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Can You Build Muscle On Keto?

Can I Lose Fat And Build Muscle Using Keto And How?

Can I Lose Fat And Build Muscle Using Keto And How?

A ketogenic diet is excellent for burning fat and it's possible to maintain and/or build muscle while in a ketogenic state, although that's a bit more complicated. Keto is an extremely low-carbohydrate solution for fat-burning, requiring your body to shift from a sugar-based (glycogen) fuel system, to a primarily fat-burning fuel system. Following a low-carb diet creates a glycogen shortage, during which your body wants to start feeding on protein in muscle tissue. If you're in a state of ketosis your body switches over from glycogen to using ketone bodies (derived from free fatty acids) as fuel. Ketones are considered "protein sparing" so your body ceases to feed off of lean muscle tissue. To reach ketosis you need to reduce carbohydrate consumption to between 30 and 100 grams a day. The less carbs you consume, the faster your body achieves a ketogenic state, however it can take anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks to get into ketosis. Once your body is in keto, you want to stay there for as long as you can/your goal. Consuming too many carbs will knock you out of ketosis quickly, but flipping the switch back to a keto state isn't a quick and easy process. The protein-sparing nature of ketones makes them an ideal fuel source anyone trying to lose fat and preserve lean muscle tissue. But what if you're trying to build muscle? This is where it gets more complicated. A lot of people get confused by the relationship between carbs and building muscle. Carbohydrates are not directly required to build muscle. Your body can function properly if you're getting enough calories from protein and healthy fats, with a minimum of carbs, as well as making sure you're meeting overall nutritional requirements.. The caveat is that for optimal performance in the gym, the ideal fuel-source is g Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Muscle Building

Ketogenic Muscle Building

Do you feel incredibly sleepy and lethargic whenever you eat carbohydrate rich foods? Yes, then this Ketogenic Bodybuilding Diet will be ideal for you. You may be among the individuals out there who simply don’t tolerate carbohydrates in their diet. To help you achieve you goals you would have to follow a lower carb diet plan, which would help you feel better. The drawback? It can be harder to build muscle mass while using a very low carbohydrate diet because of the fact you aren’t providing your body with the fuel energy it needs to perform each and every muscular contraction. Well, I am going to show you exactly how to overcome this with this ketogenic Bodybuilding diet plan.​ You will however need to make some adjustments. this targeted ketogenic diet plan tends to work very well for those who are intolerant to carbs but do want to sustain intense workouts and build lean muscle. You’ll eat a very low carbohydrate diet all throughout the week and then right before and after the workout program, carbohydrates will be added which will help to fuel the body and resaturate muscle glycogen stores. The end result? You build muscle and feel great as you do. Let’s show you how to set up a targeted ketogenic diet so that you can start supporting your intense gym training with proper nutrition. Continue reading >>

More Muscle Gains And Fat Loss On A Ketogenic Diet

More Muscle Gains And Fat Loss On A Ketogenic Diet

What happens when you combine weight lifting with a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (VLCKD)? You get greater muscle gains and more fat loss than when compared to a conventional diet.1 The study looked at a group of “college aged resistance trained men”, and put them on either a conventional Western diet or a VLCKD. The conventional diet was 55% carbohydrate, 25% fat, and 20% protein, similar to what lots of people eat, though a bit higher in protein, a bit lower in fat. The low-carb diet was 5% carbohydrate, 75% fat, and 20% protein. Note that protein, the main macronutrient responsible for muscle growth, was the same in both groups. Both groups did resistance training three times a week for 11 weeks. The very low carbohydrate group gained twice as much muscle as the conventional group, 4.3 kg vs 2.2 kg. The very low carbohydrate group lost 50% more fat than the conventional group, -2.2 kg vs -1.5 kg. It should be noted that this is from a “poster presentation” at a conference, and as such has not been peer-reviewed. What could be going on here? The extra fat loss was not a surprise to me. Low-carbohydrate diets have a much better record at fat loss than do conventional diets. However, this was not a weight-loss trial, and presumably the participants ate as much as they wanted. How ketogenic diets could increase muscle gains There are several ways that muscle gains could be greater when a ketogenic diet is combined with weight training. 2 Adrenergic stimulation. Lower blood glucose (sugar) stimulates adrenaline release, which inhibits muscle protein breakdown. Although this doesn’t directly relate to gains, the breakdown of muscle is a normal, daily occurrence in healthy people, for instance with overnight fasting. Inhibiting this could mean greater gains Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis For Strength Training

