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Can You Burn Fat If You Are Not In Ketosis?

Why You Aren’t Losing Weight On Keto And What To Do About It

Why You Aren’t Losing Weight On Keto And What To Do About It

Have you hit a weight loss plateau on keto? Do you think you’re doing everything right and the scale still just won’t budge? Well don’t worry, you’re not alone. Many people have trouble losing weight on a ketogenic diet. This is because everybody is different. While the majority of people may do well on conventional keto diet advice, there will always be outliers who don’t respond as well to the same generalized guidelines. This article will outline the most common culprits of stagnating weight loss on a ketogenic diet. Hopefully, by addressing each of these possible areas of concern, you will be able to overcome your weight loss plateau and reach your ideal weight! Are You Actually in Ketosis? Believe it or not, most of the time people aren’t losing weight on keto because they aren’t actually even in ketosis! This is why it is so important to measure ketone levels. When the body runs out of stored glycogen (glucose) and begins burning fat and creating ketones for energy, these ketones circulate through the blood. This is why the gold standard for determining whether or not you are in ketosis is by measuring blood ketones. Ketosis is usually defined as a blood ketone level between 0.5 to 3.0 mM. However, for those who are not ready to invest in a blood ketone meter, there is the cheaper and more convenient option in ketosis urine strips. Ketosis strips are not quite as accurate as a blood ketone meter. This is because they only measure ketones that your body was unable to use. This may be a good way to indicate ketosis when you first begin a keto diet, but once the body becomes more efficient at burning ketones for fuel, less ketones will be excreted in the urine creating a false negative. The Carb Creep Once you start testing ketone levels it can be a lot Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

One of the most asked about aspects of livin’ la vida low-carb has got to the issue of ketosis. There is so much misinformation about there about this very natural state that the body goes through when you are on a low-carb diet (primarily confusing it with a serious condition that diabetics must be careful of called ketoacidosis–NOT the same as ketosis). As such, there may be confusion that lingers out there among my readers who are just learning about this way of eating. In this recent blog post where I provided some “quickie one-liner” responses to some e-mails, I made the following statement: Being in ketosis is like being pregnant–you either are or you’re not; regardless of what the Ketosticks show you, if you are eating less than 30g carbohydrates a day, then you ARE in ketosis.? One of my readers named Charles Fred decided to respond to my statement which he disagreed with and it gets to the very heart of this issue about ketosis. Here’s what he wrote: Your statement reflects today?’s informed opinion, but my article in work, ?Unified Physiology of the Metabolic Syndrome,? has given me an unusual perspective which for the sake of brevity I?’ll state dogmatically. Ketosis need not and should not be part of low-carb eating. Low-carb diets should never be labeled as ?ketogenic? diets. Ketosis appears to be an ?Induction? phase of low-carb eating, but in fact it is a last ditch response to inadequate glucose. As such it is either temporary or avoidable. Low-carb eating is the evolution-derived diet of humans (unlike other primates). Humans are carnivores, hunters, because human evolution happened pre-fire and pre-agriculture when very few carbs were edible. For carnivores, gluconeogenesis in the liver supplies all necessary glucose. But if someone a Continue reading >>

A Doctor On Why Ketosis Helps You Reduce Cravings & Hunger

A Doctor On Why Ketosis Helps You Reduce Cravings & Hunger

Kim Crawford, M.D., ABAARM If you're embarking on a weight-loss journey, chances are you'll run into the nutritional ketosis diet. But have you ever wondered if (and why) ketosis can help you lose weight? First, let me assure you that it can. In fact, even mainstream doctors are suggesting ketogenic diets for an entire host of patients, including those with metabolic syndrome. The beauty of the standard ketogenic diet—which consists of about 70 to 80 percent healthy fats, 10 to 20 percent protein, and 5 percent carbohydrates—is that you will not feel hungry or deprived. Ketosis can also offer health benefits that stretch far beyond weight loss. This way of eating can be beneficial for people with mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer or for athletes looking to increase their athletic performance. Here's why the ketogenic diet is a good choice for weight loss and overall health: Ketosis is a great appetite suppressant; if you are eating a standard (high-carb) American diet, you have blood sugar swings that can cause bouts of intense hunger—sometimes within as little as two hours of eating a meal! When you enter ketosis and start burning fat for fuel, your blood sugar will stabilize at a lower, healthier level. The healthy fat will be metabolized into ketones by your liver, and that will suppress your hunger via several metabolic pathways. When it comes to most hunger pangs, we're talking about ghrelin, not leptin. Ghrelin is the main hunger hormone and increases appetite. When you eat, ghrelin levels drop, if you are overweight they won't drop as much as they should. When you start to lose weight on a non-ketotic diet, your body senses that it's being starved and ghrelin levels increase. This is one reason regular diets often fail. The good news if you're on a ketot Continue reading >>

