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Can You Be In Ketosis And Gain Muscle?

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past year or so, then you’ve most likely heard of the ketogenic (or keto) diet. If you have been living under one, I’m going to need you to crawl out from under it and take a seat because Ketogenic Dieting 101 is about to begin. So, Like, What Is It? Keto is a diet with high fats, moderate protein, and restricted carbohydrates. Initially designed to help children with epilepsy, it’s garnered attention for its effectiveness in regards to fat loss. The traditional ketogenic diet (also known as the therapeutic ketogenic diet), mimics the effects of starvation by forcing the body to burn its own fat stores rather than glucose. When you restrict carbohydrates, the body enters into a metabolic state known as ketosis, where the liver converts stored fat (triglycerides) into ketones. These ketones are what the body uses to fuel your brain, organs, and muscles. On the therapeutic ketogenic diet, the macro breakdown looks like this: However, as the ketogenic diet’s grown in popularity, especially among people who are looking to lose fat and build muscle, a new form of the diet’s emerged. While the traditional ketogenic diet is an extremely high-fat diet with sufficient protein intake, the physique ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet but with adequate protein intake. Huh, Sufficient and Adequate Protein Intake? This is where a lot of the confusion arises around the ketogenic diet, and it’s important to understand the difference. When the goal is fat loss, the concomitant goal is to preserve muscle mass. On a therapeutic ketogenic diet, protein is set to around 10-15% of total calorie intake. This is the sufficient amount of protein required to keep the body functioning and you healthy – basically so you don’t die. The Continue reading >>

Can You Gain Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Gain Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Listen in to Ketotalk Podcast #19 where we talk about inflammatory foods, building muscle with a ketogenic diet & how ketosis affects the Baby Boomer Generation. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona Osteopath and Board Certified Obesity Medicine physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam answer more engaging questions about nutritional ketosis from you the listeners. Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight On Low Carb Or Keto

How To Gain Weight On Low Carb Or Keto

Do you want to gain weight? Given how most nutrition articles focus on fat loss, maybe you feel in a minority there. The usual advice for weight gain is to eat a higher amount of carbohydrates to “bulk up” and adopt an exercise program. Unfortunately it often results in mainly gaining fat mass, and is not necessarily healthy. This page will examine how to gain weight the healthy way, while staying on a low-carb diet, and has the following subsections: Low-carb for weight gain? While most people see a low-carb diet as a weight-loss diet, this is not necessarily true. Low carb tends to lead to weight loss for people with excess weight, due to increased satiety and fat burning. However, low-carb foods are very nutrient dense, and can assist lean weight gain in people who are underweight. Eating low carb, and eating when hungry, can be considered a weight-normalizing diet (or lifestyle). 1. Why do people want to gain weight? It’s true that most people today are looking to lose weight, but some also want to gain weight. While the majority just want to add a few extra pounds to a skinny frame, others wish to build muscle and increase in size. So, what are the reasons people want to gain weight? That depends on the goal, but here are several: Gain more strength Sporting objectives For better metabolic health (muscles burn more fat) Combat aging (muscle-density loss is a natural side effect) Improve self-confidence To possibly improve overall health (in those who are too skinny) All of these are understandable aims where weight gain could possibly benefit someone’s life. Problems caused by pressure to gain weight Unfortunately, this desire for weight gain often causes problems. This is especially the case in young men, with more than 8.5% of people extremely concerned a Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: How To Lose Fat, Gain Muscle And Feel Fantastic

Intermittent Fasting: How To Lose Fat, Gain Muscle And Feel Fantastic

If you want to know the secret to losing fat, gaining muscle and feeling fantastic then look no further than intermittent fasting. The science behind intermittent fasting tells us that it’s not just what you eat but WHEN you eat as well. For thousands of years different cultures such as the Essenes have only eaten at specific times of the day or optimal health, which is known as intermittent fasting. Now intermittent fasting is one of the latest crazes amongst bodybuilders and athletes. This is because it allows you to lose a lot of fat whilst keeping strong because it’s a process that allows you to maintain or even build muscle. To understand how intermittent fasting benefits us first it’s good to understand the different functions of our digestive system throughout the day. Basically there’s three 8 hour periods, one for detoxification, one for digestion and one for nutrition assimilation. Eating only during the digestion period is the key to intermittent fasting. I would even say that if you didn’t change your diet, but just ate within the ‘digestion period’, you would already deeply and radically improve your health, but obviously having a healthy whole food diet takes you next level of optimal eating. Let’s take a look at these three eight-hour periods Intermittent Fasting Period 1 – Detoxification: 4am to 12noon This is the optimal time for your body to be in detoxification. Yep, no eating and I know you might be thinking this is tough, but I wake up early, see clients, do stretching and strength training and all kinds of things without eating during this time. You will be okay!! Your body stores all the essential amino acids and everything that you need to keep functioning. When you go to bed at night and wake up in the morning your body has bur Continue reading >>

