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Can You Be In Ketosis And Gain Muscle?

Building Muscle Efficiently: Beta-hydroxybutyrate

Building Muscle Efficiently: Beta-hydroxybutyrate

The problem isn’t building muscle; the problem is keeping muscle. If you are an athlete with lean muscle mass goals, you understand this problem all too well. Weeks of gains in the gym can be undone with a few days off. This phenomenon is known as protein breakdown, which is actually a result of exercise. Intense anaerobic training can cause microscopic tears in muscle fibers. The body usually repairs and builds on the existing muscle to make it stronger, but it will also break down some of that muscle for fuel. You can prevent this muscle breakdown through various methods, but one of the most important factors for creating lean, large muscles is the use of a beta-hydroxybutyrate supplement. Beta-Hydroxybutyrate Beta-Hydroxybutyrate, or hydroxybutyric acid is one of the three ketone bodies that are produced by the liver when it breaks down fatty acids. It is mainly used for cellular fuel in the absence of glucose. Many individuals have begun utilizing ketone bodies as their main source of cellular fuel by adopting what is known as a nutritional ketosis diet. By consuming high amounts of fat, moderate amounts of protein, and virtually no carbohydrates, you can put your body into a state of ketosis that can burn off excess fat and provide you with large amounts of energy.* The problem with adopting a nutritional ketosis diet is that this extreme nutritional profile can provide drawbacks for the elite athlete. In order to get the benefits without having to adopt the diet, athletes can supplement their daily diet with Beta-Hydroxybutyrate supplements such as Keto-OS.* Benefits of Ketosis Using a ketone body supplement properly can create a state which is known as ‘optimum ketosis’ in the body. In this state there are adequate levels of ketone bodies in the blood to cr Continue reading >>

Building Muscle On Keto: Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Building Muscle On Keto: Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

He wasn’t overweight, but wanted to lose some fat and gain some muscle while he was at it. And, after reading a bunch of articles, he was convinced that a ketogenic diet was the best way to go about it. Google around for information on ketogenic diets and muscle growth, and you’ll come across the many great and wonderful things that happen when you cut carbs from your diet. Fat will be lost. Muscle will be gained. You’ll recover more quickly, feel less sore, and get stronger faster. Critics of the diet say the exact opposite. Ketogenic diets limit your ability to train hard. Trying to build muscle without carbs is like Batman patrolling the streets of Gotham without his utility belt. There’s absolutely no way, they say, to add muscle while you’re in ketosis. As it turns out, both sides can bring data to the table to support their point of view. SIDE NOTE: If you want a basic overview of the ketogenic diet, as well as more information about the pros and cons, Jeff Cavaliere explains more in the video below. The Ketogenic Diet and Muscle Growth Fans of keto dieting point to research showing that low levels of muscle glycogen don’t have an adverse effect on your performance in the gym [1]. That lifting weights with low levels of muscle glycogen doesn’t impair the anabolic response to resistance exercise [2]. And that the consumption of carbohydrate has no effect on muscle protein synthesis above and beyond the consumption of protein alone [3]. On the other hand, keto critics claim that low carb diets limit your ability to train hard [4]. That lifting weights with low levels of muscle glycogen dampens the post-training anabolic response [5, 6]. And that carbs are anti-catabolic, playing a key role in preventing the breakdown of muscle tissue [7]. Who’s right Continue reading >>

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

Here's what you need to know... Ketosis occurs when carbs are in such low quantities that your body relies almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. Ketogenic diets have about 70-75% of your daily caloric intake coming from fat and about 5% from carbohydrates. Ingesting protein above approximately .8 grams per pound is enough to kick you out of ketosis. Ketogenic diets improve body comp, but so does any diet that reduces calories from any source. There is no literature to support that a ketogenic diet is beneficial for promoting increases in muscle mass. Ketogenic diets affect performance negatively. Questions About Ketosis While the ketogenic diet has been used widely and rather effectively in some cases, there's still a lot of confusion about it. What exactly is a ketogenic diet? How does it differ from low carb dieting? Most importantly, at least for the T Nation demographic, is the question of whether ketogenic diets allow you to put on, or at least keep, muscle. Ketosis: What is it? Ketosis is a metabolic state that occurs when dietary carbohydrates are in such low quantities that your body must rely almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. That sounds simple on the surface, but let's unpack that explanation a bit. To function, your body requires a substantial amount of energy in the form of ATP. So, let's just assume that the average person uses about 1,800 calories per day to create enough ATP to keep him alive (not including any physical activity). Now this is where it gets interesting. You have this thing in your skull called a brain. It uses about 400 or so calories per day and runs almost exclusively on glucose. (There's some evidence it can use small amounts of fat and lactate, but in the big picture it's not Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets For Bulking