Being Fat Adapted Versus

Being Fat Adapted Versus "in Ketosis" (pt.1/3)

UPDATE!! (9/20/2017) I have a new post that explains how and why the body produces ketones, It will help you understand much better the difference between burning fat and having a fat-based metabolism, versus being "in ketosis." It's very long, but I think it's worth reading if you'd really like to understand this -- and if you want to stop freaking out about your ketone levels. (If you click over to that post and want to read only the section that explains the difference between ketosis and running on fat, scroll way down to where it says Ketogenesis: How and Why Do We Make Ketones? Also: Fat Adaptation versus Ketosis.) Happy reading! If I never hear or read those six words, in that order, ever again, I’ll be one happy individual. Based on what I come across on low-carb forums, blogs, and videos, there is a lot of confusion about the correct use of urine ketone test strips (which I’ll sometimes refer to as ketostix, since “ketone test strips” is a mouthful, even when you’re only reading). So allow me to ‘splain a little bit about how to interpret these things, and what role they should play—if any—in your low-carb life. First and foremost is the most important thing you will read in today’s post. (And it is so important that I will likely repeat it in all the posts to follow in this little series. Plus, you can tell it’s important because it’s red, bold, in italics, and all caps, hehheh.) You can be in ketosis and not lose body fat, and you can lose body fat without being in ketosis. Here is an exhaustive, comprehensive list of everything urine ketone test strips tell you: There is acetoacetate in your urine. That’s it. Nothing more. Nada más. Game over. Finito. The fat lady has sung, and Elvis has left the building. Your worth as a human being Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Ketosis occurs when your body has depleted its glycogen stores so blood sugar and insulin levels drop causing the body to look for an alternative fuel source. The fuel source that it begins to use is known as ketones which are produced by enzyme breaking down fat in the liver. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis Testing for ketosis is not the most accurate science. A blood glucose monitor or ketone test strips can show you your ketone levels but these are not always an accurate portrayal of ketosis. Instead, your body does a great job of letting you know when you’re in ketosis and shows you the signs through a number of different ways. Here are things to look out for to see if your body is in ketosis. 1. Weight Loss Weight loss is one of the more obvious signs that your body is entering ketosis. However, the weight loss can be a little deceptive initially due to what is actually being lost. In our Keto Dash program, we find that most of our member lose between 4-6 lbs in the first week of applying the keto diet. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells due to the drop in insulin. Insulin is one of the main causes of weight gain and when your insulin levels drop, they allow the fat cells to release the water they are holding. When this occurs it then allows the fat cells to enter your bloodstream where they can then enter the liver and be converted by enzymes into ketones. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet and keep your body in a caloric deficit. 2. Loss of Appetit Continue reading >>

Why High Levels Of Ketones Does Not Equal Greater Weight Loss

Why High Levels Of Ketones Does Not Equal Greater Weight Loss

2 0 In a previous posting, I spoke through the different ways in which you can measure the level of ketosis in the body. One of the points that I brought up is this notion that exists in the keto world of people being told or believing that a higher ketone reading automatically means you will experience a greater rate of weight loss. The point I stated before and I want to repeat again is a classic misinterpretation of cause and effect in that: “Just because you have a high ketone level in the body, does not mean that you will automatically experience a fat/weight loss.” I’ve been working with the application of a ketogenic diet for over 8 years now and where this notion came that high ketones=greater weight loss, I’m not too sure. Over the past couple of years though with the explosion in the popularity of a ketogenic diet, it is becoming more prolific especially amongst many keto online groups. I have had clients come to me in the past before looking for help with their diet. They have followed many “experts” advice online and it has lead them down a path of believing that the only way to success with this form of diet is all about upping the fat, driving the carbs and the protein down as much as you can. Some people coming to me were consuming as much as 80% or even 90% of their diet as fat. Now unless you have a specific therapeutic reason for following a ketogenic diet or if you really feel like that is the optimal diet for you, not many people need to be eating this much fat. Also, if you are someone that is looking to follow this diet especially for weight loss, then I promise you, adding more fat above what your body needs is going to cause you to gain, not lose weight. Where I really see this occurring, is when people are struggling to lose weight o Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet 101: Working Out On A Keto Diet