Using A Ketogenic Diet To Get Lean And Ripped – Benefits And Drawbacks

Using A Ketogenic Diet To Get Lean And Ripped – Benefits And Drawbacks

The Ketogenic Diet is getting lots of attention- with tabloid websites publishing typical hype weight loss stories about vacuous celebs like Kim Kardashian, zealous bloggers pushing keto keywords to sell books about weight loss and health benefits they’ve yet to experience (you know who you are), obesity rates increasing, and an increasing portion of the populace fed up with being fat and sickly, this high-fat low-carbohydrate method for shedding excess body fat is getting lots of buzz. Keto style diets can be a highly effective way to shed bodyfat and maintain lean muscle mass while improving health and biomarkers and it’s not just a fad- low carb diets have been used to lose body fat for hundreds of years. Let’s talk about the basics. Without getting too much into the many health benefits that a ketogenic diet may offer, we will keep our focus on keto for body composition and fat loss. what is a ketogenic diet? what are the benefits of a ketogenic diet? what are the drawbacks of a ketogenic diet? What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a low carbohydrate diet where the body relies on fat for fuel rather than glucose. It is a low-carb, high-fat, moderate protein diet (depending on the individual and goals, 1-2 g/kg of lean body mass in protein per day is usually adequate). When carbohydrates are restricted (for many people below 50 grams per day of net carbs, carb tolerance for ketosis varies for all individuals) and the bodys glycogen is depleted, the liver begins creating ketone bodies out of fatty acids to fuel the brain. These ketones can be measured with ketone strips on a blood glucometer- over .5mmol/liter is considered “ketosis”. The small amount of glucose necessary for certain parts of the brain can be synthesized from amino acids and the body Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Can You Gain Muscle And Lose Fat At The Same Time?

Can You Gain Muscle And Lose Fat At The Same Time?

We live in sad times for bodybuilding. Although broscience is finally losing face, it’s being replaced by what I can only describe as bodybuilding nihilism (”˜nothing-ism’). Nothing supposedly matters. Nutrient timing? Just eat when you feel like eating. Full-body or split training? Whichever you prefer. Eating clean? Bro, what has washing your food got to do with anything? Skepticism is great, but it’s turning into pessimism that’s killing the spirit of bodybuilding to always keep improving and always push the limits. The nihilism that nothing matters has taken the meaning that nothing works. When nothing works, nothing is possible. If somebody gains muscle during their contest prep, he is immediately accused of steroid use. That’s because many people believe you cannot build muscle and burn fat at the same time. Others say it’s theoretically possible, but it won’t ever happen in anyone but absolute beginners and steroid users. And yet others say body recomposition programs are the best way to progress and you shouldn’t cut or bulk as a natural lifter. Let’s look at the facts. The First Law of Thermodynamics You’ve probably heard someone argue that achieving muscle growth and fat loss in the same day is physically impossible because of thermodynamics. The argument goes as follows. To build muscle, you must store energy. To lose fat, you must burn energy. When you are in energy surplus, your body stores energy. When you are in a deficit, your body loses energy. Therefore, you must be in energy surplus to gain muscle and in a deficit to lose fat. The first two points, the premises, are true. They refer to the first law of thermodynamics (”˜movement of energy’), also called the law of the conversion of energy. This law means energy cannot just Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The other day, I was on a phone call with a good friend and fellow strength coach, Joe Dowdell, CSCS, of Peak Performance in New York City. I told him my current deadlift personal record stood at a respectable 420 pounds but that I aspired to pull a 500. He told me it was "doable." Great. Then I threw him a curveball worthy of Dodgers southpaw Clayton Kershaw. I wanted to add 80 pounds to my deadlift … while following a ketogenic diet. Joe let out a big sigh. Staying on a ketogenic diet means eating so few carbohydrates that when your glycogen stores empty, your body cashes-in on a process called 'ketosis' for energy. The carbohydrate threshold to stay in ketosis will vary by individual, but the guideline for most folks is fewer than 50 grams of carbs. I was dead-set on eating fewer than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. How low is that? One medium banana would place you over your daily limit! Wait, don't carbs stimulate muscle growth? How could this work in the long term? More important, can I add 80 pounds to my deadlift without eating much carbs? These questions and more piqued the scientist in me. So I set out to find the answers not only by poring over the scientific literature but through real-world application on the gym floor as well. Now before you rush down to the bottom of the article to see if I did it, I want to preface the grand finale by explaining the anabolic capacity of carbohydrates. Let me walk you through several key areas of anabolism in which carbohydrates and insulin play a role. Carbohydrates, Protein, and Insulin Carbohydrates create anabolism largely by setting off a cascade of hormone-driven events. (Just so we're clear, you also get an insulin response from protein as well.) Chief among these events is secretion of a hormone called insuli Continue reading >>

Gaining Weight On The Keto Diet? You’re Not Alone!

