinking in those over 65 with superior cognitive and memory function. It has also been Continue reading >>

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Ok, so I’m finally posting the Egg Fast Diet menu plan! For those of you who are just catching up, I did a 5 day egg fast diet to break through a stall and get back on track with my weight loss on a keto/lchf diet. My final results were that I lost 7.4 lbs during the five days (and felt great!), then gained back .5 over the 2 days I was off the diet (typical.) I plan to do another three days starting Monday to see if I’ll lose again or if it was a one time thing. I’ll continue to post my results daily on the IBIH Facebook page and Instagram. If you’re interested in trying the Egg Fast Diet and want more details about what it is, how it works, etc., you can check out my post about it here. Basically on an egg fast you are consuming eggs, butter (or other pure and healthy fat like olive oil or coconut oil), and cheese, with a few exceptions for low carb condiments like hot sauce, mustard, etc. The egg fast ratio is to eat 1 Tbsp fat for each egg consumed and up to 1 oz cheese for each egg consumed. (Scroll down to go directly to the plan.) Before I go any further I should make it clear that I am not a doctor, nurse, or even a nutritionist. This is just me telling you what I’ve done, what the results were, and what my opinions are regarding the egg fast diet and why it works for many people. It may or not be for you – and only you can make that decision. If you have previously existing health conditions, it’s probably wise to consult with your doctor before undertaking an extremely low carb plan like this one. If you start and are really feeling poorly – don’t ignore any danger signs or red flags – stop immediately. It’s not worth risking your life over – if your body doesn’t respond well to this, I’m sure there are other things that will work f Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Do keto diets and alcohol mix? Are there even keto alcoholic drinks? Alcohol is one of the hardest things to avoid throughout your adult life. As soon as you hit a legal drinking age, you’ll find that many of your social outings tend to revolve around drinking and having a good time. Whether you’re hitting up a club, the local pub, or gathering at a friend’s place for an intimate night in, it can be pretty difficult to avoid depending on your social situations. Lucky for me (or unlucky…), I wasn’t quite the social butterfly so I was able to steer away from alcohol for most of my diet. On the rare occasions that I did go out, I tried to limit my alcohol intake or make conscious choices to minimize negative impact on my results. How Does Alcohol Affect Keto Diets? Can alcohol knock me out of ketosis? Alcohol will not necessarily knock one out of ketosis, but it may result in stalling weight loss. While alcohol is made from fermenting starches and sugars, which are technically carbs, they are stripped of nutritional value during this process. You can treat alcohol almost as if it were a fourth macro nutrient (along with carbs, protein and fat). While the basic process of a keto diet is that you restrict your body’s carbohydrate intake so that it resorts to using fats as the main energy source. However, since alcohol is considered a toxin to your body, it is metabolized within your first before carbs and fats, which can result in stalling. Your body will need to burn through and remove the alcohol from the system before it can continue burning fat as fuel. It can also potentially cause weight loss stalls since 1g of alcohol has 7 calories which can add up quickly with all those shots. If you’re really interested in seeing the effects on your body, or if you’ Continue reading >>