Ketogenic Diet 101: Working Out On A Keto Diet

A huge benefit that makes a keto diet very appealing to a lot of people is that they can lose fat without having to workout at all. Who wouldn’t love this in their life? You lose the weight you want while not having to change your lifestyle much at all. All you’re really changing is your eating habits and everything else can stay the same way. What about those of you that want to workout and exercise? Is this even realistic on a ketogenic diet? Working Out on a Keto Diet The short answer is yes, it’s very much possible to workout on keto without experiencing a loss of physical performance. Now, let’s get into the longer answer. Worries Most people understand that eating carbs will provide your body the energy it needs to push through a workout. This is true, but when you’re on a keto diet, your carb intake is definitely restricted. How can your body make it through a workout when it doesn’t have the “proper” fuel it needs when you’re on a carb restricted diet? Having this concern is understandable. The good news is that even if you want to be extremely active, you don’t need to have those extra carbs to have successful workouts. Your body is going to find a way to use what it already has as a source of its energy, namely the fat on your body. Carbs You should have grasped the concept by now that a keto diet allows you to have very few carbs, however, the body does need some amount of carbs during certain types of exercise. Don’t get me wrong, your carb intake will still be very restricted but you’ll be allowed more carbs than the keto user that isn’t very active. This is because your body will need the carbs as an initial energy boost. Your body is still going to burn through the carbs quickly so that little extra carb consumption will not have Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Want to be a fat-burning machine without having to count calories? Here’s a few ideas on how to get into ketosis faster on a low carb diet. Do you want to look leaner for bikini season? Yoga pants starting to feel a little tighter? One way to burn fat fast is to go on a ketogenic diet. The physiological process of burning stored fat instead of sugar, can be achieved within a short amount of time after following a strict keto diet. It is possible to get there in a day. In fact, some people show you how to get into ketosis, this fat burning state, in 24 hours. Do you need to fast? Becoming keto adapted where the body burns fat rather than sugar isn’t as hard as you might think. And, you don’t have to starve yourself to get there quickly. The great news for those who want to know how to get into ketosis faster is, well … you don’t have to fast. Fasting has been used for thousands of years by virtually every religion and traditional society. There are some people who think that a complete fast (not just intermittent fasting) is a way to get into ketosis faster. But the great thing about following a ketogenic diet is that you can eat until your heart—er, stomach—is content. You just have to eat enough of the right foods. And, of course, eat very little of the wrong foods. Is getting into ketosis safe without a doctor? Before reviewing how to get into ketosis quickly, let’s take a look at a quick background: T Continue reading >>

Ask Dr. O: Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For Me?

Ask Dr. O: Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For Me?

Question: I’m interested in building muscle in the gym. Is a ketogenic diet right for me? Answer: A true ketogenic diet is based on a strict macro breakdown of 75% fats, 20% protein and 5% carbs. By replacing your normal energy source, carbs, with fat, you train your body to burn ketones for fuel instead of glucose. This process is known as ketosis. If your goal is extreme weight loss, this diet has proven successful for many people. However, if your goal is to lose weight while maintaining muscle mass, you might want to consider an alternative. One of the down sides of a keto diet is the potential for muscle loss. In a caloric deficit, your body searches for the fuel it is being deprived of. While we’d all love for it to immediately turn to our fat stores, in reality, the body will actually start to break down muscle tissue. This is a reality on any diet, however the moderate protein intake required by the strict macro breakdown of the ketogenic diet creates an even more catabolic environment. Supplementing with amino acids can help. By providing an alternative energy source for your body, aminos can prevent muscle loss and therefore, protect your metabolic engine. The more muscle you have, the more calories you’re able to burn. This is the whole point of Keto Aminos™. This supplement not only helps you burn fat, it helps you build muscle at the same time. Contrary to popular belief, amino acids are not an enemy of keto dieters. Yes, on a ketogenic diet, anything that you consume other than fats can and will be converted into glucose. This includes protein and amino acids. However, let’s take a step back and remember the goal of the keto diet. It is not to be in ketosis just for the sake of being in ketosis. The goal of the keto diet, or any diet for that mat Continue reading >>

Do You Need To Exercise On Keto Diet?

Do You Need To Exercise On Keto Diet?