Gaining Weight On The Keto Diet? You’re Not Alone!

The Ketogenic Diet is suppose to be the best thing since sliced bread (no bun intended. Yes, bun, not pun, cause carbs). And like me, you also tried the Ketogenic Diet to see if all its fat burning potential was going to melt all the stubborn bubbler off your body​. Chances are that if you are reading this, that didn't happen. In fact, you likely started gaining weight on the keto diet​. What the hell, right?! In this article I am going to lay out for you why you are gaining weight on the keto diet, share a little bit of my experience eating keto, and then tell you how to ​make the keto diet work for you so you can continue to burn fat! Why You are Gaining Weight on the Keto Diet I could sit here and list at least 5 reasons why people are gaining weight on the keto diet, but I'll simplify it down to one simple reason. The early settlers on the land of Ketosis Island had this crazy idea that because dietary fat does not stimulate the release of insulin, which is a fat storing hormone, that ketosis could effectively circumvent the long standing law of energy balance, aka calories in vs calories out. While energy balance is not the only rule when it comes to whether calories are used for output or stored for later use, in most healthy people, calories in verses calories out sits at the top of the energy balance spectrum. If you were one of the unfortunate souls who got advice from one of these people early on, before the science started coming out, chances are you ignored the amount of calories you were eating during the keto diet and gained fat weight along the way. That's what happened to me. I love to eat, so when I heard there was a diet out there that could effectively eliminate the worry of calories simply by reducing carbohydrates to zero, I was sold. I follow Continue reading >>

Here's How Overweight People Can Drop Fat And Build Muscle At The Same Time

Here's How Overweight People Can Drop Fat And Build Muscle At The Same Time

Can we build muscle and drop body fat at the same time? Well, the question has been lingering for quite some time now. While a lot of fitness coaches claim that it is impossible and the reasons they use to support their claims are also quite logical, to some extent, it really isn’t. Arguments That Say ‘It Isn’t Possible’ Because- 1) Calories need to be significantly cut to drop a decent amount of body fat. 2) In contrast to the above statement- a calorie surplus is essential to pack on serious muscle, and therefore, one cannot sail in two boats at the same time. Now, as I said, the above statements are logical but only to some extent. Science Says You Can The good news is, we can definitely pack on muscle and drop body fat at the same time. However, there are a few conditions applied to the same. Before getting into the nitty-gritty of how it actually happens, let me clear up one more fact- fat does not convert into muscle, fat remains fat. And muscle, remains muscle. Now, to build muscle, we need energy support in order to achieve muscle hypertrophy. And, that is the reason we need a caloric surplus to gain muscle. So does this mean that an overweight boy cannot build muscle while dropping body fat? Hell, yes. He certainly can. But don’t expect to come out looking like a jacked dude. According to a few recent research papers, only a fat person has the advantage to build muscle and drop body fat simultaneously. Pretty logical, as the energy reserves the person has in the form of fat deposits acts as fuel. How It Actually Happens Since muscle hypertrophy requires energy support, one can pack on muscle if the stored fat is converted into energy using intense resistance training. Moreover, certain research also claims that fat can be utilized for muscle hypertrop Continue reading >>