Nutritional Ketosis For Strength Training

“Fat is bad for you, your cholesterol is going to go up, and so will your risk of chronic disease.” This is what many of us have been told throughout our lives, and this view point has pushed by the media, trainers, and most of the health world for many, many years. Thankfully, things have changed. Fat as a macronutrient is now being accepted as beneficial for our health (as long as it comes from good sources). Due to this acceptance of fat, more researchers and people have been experimenting with nutritional ketosis, which is extremely high in fat and low in carbohydrates. The concept is that nutritional ketosis allows the body to use fat as its main fuel source rather than carbohydrates. The prevalent thinking today is that carbohydrates are needed with protein after workouts in order to help repair muscle tissue and promote strength gains, but is this really the truth? Can we train for strength on a ketogenic diet or are we destined to wither away into scrawny prepubescents? In this piece I will discuss what nutritional ketosis is, what it means to be in nutritional ketosis, how to get there, how this influences our ability to strength train, and what to keep in mind while in nutritional ketosis during strength training. The Skinny on Nutritional Ketosis Nutritional ketosis means we are using ketones and fat as our primary fuel source not carbohydrates. Our mitochondria (the guys who make our energy) typically run on glucose if it is available. In nutritional ketosis this interaction shifts, and our body starts burning fatty acids and ketones in order to produce energy. The energy that can be produced from fat far outweighs what can be produced from glucose.1 Fat also burns much cleaner then glucose, which can result in less ROS (reactive oxygen species) which ca Continue reading >>

How To Exercise When You’re In Ketosis

How To Exercise When You’re In Ketosis

Since going keto means greatly reducing carbs, and since carbs are the body’s primary source of fuel, you might be wondering what your options are when it comes to how to exercise while in ketosis. The good news is that while there are some things to keep in mind, exercise is totally possible on the ketogenic diet and even has some big benefits health- and energy-wise. These are important to know when wading through any misconceptions around low-carb eating and working out. Exercising in Ketosis First, let’s note that the traditional view of weight loss—simply eating less and exercising longer, often with long bouts of cardio—is outdated and unsustainable. In order to see real results when it comes to losing weight and getting leaner, what you eat really matters. A great place to start is checking out a guide on sourcing meat, dairy, and seafood. Therefore, paying attention to the quality of your ketogenic diet itself, and maintaining a steady state of ketosis, is the most important first step you can take. To see if you are actually in a metabolic state of ketosis, testing your ketone levels is vitally important. However, exercise also has many benefits for your health. It’s good for the heart, builds muscle to keep you lean and toned, and strengths the bones. Thankfully, exercise can completely fit into your routine while eating for ketosis. You just need to keep in mind a few simple considerations: Type of Exercise Nutritional needs vary depending on the type of exercise performed. Workouts styles are typically divided into four types: aerobic, anaerobic, flexibility, and stability. Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio exercise, is anything that lasts over three minutes. Lower intensity, steady-state cardio is fat burning, making it very friendly for the Continue reading >>