Ketogenic Diets For Bulking

The ketogenic diet is nothing new. The high fat, low or no carbohydrate diet was first developed in the 1920s as a treatment for pediatric epilepsy. In recent history, the ketogenic diet has been used by the bodybuilding and strength training community as one of the most popular and controversial ways to improve body composition. The diet was initially developed as an alternate means to fasting, which was found to induce the state of ketosis in the patient (1). Early physicians found not only a decreased frequency of epileptic seizures in patients who were in ketosis but also accelerated fatty acid oxidation, which then led to the loss of body fat. Ketosis is often referred to as the body’s “fat burning” mode (2). Some benefits often associated with ketogenic diet include: Reduction in body fat Appetite suppression Mood elevation and mental clarity (after the initial weaning period of 3-5 days) Stable blood glucose levels Reduced cardiovascular risk factors (chronically elevated insulin, triglycerides, etc.) Lowered cancer risk (cancer cells thrive on glucose) So, what exactly is ketosis? Ketosis (not to be confused with ketoacidosis in diabetic patients), occurs during a state of prolonged carbohydrate deficit, where the liver converts fatty acids into ketone bodies (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone). Normally, ketone concentration in the blood is very low and is primarily regulated by insulin and glucagon (4). It may reach high levels during periods of accelerated fatty acid oxidation combined with low carbohydrate intake or impaired carbohydrate use. Glucose is the preferred fuel source for various tissues in the body, including the brain. However, with very little glucose present and ketone body formation increased, most cells in the body can use Continue reading >>

Reverse Dieting: How To Build Muscle And Stay Lean

Reverse Dieting: How To Build Muscle And Stay Lean

You just did a physique show or completed a long diet. Now what? The urge is to immediately binge on all of the food you have been missing out on the last 3-5 months. Intuitively you know that is not the best way to go. What if there was another way? What if there was a way to eat post diet that will allow you to stay lean while gradually eating more food? The term reverse diet gets thrown around a lot in this industry but the actual practice of it tends to be misguided.If you are unfamiliar with the terminology, reverse dieting relates to the transition period into a caloric maintenance or surplus following a prolonged caloric restriction. Basically its just the opposite of a diet, hence reverse diet. The goal is to gradually re-introduce calories (carbohydrates and fat) typically in an incremental pattern that can span across a few months. By gradually increasing calories you are able to minimize fat re-gain and rebuild ones metabolic capacity. This all sounds great, but, like most things in order to see the benefit you must know how to do it right. Let’s start by breaking down how to implement a reverse diet. Night of Show or Last Day of the Diet: Ok this is a freebee…sort of. You can consume anything you want – eat, drink and enjoy yourself. Relax and try not to think about calories, macros or My Fitness Pal. This is a much needed mental break from the constant strain of dieting. The goal is to have a plan. Do not binge! Eat/drink until you feel full and satisfied. However, as a word of caution your body is in a very delicate state. As far as your body is concerned it just went through a mild form of starvation the past few months. Your metabolic rate is as low as it will ever be, and the re-introduction of calories in excess will have every opportunity to be Continue reading >>

Training On A Ketogenic Diet: Can You Build Muscle Without Carbs?

Training On A Ketogenic Diet: Can You Build Muscle Without Carbs?

If you’re like me and have done even a casual search for information about ketogenic diets before, you have probably come across an assortment of information that seems biased, inconclusive, contradictory, promotes myths or debunks them, is semi-authoritative, and mildly useful or just downright misleading. I think I pretty much just summed up most results for just about any search done on the Internet. It can be frustrating clicking and scrolling up and down tons of information for answers that you feel should be straightforward and consistent across all channels if based on any truth. For example, have you heard that ketogenic diets promulgate poisons in the body? Due to the controversiality of ketones, there may be some ambiguity about whether ketogenic diets can successfully help with the building of muscle without the high consumptions of carbohydrates. Before we delve into the topic, I want to clarify a thing or two about ketosis to make sure you and I are on the same page as far as fundamentals of ketosis. Just about anyone who abruptly switches from an everyday diet that is high in carbs to one that is low-carb experiences a state of ketosis. It is a healthy and natural physiological state that presents itself in the form of elevated ketones in the blood. Video source: Ketogenic Supplements The three ketone body substances resulting from fat metabolism are acetone, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic. Don’t panic! I know acetones are a common household solvent and an active ingredient in many nail polish removers, but the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry confirms that naturally higher-than-average amounts of acetones in the body “usually don’t cause health problems.” Acetones are helpful in the breaking down of fat in the body. Ad Continue reading >>