Building Muscle In Ketosis

Building Muscle In Ketosis

A friend of mine recently asked me how easy it is to ‘bulk up’ or build muscle, when you’re in nutritional ketosis. If you’re not familiar with this term, it’s when your body transitions to burning ketone bodies derived from fat for energy, instead of glucose from carbohydrates. In simple terms, your body is in fat burning mode, not sugar burning mode. In our modern day diet, we are led to believe that we need high glycemic carbohydrates 3 times a day to give us energy (such as grains in breakfast cereals, bread and pasta, and rice and potatoes), maybe more frequently than that if you’re a regular feeder and like to snack. The trouble is, that when we consume high glycemic carbs like this three times a day or more, for a long period of time, it leads us to becoming insulin resistant (leading to type-2 diabetes) and that leads to inflammation, particularly if you are inactive. When you train regularly, this can prevent or slow the rate at which your cells can become insensitive to insulin. Nutritional ketosis is a very cool way of burning fat and also becoming sensitive to insulin again. I believe it’s the best way to get lean and stay lean in combination with intermittent fasting. It’s actually a survival mechanism and is perfectly safe as long as you’re not depriving your body of crucial micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) from plant-based foods and healthy fats and decent sources of protein. Going back to ancestral times, hunter gathers would firstly, not be feeding on any type of grain (which are inflammatory), and secondly, not be consuming 3 large meals at regular intervals throughout the day and a considerable carbohydrate overload. They would go for days without feeding at all and would have a huge meal in one sitting (apparently…I’ve not Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Few topics in bodybuilding seem as divisive as the keto diet. Some love being in ketosis and believe ketones to be a superior fuel source to glucose while others claim that following a keto diet is unnecessarily restrictive and even dangerous. The truth is that the ketogenic diet is perfectly safe for almost everyone and even has therapeutic uses. It is very effective at treating epilepsy after medicine has failed and has been shown to help mitigate the symptoms of dementia caused by alzheimer’s disease. There is even evidence that when combined with a relatively high caloric restriction, a ketogenic diet can shrink tumors and may possibly kill off cancer cells. But what about ketosis for the average healthy individual? Is the ketogenic diet appropriate for a bodybuilding lifestyle, in particular for gaining muscle? First lets delve into what ketosis really means and the variations of the ketogenic diet. Take a peek at the ketogenic food period. Ketosis is the process your body goes through when glycogen stores are depleted and you are not consuming carbohydrates to replenish them. Typically, after a few days of being in this glycogen-depleted state your body will get the picture that no more glucose is coming so it better find a new fuel source. This is when the liver begins to produce ketone bodies from fatty acids which will enter the bloodstream and be used much the same way glucose would be. Once carbohydrates are reintroduced into the diet and glucose enters the bloodstream the body will stop producing ketones and resort to using the glucose for energy once again. There are a few different approaches to take when it comes to ketogenic diets. Standard Ketogenic Diet SKD is the traditional low-carb ketogenic diet. You consume high amounts of fats, moderate amounts Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

Using Keto To Build Muscle

Using Keto To Build Muscle

With the right nutrition ratio, low carbers enter a rapid fat-burning state called ketosis. The ideal protein-fat-carb ratio gives low carb dieters three huge advantages. These low carbers: Burn more fat. Lose more weight. Keep their hard-earned muscle. Most diets restrict daily calories, so you lose weight. The bad news: some of that weight loss is fat and some is lean muscle tissue. When we aren’t getting enough calories, we access other forms of stored energy, like muscle. The body tries to preserve fat stores and is perfectly willing to sacrifice muscle instead. Less muscle means a slower metabolism, which makes losing weight even more difficult and gaining it back all too simple. Low Carb Saves Muscle In most weight loss diets, at least some lean body mass is sacrificed to weight loss. Low carb diets are different. Low carbers retain the greatest amount of lean body mass compared to restricted-calorie and high carb diets. Low Carb and Keto Low carbers enter a special, metabolic state of ketosis where the body uses it’s consumed and stored fat for fuel. Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers to use fat over glucose for energy. Since the body has extra stored fat, there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose (a process called gluconeogenesis). In ketosis, your body is far less likely to utilize your lean body mass (muscle and organ tissue) as fuel. It doesn’t need to, it already has plenty of fat for energy. Ketosis Tests Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are used to detect ketones in the urine, a sure sign of ketosis. I must admit: I love seeing dark purple on the end of my keto test strip. Keto sticks are a good detector of ketosis, but if the strip doesn’t register the presence of ketones, you can still be ket Continue reading >>

Training On A Ketogenic Diet: Can You Build Muscle Without Carbs?

Training On A Ketogenic Diet: Can You Build Muscle Without Carbs?

If you’re like me and have done even a casual search for information about ketogenic diets before, you have probably come across an assortment of information that seems biased, inconclusive, contradictory, promotes myths or debunks them, is semi-authoritative, and mildly useful or just downright misleading. I think I pretty much just summed up most results for just about any search done on the Internet. It can be frustrating clicking and scrolling up and down tons of information for answers that you feel should be straightforward and consistent across all channels if based on any truth. For example, have you heard that ketogenic diets promulgate poisons in the body? Due to the controversiality of ketones, there may be some ambiguity about whether ketogenic diets can successfully help with the building of muscle without the high consumptions of carbohydrates. Before we delve into the topic, I want to clarify a thing or two about ketosis to make sure you and I are on the same page as far as fundamentals of ketosis. Just about anyone who abruptly switches from an everyday diet that is high in carbs to one that is low-carb experiences a state of ketosis. It is a healthy and natural physiological state that presents itself in the form of elevated ketones in the blood. Video source: Ketogenic Supplements The three ketone body substances resulting from fat metabolism are acetone, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic. Don’t panic! I know acetones are a common household solvent and an active ingredient in many nail polish removers, but the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry confirms that naturally higher-than-average amounts of acetones in the body “usually don’t cause health problems.” Acetones are helpful in the breaking down of fat in the body. Ad Continue reading >>

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