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Can Uti Cause Ketones In Urine?

Blood In Urine And Ketones?

Blood In Urine And Ketones?

jay711 wrote: I'm starting a new job soon, but before I'm given an official offer I have to be tested for alcohol and drug abuse. I had the test yesterday, which involved a urine test. My urine was very yellow, and the doctor asked if I had been drinking enough water as it usually means a person is dehydrated. Then the doctor put a strip in my sample. She said the strip indicated that my urine seems to have blood in it and ketones (not sure of the correct spelling). She said ketones are usually present in diabetics... but if I was diabetic then the strip would have shown glucose aswell as ketones, but as there was no glucose it's unlikely to be diabetes. She also said ketones are common in people who are hungry for a long period of time.... my diet has been very poor lately due to work pressure and I'm only having 2 meals a day. The thing that concerns me is the blood in the urine. The blood wasn't visible to the naked eye. She said sometimes it can be discolouration due to something you've eaten like beetroot, but I haven't eaten any beetroot lately, althought I did have tomatoe ketchup on my fries just before the test, could this be one of the causes? I forgot to mention it to her at the time as I wasn't thinking straight and was in a bit of a panic. She said it could be a local infection, but I don't experience any discomfort or pain when urinating and everything seems to be ok. Anyone else ever experienced something similar or know what the cause may be?? First, and don't take this the wrong way, it kind of bothers me when people leave the doctor's office and still have huge questions. Is it that the doctor didn't seem approachable? Is it that you feel uncomfortable asking questions of the doc while at the office? Or is it that the questions didn't pop up until afte Continue reading >>

The Principle Of The Urinalysis Test

The Principle Of The Urinalysis Test

URS-K • URS-3 • URS-10SG • URS-UTIProfessional Urinalysis Reagent Test Strips Professional urine reagent test strips for the rapid determination of Ketones (URS-K), Glucose, Protein and pH (URI-3) plus Leukocytes, Nitrites, Ketones, Bilirubin, Blood, Urobilinogen, and Specific Gravity (URI-10) levels in urine. The URS-UTI is a single use test specific for detection of urinary tract infections. These are the diagnostic reagent strips used by physicians, clinics and hospitals to initially screen for suspected and/or existing health conditions. Simple to use, urine diagnostic reagent strips can provide early indications of developing health problems and identify potential abnormal functions requiring more extensive testing. Additionally, routine use is frequently recommended by physicians for monitoring certain existing and chronic health conditions. THE PRINCIPLE OF THE URINALYSIS TEST These urinalysis test strips, URS-K (Ketones) URS-3 (Glucose, Protein, pH) and URS-10 (Glucose, Protein pH, Leukocytes, Nitrites, Ketones, Bilirubin, Blood, Urobilinogen, and Specific Gravity) and URS-UTI (leukocytes and Nitrite) are simple, easy to use reagent strips for the detection of key diagnostic chemical markers in human urine. They are the same urinalysis test strips used routinely by doctors, laboratories and healthcare professionals in preliminary diagnosis of, and initial screening for potential health problems. URS-Strips are plastic strips to which chemically specific reagent pads are affixed. The reagent pads react with the sample urine to provide a standardized visible color reaction within 30 seconds to one minute depending on the specific panel screen. The color is then visually compared to the included color chart to determine the level of each chemical factor. Test Continue reading >>

I Have A Pretty Serious Uti And I Went Back…

I Have A Pretty Serious Uti And I Went Back…

A: A urinary tract infection causes a significant amount of irritation in the bladder and can cause the urine dipstick to show protein, red blood cells and white blood cells. These abnormal results are usually transient, meaning they will go away once the infection is treated. Ketones are not commonly associated with a urinary tract infection, but can be present in the urine during times of illness if you don’t eat enough. It might be that you were not eating as much as usual and for this reason you had ketones in your urine. There is no need to worry currently about these abnormalities, but it is a good idea to get your urine rechecked once the infection is gone. The two tests we recommend to make sure your kidneys are in good health are a microalbumin test (urine) and a blood creatinine test. The microalbumin test checks for microscopic amounts of protein in the urine and is the most sensitive test we have to detect early kidney damage. A result above 30 is considered abnormal and should be rechecked. For those who have type 2 diabetes, their urine should be checked for microalbumin yearly to rule out early kidney disease. The blood creatinine test also should be done yearly and is used to calculate your “glomerular filtration rate,” which tells how well your kidneys are filtering your blood. It’s important to know the results of both your microalbumin and your blood creatinine tests. Talk to your doctor to see if you have had either of these tests and, if so, what the results showed. Continue reading >>