It is often said that one of the best things about following a ketogenic diet for weight loss is that you don’t have to adopt an exercise regime to lose weight. Many people don’t like the idea of working out, or think they don’t have time, and this makes the ketogenic diet appealing to them. But is it true? Constant Fat Burning Through Ketosis In essence, yes, you can lose weight, and at quite a good rate, without adding additional exercise to your daily routine. This is for two reasons inherent to the way the ketogenic diet works, which are different to the way a traditional low fat diet works: Firstly, when you are on a ketogenic diet, your body is in a state called ketosis where it is burning fat you eat and your own body fat for energy. Energy of course, isn’t just used up by exercise and conscious activity, but by everything you do. Even when your sleeping, your body needs fuel to keep itself going. Because all of this fuel is coming from fat, you don’t need to exercise to burn it off and lose weight. Secondly, because a ketogenic diet curbs your appetite, even though you don’t count calories you are likely to be eating a low calorie diet naturally. This means that your calorie use every day is likely to exceed your calorie intake, even without burning through extra calories by exercising. So, this is good news for people who are too unfit to exercise safely, or who can’t exercise because of injury or disability. It is also good news for people who just don’t want to exercise, however, don’t rule it out just on that basis… Why You Should Still Work Out if You Can If you are able to work out, from a physical perspective (everybody can make time, so being too busy is no excuse!) then you will find it has an even greater impact on the speed and eff Continue reading >>

Is A Low-carb Diet Effective For Burning Fat? Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is A Low-carb Diet Effective For Burning Fat? Is Ketosis Dangerous?

“The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.” ~William Gibson One hundred years from now, medical doctors, scientists, nutritionists, and the general public will be puzzled and astounded by how few of us were able to grasp the obvious – high-carb, low-fat diets simply do not achieve long-term fat loss. Athletes, bodybuilders, Hollywood and others have known for decades that a low-carb, high-protein diet achieves incredible fat metabolism and enables rapid muscle gains. Hundreds of scientific studies have – again and again – proven the same. Special interests have ridiculed and disparaged these approaches and prevented most of this knowledge, however, from being incorporated into conventional wisdom. While some diets do follow effective fat loss principles, many take them to extremes (Atkins, Dukan, the Ketogenic Diet, etc.), advocating weight loss at any cost. Avoiding fruits and vegetables while encouraging hot dogs and bacon binges – while it might actually help you lose weight in the short term – is not a healthy or sustainable strategy. The LeanBody System is unlike these diets in that you will achieve fat loss and muscle gains as a direct result of improving your overall health, not sacrificing it. So How Do Low-Carb Diets Work? Extreme low-carb diets push the body into ketosis, which means that the body primarily burns fat (instead of carbs) for energy and levels of ketones in the blood are elevated. Ketones are small carbon fragments created by the breakdown of fat stores after the body is depleted of stored glucose (known as glycogen). Humans can use ketones as energy for bodily functions and even as a replacement for glucose to provide fuel to the brain. Since the body relies on stored fat for energy, people lose weight – Continue reading >>

Burning Fat For Fuel Increases Quality And Quantity Of Life

Burning Fat For Fuel Increases Quality And Quantity Of Life

More than half of all Americans struggle with chronic illness, and 1 in 5 deaths in the U.S. is obesity-related. This is a direct result of eating far too much sugar and grains, too much protein and far too little healthy fat To optimize your mitochondrial function through diet, you need to eat so that your body is able to burn fat as its primary fuel rather than sugars. Ketogenic diets are very effective for this, as is fasting When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates ketones that burn more efficiently than carbs, thus creating far less reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals that can damage your cellular and mitochondrial cell membranes, proteins and DNA By Dr. Mercola Humans suffer more chronic and debilitating diseases today than ever before; more than half of all Americans struggle with chronic illness, and 1 in 5 deaths in the U.S. are obesity-related. These discouraging statistics are largely the result of an inappropriate diet. Most of us eat far too much sugar and grains, and far too little healthy fat. Many also eat too much protein, and most of it of poor quality processed food to boot. Unfortunately, the notion that glucose is the preferred fuel for your body is a pervasive one. Everyone from diabetics to top athletes are advised to make sure they eat "enough" carbs to keep their systems from crashing. This misguided advice is at the heart of many of our current health failures. It's also a driving factor in our diabetes, heart disease and cancer epidemics. Dietary fats are actually the preferred fuel of human metabolism, and this can be traced back to our evolutionary roots. One of the keys to long-term weight management and good health is healthy mitochondrial function, and for that you need to get your net carb, protein Continue reading >>

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