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Can You Go Into Ketosis If You Drink Alcohol?

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, you train your body to begin using fats for energy rather than carbohydrates. This is also known as a state of ketosis which is indicated by the production of a by-product called ketones. What happens to ketone levels when you introduce alcohol into the mix? Interestingly enough, our bodies treat alcohol like any carbohydrate, in that it is sent to the front of the line to be used as energy. While your body burns calories from the alcohol you consumed, ketosis will be "paused." You won't get kicked out and have to reinitiate it, but ketone production will momentarily cease while your body burns the alcohol. Effects of Drinking and Caution One of the best features of ketogenic dieting is that you can easily drink alcohol in moderation without setting your diet goals back. There are a few things you should remember when drinking alcohol while in ketosis: Ketogenic dieters experience notoriously bad hangovers. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water in between drinks. While drinking liquor won't ruin your diet, all things in moderation. Excess carbohydrates and calories will still slow down your weight loss, so make sure you keep drinking to a minimum when possible. Don't forget to consider mixers when calculating your carb counts. Use diet sodas and artificially sweetened juices instead of their full-carbohydrate counterparts. Don't let alcohol affect your willpower! The intoxicating effects may tempt you to stray from your diet, but don't eat those french fries! Try to have some low carb snacks lined up that you can resort to when you get hungry. Below are a few of the most popular types of alcohol, along with their calorie and carbohydrate counts. Have fun and be safe! Calories and Carbohydrates in Liquor (1 oz.) Alcohol Name Calories (kcal) Carbo Continue reading >>

Drinking On Keto To Improve Your Diet

Drinking On Keto To Improve Your Diet

Drinking alcohol in moderation benefits your health and your diet. Before you start running down the street with an Atkins bar and a bottle, there are a few things you should know. The good and bad news about alcohol How to drink on a low carb or keto diet Alcohol lists: wine, liquor, beer, mixers Yes, low carb beer. Use our low carb alcohol quick list to keep those carbs in check. Alcohol, Keto and Low Carb Diets It’s all here. The good news (there’s plenty), the bad news and the safest way to drink on your diet. One warning: Please don’t go crazy. Hangovers on low carb are nightmarish. Ask around. First, the Bad News Like fructose, alcohol is a toxin and horrible for your liver. Studies show alcohol damages the liver more when high amounts of polyunsaturated fat is also being consumed. Thankfully, the low carb diet is already very low in polyunsaturated fat, adding some protection from the damage of alcohol on the liver. Warnings for Low Carbers Ketosis lowers your alcohol tolerance, so drink slowly. Alcohol disrupts coordination and fine motor skills, and causes a loss of inhibitions. Remember that time when… Of course you don’t. Be careful. While drinking alcohol, food cravings and temptations are more difficult to resist. Alcohol acts as a diuretic, causing dehydration and electrolyte imbalances. Can I Drink on a Keto Diet? Yes, but… Once you are stable on your diet it is perfectly fine to drink in moderation. Be aware of the carbs and calories in your drink, and the slowing effect it has on fat burning. Your body has no mechanism to store the energy in alcohol, so you will metabolize the calories in alcohol first. While your body is metabolizing alcohol, it is NOT metabolizing fat. Consuming alcohol will not knock you out of ketosis completely, but it Continue reading >>

How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss – Calories And Carbs In Drinks

How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss – Calories And Carbs In Drinks

In the never-never land of diet hype, something new is on the scene. Alcoholic beverages labeled for carbohydrate and calorie content and many of them are boasting of low carb beer, low carb wine and “no carbs” liquor. You may not have noticed the labels yet, but they are either in the marketplace already or coming very soon. The labeling of beer, wine and the hard stuff for calorie content is not a bad idea and it is useful to know the caloric content of anything you’re about to consume. But what about carbs? Wine producers, on another tack, have lobbied for permission to use a “heart-healthy” label, but the agency with jurisdiction over such matters (the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, part of the Treasury Department, which has long regulated the “sinful” commodities, as well as firearms) has been cool to the idea, and has required so many disclaimers that a bottle of wine would need to come with a booklet tied around its neck. However, though the wine industry can’t simply label wine as having heart benefits, the low-carb and no-carb claims on alcoholic beverages are legal—so long as the labels don’t actually say that they help you lose weight. But, in fact, the terms are now irrevocably linked in most people’s minds (especially young people’s minds) to “weight loss,” “Atkins diet,” or even “better for you.” “Cut carbs, lose weight,” many people now think. “Low-carb” has somehow come to mean “healthy.” Nothing could be further from the truth when it comes to alcohol—and no subject could be more confused and confusing than the effect of alcoholic beverages on weight. Top 5 Low Calorie Cocktails To Drink On New Years Eve #1. LIGHT BEER (12 ounce bottle): Calories: 110 Carbs: 4.5 grams Fat: 0 grams Protein: 0 g Continue reading >>