10 Things Your Pee Can Tell You About Your Body: Taking A Deep Dive Into Urinalysis, Dehydration, Ketosis, Ph & More!

10 Things Your Pee Can Tell You About Your Body: Taking A Deep Dive Into Urinalysis, Dehydration, Ketosis, Ph & More!

See, for the past several days, I’ve been randomly grabbing drinking glasses from the shelf in the kitchen… …and peeing into them. And yes, I realize that now you will likely never want to join me at my home for a dinner party. So why the heck am I urinating into our family’s kitchenware? It’s all about better living through science and figuring out ways to live longer and feel better (at least that’s what I tell my wife to appease her). It’s also about my sheer curiosity and desire to delve into an N=1 experiment in self-quantification with urinalysis. It’s also because I’ve been too lazy to order one of those special urinalysis specimen cups with the cute plastic lid. And let’s face it: with my relatively frequent use of a three day gut testing panel, my wife is already somewhat accustomed to giant Fed-Ex bags full of poop tubes sitting in the fridge, so urine can’t be all that bad, right? Anyways, in this article, you’re going to learn exactly why I think it’s a good idea to occasionally study one’s own urine, and you’ll also discover 10 very interesting things your pee can tell you about your body. Enjoy, and as usual, leave your questions, thoughts, feedback, and stories of your own adventures in urinalysis below this post. ———————– The History Of My Interest In Urinalysis Two years ago, I first became interested in urinalysis when I discovered a new start-up called “uChek”. The premise of uChek was quite simple. People with diabetes who want to check the amount of glucose in their urine would simply be able to download uChek to their iPhone or iPad. Then, after a “mid-stream collection,” (yes, that’s exactly what it sounds like and, in my experience, despite my Private Gym training, can be quite difficult to Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

What Is Urinalysis?

What Is Urinalysis?

Urinalysis is a series of tests on your pee. Doctors use it to check for signs of common conditions or diseases. Other names for it are urine test, urine analysis and UA. You may have a urinalysis as part of a routine check of your overall health, for instance as part of an annual physical. Urinalysis is one way to find certain illnesses in their earlier stages. They include: Your doctor may also want to test your pee if you’re getting ready to have surgery or are about to be admitted to the hospital. Urinalysis can be part of a pregnancy checkup, too. If you have symptoms of a kidney or urinary tract problem, you may have the tests to help find out what the problem is. Those symptoms include: Pain in your belly Pain in your back Pain when you pee or needing to go frequently You might also have this test regularly if you have a condition such as a kidney disease that needs to be watched over time. There are three different ways to analyze urine, and your test might use all of them. One is a visual exam, which checks the color and clarity. If your pee has blood in it, it might be red or dark brown. Foam can be a sign of kidney disease, while cloudy urine may mean you have an infection. A microscopic exam checks for things too small to be seen otherwise. Some of the things that shouldn’t be in your urine that a microscope can find include: Red blood cells White blood cells Bacteria Crystals (clumps of minerals – a possible sign of kidney stones) The third part of urinalysis is the dipstick test, which uses a thin plastic strip treated with chemicals. It’s dipped into your urine, and the chemicals on the stick react and change color if levels are above normal. Things the dipstick test can check for include: Acidity, or pH. If the acid is above normal, you could hav Continue reading >>

Urinalysis

Urinalysis

On This Page: What is Urine? Blood passes through the kidneys, and next urine is formed and excreted. Urine is made up of substances that are not used or needed by our cells, so they are the leftovers of metabolic processes (e.g., urea). The blood is first filtered and all small molecules, including both nutrients and wastes, enter a nephron. There are about 1,000,000 nephrons in each human kidney and nephrons are the active part of the kidney that produces urine while removing waste and excess substances from the blood. The nutrient molecules and some salts and water are reabsorbed back into the blood, while unwanted substances remain within the nephron to become a part of the urine. Urinalysis A urinalysis is, as the name suggests, is an analysis of the urine. A sample of 30-60mls of your urine is needed for urinalysis. Your GP may order urinalysis in a lab to test for kidney, metabolic disorders and urinary tract infections. If you are menstruating, close to your period or are taking any diuretics, it is best to tell your GP as they may wish to postpone obtaining a sample. It is also best to avoid strenuous exercise or eating any foods that could colour your urine before the test - e.g. beetroots, blackberries or rhubarb. Urinalysis may be needed for a number of reasons, for example: If you are experiencing pain in your lower abdomen or back, blood in the urine (either visible or found on a urine dipstick test), if you are experiencing pain when urinating or an increase in frequency of urination Routine medical examinations such as yearly check-ups, admission to hospital, screening for diabetes, kidney disease, hypertension, liver disease To evaluate new pregnancy To monitor progression and response to treatment of diseases such as diabetes, kidney impairment/disease Continue reading >>

