diabetestalk.net

Can You Get Ketoacidosis With Hypoglycemia?

Severe Hypoglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Results From The T1d Exchange Clinic Registry

Severe Hypoglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Results From The T1d Exchange Clinic Registry

Severe Hypoglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Results From the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry State University of New York Upstate Medical University (R.S.W.), Syracuse, New York 13210 Search for other works by this author on: Jaeb Center for Health Research (D.X., S.N.D., K.M.M., R.W.B.), Tampa, Florida 33647 Search for other works by this author on: Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes (D.M.M., A.M.), Aurora, Colorado 80045 Search for other works by this author on: Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes (D.M.M., A.M.), Aurora, Colorado 80045 Search for other works by this author on: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (M.R.R.), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 Search for other works by this author on: Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (A.L.P.), Los Angeles, California 90211 Search for other works by this author on: International Diabetes Center Park Nicollet (R.M.B.), Stanford, California 55416 Search for other works by this author on: Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Stanford University (B.H.), Stanford, California 55416 Search for other works by this author on: Jaeb Center for Health Research (D.X., S.N.D., K.M.M., R.W.B.), Tampa, Florida 33647 Search for other works by this author on: Jaeb Center for Health Research (D.X., S.N.D., K.M.M., R.W.B.), Tampa, Florida 33647 Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Kellee M. Miller, Jaeb Center for Health Research, 15310 Amberly Drive, Suite 350, Tampa, Florida 33647. Search for other works by this author on: Jaeb Center for Health Research (D.X., S.N.D., K.M.M., R.W.B.), Tampa, Florida 33647 Search for other works by this author on: Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Vo Continue reading >>

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones, ketosis, ketoacidosis, DKA…these are words that you’ve probably heard at one point or another, and you might be wondering what they mean and if you need to worry about them at all, especially if you have diabetes. This week, we’ll explore the mysterious world of ketones, including if and how they may affect you. Ketones — what are they? Ketones are a type of acid that the body can form if there’s not enough carbohydrate to be burned for energy (yes, you do need carbs for fuel). Without enough carb, the body turns to another energy source: fat. Ketones are made in the liver from fat breakdown. This is called ketogenesis. People who don’t have diabetes can form ketones. This might occur if a person does extreme exercise, has an eating disorder, is fasting (not eating), or is following a low-carbohydrate diet. This is called ketosis and it’s a normal response to starvation. In a person who has diabetes, ketones form for the same reason (not enough carb for energy), but this often occurs because there isn’t enough insulin available to help move carb (in the form of glucose) from the bloodstream to the cells to be used for energy. Again, the body scrambles to find an alternate fuel source in the form of fat. You might be thinking that it’s a good thing to burn fat for fuel. However, for someone who has diabetes, ketosis can quickly become dangerous if it occurs due to a continued lack of insulin (the presence of ketones along with “normal” blood sugar levels is not necessarily a cause for concern). In the absence of insulin (which can occur if someone doesn’t take their insulin or perhaps uses an insulin pump and the pump has a malfunction, for example), fat cells continue to release fat into the circulation; the liver then continues to churn Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 diabetes is complicated—and if you don’t manage it properly, there are complications, both short-term and long-term. “If you don’t manage it properly” is an important if statement: by carefully managing your blood glucose levels, you can stave off or prevent the short- and long-term complications. And if you’ve already developed diabetes complications, controlling your blood glucose levels can help you manage the symptoms and prevent further damage. Diabetes complications are all related to poor blood glucose control, so you must work carefully with your doctor and diabetes team to correctly manage your blood sugar (or your child’s blood sugar). Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It develops when there’s too much insulin—meaning that you’ve taken (or given your child) too much insulin or that you haven’t properly planned insulin around meals or exercise. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). There are three levels of hypoglycemia, depending on how low the blood glucose level has dropped: mild, moderate, and severe. If you treat hypoglycemia when it’s in the mild or moderate stages, then you can prevent far more serious problems; severe hypoglycemia can cause a coma and even death (although very, very rarely). The signs and symptoms of low blood glucose are usually easy to recognize: Rapid heartbeat Sweating Paleness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech For more information about hypoglycemia and how to treat it, please read our article on hy Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Ketotic Hypoglycemia