Can You Gain Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Gain Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Listen in to Ketotalk Podcast #19 where we talk about inflammatory foods, building muscle with a ketogenic diet & how ketosis affects the Baby Boomer Generation. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona Osteopath and Board Certified Obesity Medicine physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam answer more engaging questions about nutritional ketosis from you the listeners. Continue reading >>

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

“” —Passmore & Swindells, two British dietitians writing in the British Journal of Nutrition in 1963 Whether you agree with the above quote or think it’s hilarious nonsense, there’s no doubt that reduced carb diets are useful for losing body fat. A lot of people find that cutting carbs in favor of a higher protein, higher fat diet is the simplest way to get lean fast. However, people often make mistakes when going low-carb, especially if they are training hard in an effort to accelerate the fat loss process. With these 10 simple tips, you can make going low-carb a lot easier and get better fat loss results. Mistake #1: Not Restricting Carbohydrates Enough Low-carb, high-protein diets are effective for fat loss. This is a scientific fact. But, low-carb is a vague term. Simply cutting the average American man’s carb intake of 310 grams a day in half could be considered low-carb, but if you are overweight and your goal is fat loss, you most likely need to go a lot lower than 155 grams. A review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the 50 to 150 g/day range is too high for losing body fat in overweight, sedentary populations. A useful definition of a low-carb fat loss diet is less than 50 grams of carbs a day, which will lead to the production of ketones. When the body is producing ketones it is no longer relying on glucose (sugar from carbs) for its fuel source, which is a state that provides significant metabolic benefits and easier fat loss. Fix It: For best results, get those 50 grams of carbs from vegetables and select fruits, such as berries, or other low-carb fruit. Eliminate all grains—whole and processed. Mistake #2: You are Lean, Active & Restricting Carbs Too Much The AJCN definition of a low-carb diet as less than 50 grams a day w Continue reading >>

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past year or so, then you’ve most likely heard of the ketogenic (or keto) diet. If you have been living under one, I’m going to need you to crawl out from under it and take a seat because Ketogenic Dieting 101 is about to begin. So, Like, What Is It? Keto is a diet with high fats, moderate protein, and restricted carbohydrates. Initially designed to help children with epilepsy, it’s garnered attention for its effectiveness in regards to fat loss. The traditional ketogenic diet (also known as the therapeutic ketogenic diet), mimics the effects of starvation by forcing the body to burn its own fat stores rather than glucose. When you restrict carbohydrates, the body enters into a metabolic state known as ketosis, where the liver converts stored fat (triglycerides) into ketones. These ketones are what the body uses to fuel your brain, organs, and muscles. On the therapeutic ketogenic diet, the macro breakdown looks like this: However, as the ketogenic diet’s grown in popularity, especially among people who are looking to lose fat and build muscle, a new form of the diet’s emerged. While the traditional ketogenic diet is an extremely high-fat diet with sufficient protein intake, the physique ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet but with adequate protein intake. Huh, Sufficient and Adequate Protein Intake? This is where a lot of the confusion arises around the ketogenic diet, and it’s important to understand the difference. When the goal is fat loss, the concomitant goal is to preserve muscle mass. On a therapeutic ketogenic diet, protein is set to around 10-15% of total calorie intake. This is the sufficient amount of protein required to keep the body functioning and you healthy – basically so you don’t die. The Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator

Keto Calculator

You will see that a lot of websites pretending the be the masters of the Ketogenic Diet that are trying to tell you that there is an EXACT amount of fat, proteins and carbohydrates that you need to take or your off! This is simply not true, what really matters is the ratio of Ketogenic to Anti-Ketogenic food that you ingest. That is why we had an engineer working on this calculator to make it fully customizable !! The Right Macros I know the ketogenic diet can be quite complex to follow at first if you don't know anything about calories. I created this calculator to help you figure out how many grams of each macro-nutrient you need everyday. The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet typically works out to about 70-75% of calories from fat, 20-25% from protein, and 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis. How To Use This Calculator 1. First you'll need to know how many calories you need daily. To figure this out, just use our Daily Calorie Intake Calculator bellow and follow the instructions. It will give you the amount of calories needed to maintain your weight, to lose 1 or 2 pounds per week or to gain 1 or 2 pounds per week. Continue reading >>

Ask Dr. O: Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For Me?