The Practical Guide To Low-carb Alcohol

The Practical Guide To Low-carb Alcohol

Can You Drink Alcohol On A Low-carb Or Ketogenic Diet? The answer is YES, but what you choose to drink will depend on your weightloss goals. We all know the social benefits, enjoyment, and relaxation that go along with drinking, and it’s tough to give up something if you enjoy it. However, consuming alcohol while on a ketogenic diet can be challenging. Avoiding carbs in alcohol may seem impossible, and because of this, many people choose to not drink at all. But with a bit of know-how, it’s likely that you can enjoy alcoholic drinks and still maintain your low-carb diet! In general, it’s a good idea to be very cautious with alcohol while on a ketogenic diet. Read on to find out if alcohol will fit into your low-carb lifestyle. First, Know Your Goals Alcohol consumption will look a little different depending on your individual goals for low-carb dieting, so it’s important to know where you stand. If you do want to drink alcohol while on a ketogenic diet, there are two main factors that you should consider: are you trying to lose weight, or are you maintaining your weight? This will dictate which drinks you should choose. Are You Trying to Lose Weight? When trying to lose weight through a low-carb diet, you’ll need to avoid most types of alcohol. There are some alcoholic drinks that contain very few carbs, such as liquor but common drinks such as beer and wine will interfere with your diet. The body treats alcohol primarily as a source of fuel. When you consume alcohol, you are no longer using fat as a fuel. While the alcohol is in your system, instead of burning away excess fat, your body will prioritize processing the alcohol. Your liver views alcohol as a toxin and wants to move it through your system. While you’re burning off the alcohol, the time spent in Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet! Alcohol gets a bad rep, and is certainly one of the most abused substances in the world. It can become a serious problem when it interferes with your personal/social life and well-being. To enjoy it we need to exercise moderation and self-control. If you like having a couple of beers, shots or glasses of wine to relax or have a good time on weekends, you’re in good shape! But throw a low carb diet into the mix, and you may find yourself struggling with the quantity of alcohol you’re drinking. People on a keto or low carb diet notice their tolerances significantly drop. And when you realize your favorite drink contains more than 30 grams of carbs in a small serving, you may consider giving alcohol up. Before you give it up, use our Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide to help navigate your way through your local bar and become a keto connoisseur. How and Why Alcohol Affects Us “…alcohol molecules slow down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking” Alcohol is actually the fourth macronutrient, providing our body with 7 calories per gram. If you aren’t familiar with macronutrients, you can read more about macronutrients here. Since alcohol is not needed for survival and is considered toxic to humans, it’s ignored under this umbrella of essential macronutrients. When we ingest alcohol (in the form of ethanol), our body begins to work to metabolize it, or destroy/break it down to get energy. Since alcohol is toxic to our bodies, we begin to metabolize it as soon as possible. The tipsy feeling we get is the alcohol being metabolized. Since alcohol molecules are water and fat soluble, they’re able to pass through and be delivered to pretty much all parts of our body, most importantly, our brain and liver. About 98% of th Continue reading >>

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

I get it. You want to adopt a healthy lifestyle but you don’t know if drinking alcohol on the ketogenic diet is a smart idea. Obviously alcohol is bad for you. We all know this. And it’s obviously one of the most abused yet socially acceptable substances out there. No one wants to be the guy/gal who doesn’t go out on a friday night just because you’re on a diet. With that being said, it’s important to take necessary precautions especially on a low carb high fat ketogenic diet. It’s completely possible to stay in ketosis and still enjoy a couple drinks here and there. Can I Still Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet? Yes but you have to be careful. If you want to successfully stay in ketosis, you have to choose your drinks wisely. Drinking low carb or zero carb drinks will ensure that after your body utilizes the alcohol as a source of fuel, that you are back into ketosis immediately after. When we consume alcohol, our body starts working to metabolize it in order to use it as energy. When we start to feel “drunk” this is due to our body’s metabolizing the alcohol. Drinking alcohol disrupts our fat burning processes because it prioritizes the processing of alcohol before anything else since it is toxic to our body’s. This is why some people experience the stalling of weight-loss when they drink alcohol. What Will Happen To My Alcohol Tolerance On The Ketogenic Diet? Since you are restricting any form of glycogen (through carbs) on the ketogenic diet, your liver glycogen storages are already depleted which means you are running off of fats instead of glucose, thus, burning fat more effectively. Someone on a high carb diet has plenty of glycogen stored in their body. This gives your body a buffer before metabolizing alcohol. So what does this all mean ex Continue reading >>

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol: What to drink; When to drink, How to drink, And how it affects ketosis. You can drink alcohol in moderation on a Ketogenic Diet as long as you don't have a medical condition that would prohibit you from doing so. Alcoholic drinks DO have calories, and they come from alcohol (at 7 kcals per gram) and from carbs (at 4 kcals per gram). Your body does not have the ability to store the calories from alcohol itself, but it will store the energy from the food ingested along with it. Your body WILL metabolize alcohol before any other source of energy. So while you are metabolizing calories from alcohol, you are NOT metabolizing those from fat. To stay on track with your dietary goals, find out the caloric content of your drink, divide it by 9, then deduct this from your allowed fat grams of the day. Anecdotally, ketosis may lower your alcohol tolerance (1) so you could get drunk faster, there are some theories about the whys (2) but nothing conclusive. Alcohol also dehydrates you, so drink a glass of water along with each alcoholic beverage you consume. Not all alcohol is the same: alcohol is the product of sugar fermented by yeast. Depending on the type of sugar used, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages with different alcohol and carb content. Straight Liquors are basically zero carb, so mix any of them with water, club soda, or diet sodas to keep them carb free. Pro-Tip: if you use Tonic, make sure it is a sugar free version so it does not contain sugar and carbs! Other liquors such as Amaretto, Jägermeister, Grand Marnier, Curacao, Sweet Vermouth, Limoncello, etc. (basically anything with a hint of sweet) usually contain sugars, so you better avoid them entirely. Although wine is made from grapes and logic dictates it should be hig Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

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