Protein In Urine: 4 Causes & Other Pregnancy-related Urinary Issues

Protein In Urine: 4 Causes & Other Pregnancy-related Urinary Issues

After a routine pregnancy check-up, your doctor tells you there’s protein in your urine. Your first instinct may be to panic, but there are many possible reasons why protein is showing up in your urine – and not all of them are dangerous. 4 Causes for Protein in Urine During Pregnancy It’s not uncommon to find small amounts of protein in your urine during pregnancy. But in some cases, protein is a sign of complications that require swift treatment. 1. Your Kidneys are Working Overtime Protein may just be an indication that your kidneys are working overtime now that you’re pregnant. If only small amounts of protein are found in your urine, this is the likely cause. And it’s no wonder your kidneys are tired – you’re running to the bathroom every five minutes. Frequent urination during pregnancy puts excess strain on your kidneys and may contribute to the protein found in your urine. 2. You May Have an Infection Protein may also be a sign of a minor infection. If your doctor or midwife suspects that an infection is the cause, a sample of your urine will be sent to the hospital to check for a UTI (urinary tract infection). If you do have a UTI, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics to clear the infection. Most rounds of antibiotics last three to seven days. Don’t worry – urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. But your doctor will monitor your condition closely to make sure the infection clears. During pregnancy, hormones change the urinary tract, which makes you more vulnerable to infection. Your growing uterus also puts more pressure on your bladder, which makes it difficult to empty it completely. Stagnant urine in the bladder is the most likely cause of the infection. If left untreated, a simple UTI can lead to a kidney infection. A Continue reading >>

Clinlab Navigator Information

Clinlab Navigator Information

Urinalysis begins with a macroscopic examination of the urine which describes the color and clarity of the urine. In healthy individuals urine color ranges from pale yellow to amber, depending on their state of hydration. Many factors affect urine color including fluid balance, diet, medications and disease. The following table includes a list of the most common causes of abnormal urine coloration. Color Pathologic Causes Food & Drug Causes Cloudy white Phosphorus, pyuria, chyluria, lipiduria, hyperoxaluria, uricosuria Diet high in purine-rich foods causing uricosuria, propofol, hypercalciuria, phosphaturia Brown Bile pigments, myoglobin, hemolytic anemia, porphyria Fava beans, rhubarb, Levodopa, metronidazole (Flagyl), nitrofurantoin, anti-malarial drugs, acetaminophen overdose Brownish-Black Bile pigments, melanin, methemoglobin, alcaptonuria, porphyria levodopa, methyldopa, Senna, Cascara, iron, methocarbamol, metronidazole, nitrofurantoin, sorbitol Green or Blue Pseudomonas UTI, biliverdin, Hartnup disease, herbicide poisoning Amitriptyline, indigo, carmine, IV cimetidine (Tagamet), IV promethazine (Phenergan), methylene blue, triamterene (Dyrenium), indomethacin, methocarbamol, metoclopramide, propofol, Zaleplon Orange Bile pigments, urinary tract infection Phenothiazines, phenazopyridine (Pyridium), isoniazid, sulfasalazine, riboflavin Red Hematuria, hemoglobinuria, myoglobinuria, porphyria Beets, blackberries, rhubarb, Phenolphthalein, phenoazopyridine, rifampin, chloroquine, deferoxamine, hydroxycobalamin, warfarin Yellow Concentrated urine Carrots, Cascara Purple Urine bag syndrome due to gram negative bacteruria Aycock RD and Kass DA, Abnormal Urine Color. Southern Med J. 2012;105:43-37. Dipstick Testing Urine samples are initially screened with dipsticks. Per Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Every time I go into ketosis for more than I a week or two, my bladder gets irritated and I experience UTI-like symptoms. The last time I experienced this in ketosis, I ended up doing a round of antibiotics (big mistake), seeing a urologist, and getting my kidneys checked via ultrasound. The antibiotics didn't cure the discomfort, the urologist couldn't even find bacteria in my urine, and my kidneys checked out fine. The only thing that finally helped was when I discontinued my all meat and fat diet and took a month off from tea. I suspect that my bladder is just getting irritated by the ketones. Has anyone else experienced this? Any idea how to treat this? Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketone, Anyway?