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

There’s a number of myths, misconceptions, and misinformation floating around that are confusing a lot of people about the ketogenic diet. They’re teaching that when you’re training, whether for strength or for endurance, that carbohydrates are necessary in order to get the best results. This is not true, and I’ll tell you why. You Need Carbs To Build Muscle People that tell you this don’t understand how muscle building really works – it’s entirely possible to be gaining muscle mass while on keto. In a simple way, the 3 easy steps to build muscle are: Eating enough protein – For mass building between 1.0 – 1.2g / pound of LEAN body mass. Eating a calorie surplus – You can’t build muscle without eating more calories than you need, and these come from fats in a ketogenic diet. Training correctly – You need to promote hypertrophy in your muscles. Are carbs good for building muscle? Of course they are – they promote insulin release and help restore glycogen in the muscles. With carbs you gain mass quicker, but that’s because you’re also gaining fat. What exactly is glycogen? It’s a molecule that our bodies use as energy. What exactly does glycogen do? Wikipedia explains it nicely: In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and the muscles, and functions as the secondary long-term energy storage (with the primary energy stores being fats held in adipose tissue). Muscle cell glycogen appears to function as an immediate reserve source of available glucose for muscle cells. Other cells that contain small amounts use it locally as well. As you can see, glycogen is being used as a secondary source of energy, where fats are being used over it. Once your body has become adapted to using fats (you’re in ketosis), then Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Low-carb Diet?

Can You Build Muscle On A Low-carb Diet?

Carbs provide your body with fuel so you can lift weights and build muscle. Big servings of white bread, pasta and breakfast cereal aren't required for you to gain lean mass, though. A moderately low-carb diet that contains small servings of whole grains and starchy vegetables promotes muscle growth, too. Just be careful when structuring a low-carb plan; extremely low-carb diets that restrict you to 50 grams of carbs or fewer per day may make it harder for your body to put on muscle mass. Video of the Day Muscle Growth and Carb Benefits Carbohydrates provide fuel for your workouts, but they also help you recover afterward. Your body transforms carbs to glucose, which is stored in your muscles as glycogen -- the primary fuel source used during heavy lifting. Eating carbs after a workout refills these stores. Carbs also help stimulate muscle building by activating the hormone insulin. When you consume carbs, your insulin level rises. Insulin is instrumental in facilitating blood flow to muscles so that nutrients can flood the fibers and accelerate growth. When you ingest enough carbs, your body uses the glucose for energy to fuel organ, brain and metabolic function. When you're under-fueled, your body uses a complex process to convert muscle into energy. So, potentially, you can lose muscle on a low-carb plan. According to a 2010 study in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, carbs also stimulate the neurological system to keep your body focused and resistant to fatigue during workouts. Very Low-Carb Diets and Performance Very restrictive low-carb diets, also known as ketogenic, restrict you to 50 or fewer grams of carbohydrates per day and greatly increase your fat intake. These diets make significant muscle growth challenging. Such a diet can help yo Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Few topics in bodybuilding seem as divisive as the keto diet. Some love being in ketosis and believe ketones to be a superior fuel source to glucose while others claim that following a keto diet is unnecessarily restrictive and even dangerous. The truth is that the ketogenic diet is perfectly safe for almost everyone and even has therapeutic uses. It is very effective at treating epilepsy after medicine has failed and has been shown to help mitigate the symptoms of dementia caused by alzheimer’s disease. There is even evidence that when combined with a relatively high caloric restriction, a ketogenic diet can shrink tumors and may possibly kill off cancer cells. But what about ketosis for the average healthy individual? Is the ketogenic diet appropriate for a bodybuilding lifestyle, in particular for gaining muscle? First lets delve into what ketosis really means and the variations of the ketogenic diet. Take a peek at the ketogenic food period. Ketosis is the process your body goes through when glycogen stores are depleted and you are not consuming carbohydrates to replenish them. Typically, after a few days of being in this glycogen-depleted state your body will get the picture that no more glucose is coming so it better find a new fuel source. This is when the liver begins to produce ketone bodies from fatty acids which will enter the bloodstream and be used much the same way glucose would be. Once carbohydrates are reintroduced into the diet and glucose enters the bloodstream the body will stop producing ketones and resort to using the glucose for energy once again. There are a few different approaches to take when it comes to ketogenic diets. Standard Ketogenic Diet SKD is the traditional low-carb ketogenic diet. You consume high amounts of fats, moderate amounts Continue reading >>