Ketotic Hypoglycemia

Ketotic hypoglycemia is a medical term used in two ways: (1) broadly, to refer to any circumstance in which low blood glucose is accompanied by ketosis, and (2) in a much more restrictive way to refer to recurrent episodes of hypoglycemic symptoms with ketosis and, often, vomiting, in young children. The first usage refers to a pair of metabolic states (hypoglycemia plus ketosis) that can have many causes, while the second usage refers to a specific "disease" called ketotic hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia with ketosis: the broad sense[edit] There are hundreds of causes of hypoglycemia. Normally, the defensive, physiological response to a falling blood glucose is reduction of insulin secretion to undetectable levels, and release of glucagon, adrenaline, and other counterregulatory hormones. This shift of hormones initiates glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver, and lipolysis in adipose tissue. Lipids are metabolized to triglycerides, in turn to fatty acids, which are transformed in the mitochondria of liver and kidney cells to the ketone bodies— acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. Ketones can be used by the brain as an alternate fuel when glucose is scarce. A high level of ketones in the blood, ketosis, is thus a normal response to hypoglycemia in healthy people of all ages. The presence or absence of ketosis is therefore an important clue to the cause of hypoglycemia in an individual patient. Absence of ketosis ("nonketotic hypoglycemia") most often indicates excessive insulin as the cause of the hypoglycemia. Less commonly, it may indicate a fatty acid oxidation disorder. Ketotic hypoglycemia in Glycogen storage disease[edit] Some of the subtypes of Glycogen storage disease show ketotic hypoglycemia after fasting periods. Especially Glycogen storage Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Ketoacidosis With Insulin Pump Therapy In Children Andadolescents.

Hypoglycemia And Ketoacidosis With Insulin Pump Therapy In Children Andadolescents.

1. Pediatr Diabetes. 2006 Aug;7 Suppl 4:32-8. Hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis with insulin pump therapy in children andadolescents. (1)Department of Pediatrics, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden. [email protected] This review deals with the two most serious side effects encountered with insulinpump therapy, severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Althoughclinical follow-up studies reported decreased rates of severe hypoglycemia,randomized studies have not confirmed this, showing no difference between thepump and injection groups. Less-severe hypoglycemia (mild/moderate/symptomatichypoglycemia) was found to be more common with pump use. Some patients haveinadvertently dosed or overdosed while awake or during sleep, causing fataloutcome in rare cases. Population-based or retrospective clinical studiesreported a low rate of DKA in pump users that was still a higher rate than those using injection therapy, at least in some countries. In research settings and forpatients with good compliance and adequate family support, the risk of DKA seems lower; many short-term studies report no DKA at all, possibly due to theincreased attention given to participants. The use of continuous subcutaneousinsulin infusion (CSII) seems to decrease the risk in patients who had recurrent DKA before pump start. Most episodes of DKA occur early after pump start,suggesting a learning curve occurs in all new forms of treatment. Increasedteaching and awareness programs are vital to prevent severe hypoglycemia and DKA in children and adolescents using insulin pumps. Diabetic Ketoacidosis/chemically induced* Continue reading >>

Dka In Hypoglycemia

Dka In Hypoglycemia

#2 0 They are two different entities. While they will both cause acidosis the mechanism of acidosis is different. DKA is from ketosis and acidosis from Hypoglycamia is lactic acid. Is this what you are asking? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment by eMedicineHealth.com An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sug Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hypoglycemia

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hypoglycemia

Under the Agent Orange Act of 1991, veterans who were exposed to herbicides during service in Vietnam may be entitled to certain presumptive diseases. One of the diseases on the presumptive list is Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Data from the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report shows that in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3% of the population has diabetes. That is an increase of nearly four million from 2010 when the estimate was 25.8 million. The highest concentration of diabetes is in our senior Americans age 65 and older at 11.8 million. Adults with diabetes have a 50% higher risk of death than adults without diabetes. Diabetics are also at a higher risk of developing serious health complications including blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. These are sobering statistics. Aging Vietnam veterans that were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are developing one or more complications or secondary conditions due to diabetes. The symptoms of diabetes include: excessive thirst, hunger, fatigue, weight loss, blurred vision, sores that won’t heal, tingling sensation in the hands or feet, and irritability. According to the American Diabetes Association, hypoglycemic attacks are on the rise in emergency rooms for adults 18 or older. Hypoglycemia is a condition where the blood glucose levels are too low. The most common cause for hypoglycemia is diabetes medication. This is because too much insulin or medication to reduce blood sugar may drop levels too far, causing hypoglycemia. Another serious condition associated with diabetes is ketoacidosis. A high ketone level in the blood system indicates that your diabetes is out of control. When the body does not have enough insulin to use glucose for energy, it starts to burn down fat. T Continue reading >>