What Is A Ketone, Anyway?

Ketones A ketone is byproduct of an alternative source of fuel for the body. Ketones are created as a result of fat breakdown and are the end-product of fat metabolism in the body. Relative to diabetes, ketones are formed when the body is starving. The body struggles to find an alternative food source and ketones are formed. Ketones can also form as a result of extremely high or “out of control” sugars. Ketones can overpower the body, rise in the blood, and prove to be a nuisance or go on to become a life-threatening problem, known as DKA. Staying in a tight range for blood sugar numbers and defining what’s “acceptable” for your loved one with their providers is key. Ketone Complications Ketones at a lower level can cause less life-threatening, but still significantly worrisome complications. These complications include risks for Urinary Tract Infection or UTI, Weight Loss and Failure to Thrive, Malnutrition, and Ketone presence on an ongoing basis can show the fact that sugars are often falling out of the ideal range. Testing for Ketones: Elevated Blood Sugar – If blood sugars are more than 240mg/dL, it is recommended to check for ketones. Ketones can be tested in a simple urine test strip. Use our Provider Locator Search Bar to help find a provider who specializes in Diabetes in your area. These providers can help define parameters for testing for ketones, controlling blood sugar, and more! Sickness – When Diabetic patients are ill, with a cold or flu or other viral illness, or have prolonged periods of not eating, urine should be checked every 4-6 hours for ketone bodies. Positive urine dip for ketones should always generate a call to the provider managing the diabetes. Patients with Type 1 Diabetes need to test more regularly and frequently for urinary Continue reading >>

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis is testing of the urine. A urine sample is usually collected using the clean-catch method or another sterile method. For example, a method to obtain an uncontaminated urine sample involves passing a catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urine cultures, in which bacteria from a urine sample are grown in a laboratory, are done to diagnose a urinary tract infection. Cultures are not part of routine urinalysis. The sample of urine must be obtained by the clean-catch method (see Obtaining a Clean-Catch Urine Sample) or by briefly inserting a sterile catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urinalysis can be used to detect and measure the level of various substances in the urine, including protein, glucose (sugar), ketones, blood, and other substances. These tests use a thin strip of plastic (dipstick) impregnated with chemicals that react with substances in the urine and quickly change color. Sometimes the test results are confirmed with more sophisticated and accurate laboratory analysis of the urine. The urine may be examined under a microscope to check for the presence of red and white blood cells, crystals, and casts (impressions of the kidney tubules created when urinary cells, protein, or both precipitate out in the tubules and are passed in the urine). Protein in the urine (proteinuria) can usually be detected by dipstick when present in large amounts. Protein may appear constantly or only intermittently in the urine, depending on the cause. Proteinuria may occur normally after strenuous exercise, such as marathon running, but is usually a sign of a kidney disorder. Small amounts of protein in the urine may be an early sign of kidney damage due to diabetes. Such small amounts may not be detected by dipstick. In these cases, urine will need to Continue reading >>

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones may not be on your mind when beginning a weight-loss diet, but if you plan to follow a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet plan, they should be. While many popular low-carb commercial diet plans encourage your body to shift into a fat-burning state called ketosis, the production of ketones that results can alter your urine chemistry and raise the risk of kidney stones. Understanding the risks to your kidneys can help you decide whether the weight loss promises of a high-protein, low-carb diet are worth it. Video of the Day Kidney stones develop when a hard mass of crystals develops in the urinary tract. Kidney stones are often extremely painful, especially when they pass through the thin ureter to exit the body. There are a few different types of kidney stones, each made up of different materials. The cause of kidney stones remains unknown, but some people seem to be more prone to developing them than others, so there may be a hereditary component. Ketones are compounds formed by the breakdown of fat as the body shifts from burning carbohydrates to burning fat for fuel. During a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, ketones become the main source of energy in the body. After a few days or weeks on this type of diet, the brain begins to use ketones as fuel instead of glucose. However, when too many ketones build up in the bloodstream, the pH of the urine changes from neutral to slightly acidic, which can put stress on the kidneys and potentially raise the risk of developing kidney stones. A 2002 study published in the "American Journal of Kidney Diseases" found that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet raised the acidity of the blood over a six-week period, a condition known to contribute to kidney stones. The study found up to a 90-percent increase in acid Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

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