Keto Build Muscle And Burn Fat At The Same Time

Keto Build Muscle And Burn Fat At The Same Time

The ultimate goal when it comes to body composition and fitness is to build muscle and burn more fat. For vanity and looking good, surely. But there are other health and longevity benefits to this. Muscle is actually our biggest organ, as the fascia connect all the dots between our ligaments, creating a tissue that covers our entire body. The advantages to having a lean physique are obvious, as it will increase our metabolism, increase our life span, improve nearly every biomarker and actually sharpens our cognition. What You Need for Muscle Growth Building muscle is an anabolic process that needs to be facilitated in some way. There are 4 main conditions that need to be met. An Adequate Stimulus (Train Hard Enough) – Resistance training that makes the muscle fibers contract at near maximum effort signal the body to adapt to the stimulus. If there’s a perceived necessity in your environment to be stronger, then you will eventually get stronger. It’s the first determining factor of muscle hypertrophy. Protein Synthesis (Eat Enough Protein) – Training causes scarring damage to your muscle fibers that needs to be repaired, if you were to recover from the stimulus. Amino acids found in protein are essential building blocks of our organism. They’re used for growing lean tissue, skin, nails, hair – everything. Enough Energy (Be at a Caloric Surplus) – All of this is a costly process and requires heat to be carried out. Muscle growth will occur only if there’s a surplus of energy – when the body has managed to cover its more vital functions. Hormonal Output (Mainly Testosterone and Human Growth Hormone) – Hormones are your body’s signaling mechanisms that send messages to conduct certain processes e. protein synthesis, muscle building, fat burning. All of Continue reading >>

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Body Composition Set your current weight, in pounds or kilograms, and your bodyfat percentage. (How to visually estimate bodyfat %) Activity Level (not counting exercise): Set your usual activity level. This does not include additional exercise like gym, running, etc. If not known, choose Sedentary. Choose "Custom" to set your TDEE manually. Multipliers for activities are taken from Chapter 8 of "Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 5th Edition" Daily Calories Set your goal to get your recommended calorie intake. If you used the Exercise Info section above, then you can compare calories for those days that you exercise and those that you don't. It is not recommended to go over 25% deficit for fat loss or over 15% surplus for muscle gain. Daily Exercise Info If needed, set your exercise information for those days that you will be exercising. (Click here for Kcal / min calculations). This will allow you to compare calorie limits on those days that you exercise against those that you don't. Activity Minutes Kcal burned / min Total Kcal burned Weights Cardio Other Daily Macros Adjust your protein ratio: To maintain muscle, leave protein ratio between 0.69 to 0.8. It is not recommended to drop below 0.69 or muscle loss may occur. To gain muscle, the protein ratio should be between 0.8 to 1.2. There is normally no advantage to consuming more than 0.82g/lb (1.8g/kg) of protein per day to preserve or build muscle once you're past the novice level as a natural trainee. Source. Adjust the carbs and fat grams to reach daily calorie goals. If doing a Standard Ketogenic Diet, carbs should be set lower than 30g: It is suggested you count carbs as TOTAL for all foods, except for green veggies and avocado, on those count as NET. Protein Ratio Macronutrients Macro Grams Kcal per gra Continue reading >>