Short Term Complications

Short Term Complications

Tweet Short term complications occur if blood glucose levels go too low or too high for the body to function properly in the present state. Short term complications can present immediate danger and therefore need to be treated quickly to avoid emergencies. What are the short term complications of diabetes? The most common short term complications of diabetes are the following: Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a state of having blood glucose levels that are too low. Hypoglycemia is defined as having a blood glucose level of below 4.0 mmol/l. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, confusion and a raised pulse rate. If you take blood glucose lowering medication such as insulin, sulfonylureas and post prandial glucose regulators, it is important to treat hypoglycemia immediately to prevent blood glucose levels from going dangerously low. Hypoglycemia can also occur in people that do not take diabetes medication but in this case, the body should low blood sugar levels naturally and treatment is not normally needed unless you have a condition known as reactive hypoglycemia or will be carrying out a dangerous task such as operating machinery or driving. Read about hypoglycemia Ketoacidosis Ketoacidosis can occur if the body spends a significant amount of time with too little insulin to refuel the cells of the body. Without insulin the body will break down fat to release ketones into the blood that can be used for energy without the need for insulin to be present. However, if the level of ketones in the blood becomes too high, ketoacidosis is said to occur, and this condition can be very dangerous. Ketoacidosis will only usually occur if the body has too little insulin and there can affect people with type 1 diabetes, people that have had a pancreatectomy (surgical removal of the pa Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Complications caused by diabetes People with diabetes must routinely monitor and regulate their blood sugar. No matter how careful you may be, there’s still a possibility that a problem might arise. There are two types of complications you may experience: acute and chronic. Acute complications require emergency care. Examples include hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. If left untreated, these conditions can cause: seizures loss of consciousness death Chronic complications occur when diabetes isn’t managed properly. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels. If not controlled well over time, high blood sugar levels can damage various organs, including the: eyes kidneys heart skin Unmanaged diabetes can also cause nerve damage. People with diabetes can experience sudden drops in their blood sugar. Skipping a meal or taking too much insulin or other medications that increase insulin levels in the body are common causes. People who are on other diabetes medications that do not increase insulin levels are not at risk for hypoglycemia. Symptoms can include: blurry vision rapid heartbeat headache shaking dizziness If your blood sugar gets too low, you can experience fainting, seizures, or coma. This is a complication of diabetes that occurs when your body cannot use sugar, or glucose, as a fuel source because your body has no insulin or not enough insulin. If your cells are starved for energy, your body begins to break down fat. Potentially toxic acids called ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fat breakdown, build up in the body. This can lead to: dehydration abdominal pain breathing problems Diabetes can damage blood vessels in the eyes and cause various problems. Possible eye conditions may include: Cataracts Cataracts are two to five times more likely to develop in people Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when the body does not have enough insulin. Insulin is what breaks down sugar into energy. When insulin is not present to break down sugars, our body begins to break down fat. Fat break down produces ketones which spill into the urine and cause glucose build up in the blood, thus acidifying the body. Because sugar is not entering into our body’s cells for energy breakdown, the sugar is being processed by the kidneys and excreted through the urine; as a result, we become dehydrated and our blood becomes even more acidic. This leads to sickness and hospitalization if not treated. If a person’s blood sugar is over 240, they should start checking their blood for ketones. If you have diabetes, or love someone who does, being aware of warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can help save a life. Early Symptoms of DKA: High blood glucose level, usually > 300 High volume to ketones present in blood or urine Frequent urination or thirst that lasts for a day or more Dry skin and mouth Rapid shallow breathing Abdominal pain (especially in children) Muscle stiffness or aches Flushed face As DKA Worsens: Decreases alertness, confusion – brain is dehydrating Deep, labored, and gasping breathing Headache Breath that smells fruity or like fingernail polish remover Nausea and/or vomiting Abdomen may be tender and hurt if touched Decreased consciousness, coma, death If you think you might have DKA, test for ketones. If ketones are present, call your health care provider right away. To treat high blood sugar, hydrate with water or sugar free, caffeine free drinks. Sugar free popsicles and snacks are also good alternatives. Always call the doctor if vomiting goes on for more than two hours. Symptoms can go from mild Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

More in ketosis