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Can Uti Cause Ketones In Urine?

I Have A Pretty Serious Uti And I Went Back…

I Have A Pretty Serious Uti And I Went Back…

A: A urinary tract infection causes a significant amount of irritation in the bladder and can cause the urine dipstick to show protein, red blood cells and white blood cells. These abnormal results are usually transient, meaning they will go away once the infection is treated. Ketones are not commonly associated with a urinary tract infection, but can be present in the urine during times of illness if you don’t eat enough. It might be that you were not eating as much as usual and for this reason you had ketones in your urine. There is no need to worry currently about these abnormalities, but it is a good idea to get your urine rechecked once the infection is gone. The two tests we recommend to make sure your kidneys are in good health are a microalbumin test (urine) and a blood creatinine test. The microalbumin test checks for microscopic amounts of protein in the urine and is the most sensitive test we have to detect early kidney damage. A result above 30 is considered abnormal and should be rechecked. For those who have type 2 diabetes, their urine should be checked for microalbumin yearly to rule out early kidney disease. The blood creatinine test also should be done yearly and is used to calculate your “glomerular filtration rate,” which tells how well your kidneys are filtering your blood. It’s important to know the results of both your microalbumin and your blood creatinine tests. Talk to your doctor to see if you have had either of these tests and, if so, what the results showed. Continue reading >>

Urinalysis

Urinalysis

Print Overview A urinalysis is a test of your urine. A urinalysis is used to detect and manage a wide range of disorders, such as urinary tract infections, kidney disease and diabetes. A urinalysis involves checking the appearance, concentration and content of urine. Abnormal urinalysis results may point to a disease or illness. For example, a urinary tract infection can make urine look cloudy instead of clear. Increased levels of protein in urine can be a sign of kidney disease. Unusual urinalysis results often require more testing to uncover the source of the problem. Why it's done A urinalysis is a common test that's done for several reasons: To check your overall health. Your doctor may recommend a urinalysis as part of a routine medical exam, pregnancy checkup, pre-surgery preparation, or on hospital admission to screen for a variety of disorders, such as diabetes, kidney disease and liver disease. To diagnose a medical condition. Your doctor may suggest a urinalysis if you're experiencing abdominal pain, back pain, frequent or painful urination, blood in your urine, or other urinary problems. A urinalysis may help diagnose the cause of these symptoms. To monitor a medical condition. If you've been diagnosed with a medical condition, such as kidney disease or a urinary tract disease, your doctor may recommend a urinalysis on a regular basis to monitor your condition and treatment. Other tests, such as pregnancy testing and drug screenings, also may rely on a urine sample, but these tests look for substances that aren't included in a typical urinalysis. For example, pregnancy testing measures a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Drug screenings detect specific drugs or their metabolic products, depending on the purpose of the testing. How you prepare Continue reading >>

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine as a Diagnostic Tool A long time ago, disgusting as it may be, people used to actually taste and drink urine in order to try and diagnose a patient's disease! I'm not even kidding you. Thankfully, modern-day doctors do not have to resort to such disgusting and even dangerous methods. One of the reasons the doctor barbers of yesteryear used to drink their patient's urine was to see if it had a sweet taste, often indicative of diabetes mellitus. Finding the sweet-tasting glucose in the urine was covered in detail in another lesson, so we'll focus on other important measurements here instead. Interpreting Urine pH One value that can be measured in the urine is known as urine pH. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. If the pH is low, then it is acidic. If the pH is high, then it is basic, or alkaline. To remember which is which, I'll give you a little trick that has worked for me. If you grew up watching cartoons, you probably saw some comical ones where cartoonish robbers poured acid on the roof of a bank vault and waited while the acid ate its way downward into the vault, so the robbers could get down there to steal all the cash. If you can recall that acid likes to eat its way downward into things, then you'll remember that acidic substances go down the pH scale. That is to say, their pH numbers are lower than basic substances. Normal urine pH is roughly 4.6-8, with an average of 6. Urine pH can increase, meaning it will become more basic, or alkaline, due to: A urinary tract infection Kidney failure The administration of certain drugs such as sodium bicarbonate Vegetarian diets On the flip side, causes for a decreased, or acidic, urine pH, include: Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, a complication of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that grows within the urinary tract - anywhere from the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and through to the urethra. Urinary tract infections can be a particular problem for people with diabetes as sugar in the urine makes for a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. This is supported by data from the American Diabetes Association (a report at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the ADA), which showed 9.4% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes had a UTI compared to only 5.7% of people without diabetes. [92] What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Urinary tract infections are characterised by two types: Lower urinary tract infections or Cystitis - bacterial infection affecting the bladder and the tube that transports urine from your bladder out of your body via the penis or vagina (urethra) Upper urinary tract infections or Pyelonephritis - bacterial infection affecting the kidneys and the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) Lower urinary tract infection (affecting the bladder and urethra): Pain or stinging when passing urine (dysuria) Persistent feeling of the need to urinate Cloudy and foul-smelling urine Strong and bad smell of urine Abdominal pan (stomach pain) Back pain Blood in the urine (hematuria) Upper urinary tract infection (affecting the kidneys and ureters): High temperature / fever Constant shivering Vomiting Back pain Pain in your side (flank pain) How serious are urinary tract infections? Some people may find themselves particularly prone to UTIs. Upper urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis) are the more serious of the two. In this case the bacteria have managed to reach the tubes connecting the bladder (ureters) to the kidneys. If the bacterial infection reaches the kidney Continue reading >>