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Intro Update May 2017: My current thoughts are not in line with this post. Read more here. It’s been little over a year since I embarked on my keto lifestyle. The nutritional approach is only a small (but important) part of my life optimization strategy. I’ve been through a lot of trial and error while trying to improve my macro partitioning. If it weren’t for the research and the books that I read throughout, I’d still be stuck in the mud. While being active on many FB groups and spamming whenever I post something new on my blog here :), I’ve seen that many people want to rush into getting results, want quick fixes, shortcuts, which gets them into nothing but trouble. So, let me try and give you my perspective on a few of the common mistakes that I see. Too much fat, too much food, poor nutrition I believe (please do not assume I generalize) eating high-fat does not mean consuming 3,000 – 10,000 kcals per day out of which 85% or more should come from fat. Doing so will lead to a possible nutrient deficient state. I tried eating 3,000+ kcals the first few days to weeks after starting the keto journey in Oct. 2013. I couldn’t do it for the long-term, especially because I was forcing myself to over-consume food. It did not feel normal or natural. I think that eating keto-friendly foods should not rely upon consuming entire sticks of butter or pouring all sorts of oils and butter into your coffee. That’s very energy rich, nutrient poor. Your body can thrive on a very-high-fat-very-low-carb diet with literally consumption of < 10g of carbohydrates per day. While releasing fats from the adipose tissue and hydrolyzing TAGs, your body can create most of its essential supply of vitamins and minerals (that’s what happens in long-term starvation too). But, for G Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

If you’re a boozy babe, you’re likely to ask the million dollar question: “Can I drink alcohol on the keto diet?” This keto diet alcohol guide will point you in the right direction. First, to answer your question: yes, you most certainly can have alcohol on the keto diet. That’s right, not all booze has carbohydrates in it! Most spirits have 0 carbs. Take a shot or four two of vodka, tequila, or gin and you’re still sitting well below your daily carb limit. A glass of white wine, like pinot or sauvignon blanc, only has about 3 net carbohydrates per serving. For the most part, you’re SOL with beer due to the gluten and high carb count. You’ll see in the table below that you can technically make some light beers fit your macros (IIFYM-style), but I’m going to go ahead and give beer a big thumbs down as a keto-approved beverage. In fact, I have a whole comprehensive list of alcoholic beverages sorted by carb count at the bottom of this post if you want to jump to the nitty gritty details of alcohol nutrition data. (CLICK HERE TO SKIP STRAIGHT TO THE KETO ALCOHOL LIST) But before you run off and get white girl wasted with celebratory low carb drinks, there’s a few things you should know about drinking alcohol while you’re in ketosis. I will admit right here and now that alcohol is by far my biggest vice. While my days of telling strangers I love them, sobbing uncontrollably over nothing, and woo-ing too loudly at concerts are over, I do still enjoy a good cocktail (Exhibit A: Vodka Mojito Recipe and Exhibit B: Kamikaze Shot Recipe, two of the keto diet alcohol drink recipes you’ll find on this site). This is a judgement-free zone. The upcoming lecture is just as much for myself as it is for you. The Obligatory Buzz-Kill Alcohol is not a nutrient. Boo Continue reading >>

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol: What to drink; When to drink, How to drink, And how it affects ketosis. You can drink alcohol in moderation on a Ketogenic Diet as long as you don't have a medical condition that would prohibit you from doing so. Alcoholic drinks DO have calories, and they come from alcohol (at 7 kcals per gram) and from carbs (at 4 kcals per gram). Your body does not have the ability to store the calories from alcohol itself, but it will store the energy from the food ingested along with it. Your body WILL metabolize alcohol before any other source of energy. So while you are metabolizing calories from alcohol, you are NOT metabolizing those from fat. To stay on track with your dietary goals, find out the caloric content of your drink, divide it by 9, then deduct this from your allowed fat grams of the day. Anecdotally, ketosis may lower your alcohol tolerance (1) so you could get drunk faster, there are some theories about the whys (2) but nothing conclusive. Alcohol also dehydrates you, so drink a glass of water along with each alcoholic beverage you consume. Not all alcohol is the same: alcohol is the product of sugar fermented by yeast. Depending on the type of sugar used, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages with different alcohol and carb content. Straight Liquors are basically zero carb, so mix any of them with water, club soda, or diet sodas to keep them carb free. Pro-Tip: if you use Tonic, make sure it is a sugar free version so it does not contain sugar and carbs! Other liquors such as Amaretto, Jägermeister, Grand Marnier, Curacao, Sweet Vermouth, Limoncello, etc. (basically anything with a hint of sweet) usually contain sugars, so you better avoid them entirely. Although wine is made from grapes and logic dictates it should be hig Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