Ask Dr. O: Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For Me?

Question: I’m interested in building muscle in the gym. Is a ketogenic diet right for me? Answer: A true ketogenic diet is based on a strict macro breakdown of 75% fats, 20% protein and 5% carbs. By replacing your normal energy source, carbs, with fat, you train your body to burn ketones for fuel instead of glucose. This process is known as ketosis. If your goal is extreme weight loss, this diet has proven successful for many people. However, if your goal is to lose weight while maintaining muscle mass, you might want to consider an alternative. One of the down sides of a keto diet is the potential for muscle loss. In a caloric deficit, your body searches for the fuel it is being deprived of. While we’d all love for it to immediately turn to our fat stores, in reality, the body will actually start to break down muscle tissue. This is a reality on any diet, however the moderate protein intake required by the strict macro breakdown of the ketogenic diet creates an even more catabolic environment. Supplementing with amino acids can help. By providing an alternative energy source for your body, aminos can prevent muscle loss and therefore, protect your metabolic engine. The more muscle you have, the more calories you’re able to burn. This is the whole point of Keto Aminos™. This supplement not only helps you burn fat, it helps you build muscle at the same time. Contrary to popular belief, amino acids are not an enemy of keto dieters. Yes, on a ketogenic diet, anything that you consume other than fats can and will be converted into glucose. This includes protein and amino acids. However, let’s take a step back and remember the goal of the keto diet. It is not to be in ketosis just for the sake of being in ketosis. The goal of the keto diet, or any diet for that mat Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Muscle Building

Ketogenic Muscle Building

Do you feel incredibly sleepy and lethargic whenever you eat carbohydrate rich foods? Yes, then this Ketogenic Bodybuilding Diet will be ideal for you. You may be among the individuals out there who simply don’t tolerate carbohydrates in their diet. To help you achieve you goals you would have to follow a lower carb diet plan, which would help you feel better. The drawback? It can be harder to build muscle mass while using a very low carbohydrate diet because of the fact you aren’t providing your body with the fuel energy it needs to perform each and every muscular contraction. Well, I am going to show you exactly how to overcome this with this ketogenic Bodybuilding diet plan.​ You will however need to make some adjustments. this targeted ketogenic diet plan tends to work very well for those who are intolerant to carbs but do want to sustain intense workouts and build lean muscle. You’ll eat a very low carbohydrate diet all throughout the week and then right before and after the workout program, carbohydrates will be added which will help to fuel the body and resaturate muscle glycogen stores. The end result? You build muscle and feel great as you do. Let’s show you how to set up a targeted ketogenic diet so that you can start supporting your intense gym training with proper nutrition. Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet

Few topics in bodybuilding seem as divisive as the keto diet. Some love being in ketosis and believe ketones to be a superior fuel source to glucose while others claim that following a keto diet is unnecessarily restrictive and even dangerous. The truth is that the ketogenic diet is perfectly safe for almost everyone and even has therapeutic uses. It is very effective at treating epilepsy after medicine has failed and has been shown to help mitigate the symptoms of dementia caused by alzheimer’s disease. There is even evidence that when combined with a relatively high caloric restriction, a ketogenic diet can shrink tumors and may possibly kill off cancer cells. But what about ketosis for the average healthy individual? Is the ketogenic diet appropriate for a bodybuilding lifestyle, in particular for gaining muscle? First lets delve into what ketosis really means and the variations of the ketogenic diet. Take a peek at the ketogenic food period. Ketosis is the process your body goes through when glycogen stores are depleted and you are not consuming carbohydrates to replenish them. Typically, after a few days of being in this glycogen-depleted state your body will get the picture that no more glucose is coming so it better find a new fuel source. This is when the liver begins to produce ketone bodies from fatty acids which will enter the bloodstream and be used much the same way glucose would be. Once carbohydrates are reintroduced into the diet and glucose enters the bloodstream the body will stop producing ketones and resort to using the glucose for energy once again. There are a few different approaches to take when it comes to ketogenic diets. Standard Ketogenic Diet SKD is the traditional low-carb ketogenic diet. You consume high amounts of fats, moderate amounts Continue reading >>

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