Burn Fat With A Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

Burn Fat With A Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet What is a cyclical ketogenic diet and how does it help one burn fat? By the way, what even constitutes an optimal physique? This is different based on each individual’s unique genetic potential but researchers would agree that we should have a moderate to thin structure and good muscular development. While many have sought after a thin physique, the mantra of the 21st century is that strong is the new thin! We want to have a good body fat percentage (6-15% for men and 15-30% for women) and have developed well-toned musculature. This article discusses how to build muscle and burn fat with a cyclical ketogenic diet Ketogenic Diet and Fat Metabolism: A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the bodies metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). The ketogenic diet is built around good fats such as grass-fed butter, coconut products, avocados, nuts/seeds, pasture-raised animal products and extra-virgin olive oil. This diet should also focus on low-carbohydrate fruits, vegetables and herbs as staple components. The fat levels will be between 60-80% of calorie intake. How Ketones Are Formed? The body has two major energy sources, it burns glucose or ketone bodies. The majority of people burn glucose primarily because they are constantly supplying a steady form of sugar, starches and proteins that can be turned into blood sugar. When one either fasts or goes on a low-carb, moderate protein and high fat diet they switch their energy source to fat. In particular, the fatty acids are broken down into keto Continue reading >>

Building Muscle In Ketosis

Building Muscle In Ketosis

A friend of mine recently asked me how easy it is to ‘bulk up’ or build muscle, when you’re in nutritional ketosis. If you’re not familiar with this term, it’s when your body transitions to burning ketone bodies derived from fat for energy, instead of glucose from carbohydrates. In simple terms, your body is in fat burning mode, not sugar burning mode. In our modern day diet, we are led to believe that we need high glycemic carbohydrates 3 times a day to give us energy (such as grains in breakfast cereals, bread and pasta, and rice and potatoes), maybe more frequently than that if you’re a regular feeder and like to snack. The trouble is, that when we consume high glycemic carbs like this three times a day or more, for a long period of time, it leads us to becoming insulin resistant (leading to type-2 diabetes) and that leads to inflammation, particularly if you are inactive. When you train regularly, this can prevent or slow the rate at which your cells can become insensitive to insulin. Nutritional ketosis is a very cool way of burning fat and also becoming sensitive to insulin again. I believe it’s the best way to get lean and stay lean in combination with intermittent fasting. It’s actually a survival mechanism and is perfectly safe as long as you’re not depriving your body of crucial micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) from plant-based foods and healthy fats and decent sources of protein. Going back to ancestral times, hunter gathers would firstly, not be feeding on any type of grain (which are inflammatory), and secondly, not be consuming 3 large meals at regular intervals throughout the day and a considerable carbohydrate overload. They would go for days without feeding at all and would have a huge meal in one sitting (apparently…I’ve not Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

Keto Workouts – How They Help Me Build Muscle & Lose Fat, Fast

Keto Workouts – How They Help Me Build Muscle & Lose Fat, Fast

My Keto Workouts This is the first post for a new series about keto workouts. It features the workouts, diet, supplements, and other health and fitness stuff I’m trying out and testing while in nutritional ketosis. My goal is to help both you, the reader, and myself, learn the best ways to eat, exercise, sleep, and supplement, etc. for optimal health and performance. Not only will it save us all time and money using what actually works, but you can read about a first hand experience of keto workouts. I’m currently following a low carbohydrate diet with a goal of getting into nutritional ketosis for several hours a day, at a minimum. By fasting everyday, eating every 20 hours or so, supplementing with MCT Oil, its working. For dinner, my meals consists of 70% fat, 10% carbs, and 20% protein. Below I list specifics about my dinner plan for those who are interested in trying it! My training is focused on total body workouts using kettlebells, sandbags, etc. My daily goal is to train every morning at 4:30 A.M. Changes In My Daily Life Resulting From Nutritional Ketosis Sleeping While In Nutritional Ketosis I wake up at 3:30 A.M. everyday, usually without my alarm. Finally, after years of troubled sleep, I now get 7 1/2 hours, which has become the status quo! In the past, I would wake up every few hours, and have bad dreams. The result was dreading my morning workout and finding it very hard to feel refueled and ready to perform explosive movements on an empty tank. You know how it feels, like doing farmers walks in quick sand. We can all agree that sleep is one of the most effective ways to repair fatigue and sluggishness. Joint Pain And Nutritional Ketosis About a week into nutritional ketosis, I noticed that the joint pain in my knees and elbow was completely gone! Th Continue reading >>

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