There’s something called a ketogenic diet that a lot more people are relying on as a way to lose weight, particularly recently. So what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis, and what is the relationship between alcohol and the ketosis diet and weight loss? Below are some of the things to know about the ketogenic diet and alcohol and ketosis. Before looking at the specifics of alcohol and ketosis, what is ketosis in general? Ketosis is a term that refers to a metabolic process that your body regularly goes through. When you don’t have the glucose you need to fuel your body with energy, you’ll instead go into a mode where you’re burning stored fats. When this happens, ketones, which are a build-up of acids, are in the body. The belief with the ketogenic diet is that you can encourage your body to go into that state of ketosis or fat-burning by following a certain diet, which is low-carb. You’re basically forcing your body to eliminate fat because that’s what it’s using for energy instead of carbs. The state of ketosis frequently occurs in people with diabetes, and while it’s a normal process, some extremes are possible. If you have extreme ketosis, you’re more likely to have type 1 diabetes, as an example. If your ketone levels rise too much, it can cause your acid level in your blood to similarly rise, which can cause a condition called ketoacidosis. This can be deadly. Your body typically primarily uses glucose as energy, such as from sugary or starchy foods, but if there’s not enough of this glucose your body will then go to breaking down your stores of fat. The ketogenic diet is also called a low-carb diet, or a keto diet. It’s based on a concept of eating primarily fats, and a reduced amount of carbohydrates. While it’s relatively popular, t Continue reading >>

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Do keto diets and alcohol mix? Are there even keto alcoholic drinks? Alcohol is one of the hardest things to avoid throughout your adult life. As soon as you hit a legal drinking age, you’ll find that many of your social outings tend to revolve around drinking and having a good time. Whether you’re hitting up a club, the local pub, or gathering at a friend’s place for an intimate night in, it can be pretty difficult to avoid depending on your social situations. Lucky for me (or unlucky…), I wasn’t quite the social butterfly so I was able to steer away from alcohol for most of my diet. On the rare occasions that I did go out, I tried to limit my alcohol intake or make conscious choices to minimize negative impact on my results. How Does Alcohol Affect Keto Diets? Can alcohol knock me out of ketosis? Alcohol will not necessarily knock one out of ketosis, but it may result in stalling weight loss. While alcohol is made from fermenting starches and sugars, which are technically carbs, they are stripped of nutritional value during this process. You can treat alcohol almost as if it were a fourth macro nutrient (along with carbs, protein and fat). While the basic process of a keto diet is that you restrict your body’s carbohydrate intake so that it resorts to using fats as the main energy source. However, since alcohol is considered a toxin to your body, it is metabolized within your first before carbs and fats, which can result in stalling. Your body will need to burn through and remove the alcohol from the system before it can continue burning fat as fuel. It can also potentially cause weight loss stalls since 1g of alcohol has 7 calories which can add up quickly with all those shots. If you’re really interested in seeing the effects on your body, or if you’ Continue reading >>

Drinking And Banting?

Drinking And Banting?

One of the biggest mental obstacles for people to overcome when they start on a Low Carb High Fat lifestyle is the no alcohol recommendation. It was a big obstacle for us – when we started I didn’t have any alcohol for about the first month – which in my case with my insulin resistance was necessary. Let me explain … our weakness was red wine … about a week in to the lifestyle we made a gorgeous cheese platter with biltong and pork crackling and Vinny said, “Come on, this is crying for a glass of wine!” so I gave in and had half a glass of red wine. Up until that point I had lost 1.8kgs and low and behold when I got on the scale the next morning after that 1/2 glass of wine, I had gained the entire 1.8kgs back! And I started again from the beginning and vowed I would not have any wine … and I didn’t for a few months. Now, being less insulin resistant, I can indulge in red wine now and again and not have the same consequences but as I rule, I try and make better drink choices more in line with my low carb high fat lifestyle. So … don’t be mistaken … I recommend NO alcohol if you’re following the lifestyle strictly or if you are looking to maximise your weight-loss! Why is alcohol not recommended? Well in short … when you put alcohol in your system … fat burning stops while your body rids itself of the alcohol … that’s the very unscientific layman’s explanation. Anything that takes you out of fat burning / Ketosis should be avoided. Living a low carb high fat lifestyle is all about staying in Ketosis and running on fat. When you are out of Ketosis, it can take anywhere from a couple of days to up to 6 weeks to get back in to Ketosis … so imagine if you are drinking / cheating every second day, you will never get into ketosis and never Continue reading >>

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Egg Fast Diet Menu Plan (low Carb & Keto) And Faqs

Ok, so I’m finally posting the Egg Fast Diet menu plan! For those of you who are just catching up, I did a 5 day egg fast diet to break through a stall and get back on track with my weight loss on a keto/lchf diet. My final results were that I lost 7.4 lbs during the five days (and felt great!), then gained back .5 over the 2 days I was off the diet (typical.) I plan to do another three days starting Monday to see if I’ll lose again or if it was a one time thing. I’ll continue to post my results daily on the IBIH Facebook page and Instagram. If you’re interested in trying the Egg Fast Diet and want more details about what it is, how it works, etc., you can check out my post about it here. Basically on an egg fast you are consuming eggs, butter (or other pure and healthy fat like olive oil or coconut oil), and cheese, with a few exceptions for low carb condiments like hot sauce, mustard, etc. The egg fast ratio is to eat 1 Tbsp fat for each egg consumed and up to 1 oz cheese for each egg consumed. (Scroll down to go directly to the plan.) Before I go any further I should make it clear that I am not a doctor, nurse, or even a nutritionist. This is just me telling you what I’ve done, what the results were, and what my opinions are regarding the egg fast diet and why it works for many people. It may or not be for you – and only you can make that decision. If you have previously existing health conditions, it’s probably wise to consult with your doctor before undertaking an extremely low carb plan like this one. If you start and are really feeling poorly – don’t ignore any danger signs or red flags – stop immediately. It’s not worth risking your life over – if your body doesn’t respond well to this, I’m sure there are other things that will work f Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Is Wine Low Carb?

Is Wine Low Carb?

Is Wine Low Carb? On Friday night, I threw a party and the beverage of choice I served was wine. Also, last week someone tweeted me with the question, “Is wine a low carb drink?” So it’s time to do a blog post! The answer to the question is, yes, most wines are low carb drinks, particularly in comparison to beer in general. For example, a typical 3 oz glass of red wine has about .5g of carbohydrates! Some of the sweeter white wines are a bit more problematic, with up to about 6g of carbs per serving. However, it’s not really the carbs but the alcohol that’s the issue with wine. Here’s what Dr. Atkins had to say about alcohol on his low carb diet: “Here’s the problem with all alcoholic beverages, and the reason I recommend refraining from alcohol consumption on the diet. Alcohol, whenever taken in, is the first fuel to burn. While that’s going on, your body will not burn fat. This does not stop the weight loss, it simply postpones it, since the alcohol does not store as glycogen, you immediately go back into ketosis/lipolysis after the alcohol is used up. If you must drink alcohol, wine is an acceptable addition to levels beyond the Induction diet. If wine does not suit your taste, straight liquor such as scotch, rye, vodka, and gin would be appropriate, as long as the mixer is sugarless; this means no juice, tonic water; or non-diet soda. Seltzer and diet soda are appropriate.” An important note here about wine is that it is one of the few alcoholic drinks that is also gluten-free. If you are avoiding gluten, you can get away with wine, tequila, and gin. Pick your poison! If weight loss or fat loss is your goal, red wine is certainly far better than drinking a sugary (or corn syrupy) margarita, but keep in mind the 2-week plan (either in Atkins’ di Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet & Red Wine

Atkins Diet & Red Wine

The Atkins Diet is a controversial diet plan shrouded in myth and controversy. It works by changing the way your body powers itself, something that can only be accomplished through a dramatic alteration in eating habits. Though alcohol is not recommended while on the Atkins Diet, moderate amounts of red wine can be consumed during certain periods. Video of the Day The Atkins Diet works by forcing your body to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. This is the primary goal of the initial Induction phase of the Atkins Diet, which imposes the greatest restrictions on foods and carbohydrate intake. Ketosis is the name for this condition because a consequence of fat metabolism is the production of chemicals called ketones, or ketone bodies. In a state of ketosis, ketones are used by the brain instead of sugar as the main source of energy. Induction is so named because the goal of this phase is to induce a state of ketosis. Alcohol and Induction Just as the body will naturally burn carbohydrates for energy before fat, it will also metabolize alcohol first. Thus, drinking alcoholic beverages can interfere with the onset of ketosis. For this reason, all alcohol is forbidden during the first two weeks of Induction. One glass of wine is allowed occasionally after the first two weeks. Once you’ve entered ketosis, consuming alcohol will not necessarily reverse the process or prevent weight loss. After the first two weeks, you can enjoy red wine in moderation on the Atkins Diet, but you must count the energy in it towards your daily intake. A 3.5-ounce glass of red wine contains alcohol equivalent to about 4.3 grams of carbohydrates. Alcohol has little to no effect on the glycemic index. This means it does not cause a spike in blood sugar. If you must drink alcohol while on the Atk Continue reading >>

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