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis is testing of the urine. A urine sample is usually collected using the clean-catch method or another sterile method. For example, a method to obtain an uncontaminated urine sample involves passing a catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urine cultures, in which bacteria from a urine sample are grown in a laboratory, are done to diagnose a urinary tract infection. Cultures are not part of routine urinalysis. The sample of urine must be obtained by the clean-catch method (see Obtaining a Clean-Catch Urine Sample) or by briefly inserting a sterile catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urinalysis can be used to detect and measure the level of various substances in the urine, including protein, glucose (sugar), ketones, blood, and other substances. These tests use a thin strip of plastic (dipstick) impregnated with chemicals that react with substances in the urine and quickly change color. Sometimes the test results are confirmed with more sophisticated and accurate laboratory analysis of the urine. The urine may be examined under a microscope to check for the presence of red and white blood cells, crystals, and casts (impressions of the kidney tubules created when urinary cells, protein, or both precipitate out in the tubules and are passed in the urine). Protein in the urine (proteinuria) can usually be detected by dipstick when present in large amounts. Protein may appear constantly or only intermittently in the urine, depending on the cause. Proteinuria may occur normally after strenuous exercise, such as marathon running, but is usually a sign of a kidney disorder. Small amounts of protein in the urine may be an early sign of kidney damage due to diabetes. Such small amounts may not be detected by dipstick. In these cases, urine will need to Continue reading >>

Urinalysis

Urinalysis

On This Page: What is Urine? Blood passes through the kidneys, and next urine is formed and excreted. Urine is made up of substances that are not used or needed by our cells, so they are the leftovers of metabolic processes (e.g., urea). The blood is first filtered and all small molecules, including both nutrients and wastes, enter a nephron. There are about 1,000,000 nephrons in each human kidney and nephrons are the active part of the kidney that produces urine while removing waste and excess substances from the blood. The nutrient molecules and some salts and water are reabsorbed back into the blood, while unwanted substances remain within the nephron to become a part of the urine. Urinalysis A urinalysis is, as the name suggests, is an analysis of the urine. A sample of 30-60mls of your urine is needed for urinalysis. Your GP may order urinalysis in a lab to test for kidney, metabolic disorders and urinary tract infections. If you are menstruating, close to your period or are taking any diuretics, it is best to tell your GP as they may wish to postpone obtaining a sample. It is also best to avoid strenuous exercise or eating any foods that could colour your urine before the test - e.g. beetroots, blackberries or rhubarb. Urinalysis may be needed for a number of reasons, for example: If you are experiencing pain in your lower abdomen or back, blood in the urine (either visible or found on a urine dipstick test), if you are experiencing pain when urinating or an increase in frequency of urination Routine medical examinations such as yearly check-ups, admission to hospital, screening for diabetes, kidney disease, hypertension, liver disease To evaluate new pregnancy To monitor progression and response to treatment of diseases such as diabetes, kidney impairment/disease Continue reading >>

Cloudy Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Cloudy Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Having cloudy urine is not unusual and, in many cases, it is no reason for alarm. However, it just might be a sign of an underlying health condition. Healthy urine is clear and light yellow in color. Unhealthy urine can be cloudy, hazy, or milky looking. This can occur for a number of different reasons, including sexually transmitted diseases, dehydration, infections, or diseases that affect other body systems along with the urinary tract. While cloudy urine in men does happen, women get it more often since their bodies lend itself to E. coli forming in the bladder. In the majority of situations, cloudy urine is a sign of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Urinary tract infections are the second most common type of infection people get. Over eight million visits to healthcare providers each year are due to UTIs. Cloudy urine with odor is possible. This can be alarming and can happen in all age groups. Many people experience cloudy urine with no pain, while others feel a burning sensation when they urinate. All of the symptoms you might experience along with the cloudy, hazy appearance of urine should be described in detail to a physician for proper diagnosis and treatment. In this article: Cloudy urine causes and symptoms Symptoms vary depending on the cloudy urine causes. Signs of a problem can originate in the urinary tract, the reproductive system, the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, as well as other organs. Since urinary tract infections are so common, here we list some possible symptoms: Abdominal pain Bladder spasm Abnormal urine color, such as dark, pink, or bloody. Foul-smelling urine Frequent urination or decrease in urination Urgent need to urinate Here are some symptoms that could indicate something other than a UTI is the problem. Excessive hunger Continue reading >>

What Is Urinalysis?

What Is Urinalysis?

Urinalysis is a series of tests on your pee. Doctors use it to check for signs of common conditions or diseases. Other names for it are urine test, urine analysis and UA. You may have a urinalysis as part of a routine check of your overall health, for instance as part of an annual physical. Urinalysis is one way to find certain illnesses in their earlier stages. They include: Your doctor may also want to test your pee if you’re getting ready to have surgery or are about to be admitted to the hospital. Urinalysis can be part of a pregnancy checkup, too. If you have symptoms of a kidney or urinary tract problem, you may have the tests to help find out what the problem is. Those symptoms include: Pain in your belly Pain in your back Pain when you pee or needing to go frequently You might also have this test regularly if you have a condition such as a kidney disease that needs to be watched over time. There are three different ways to analyze urine, and your test might use all of them. One is a visual exam, which checks the color and clarity. If your pee has blood in it, it might be red or dark brown. Foam can be a sign of kidney disease, while cloudy urine may mean you have an infection. A microscopic exam checks for things too small to be seen otherwise. Some of the things that shouldn’t be in your urine that a microscope can find include: Red blood cells White blood cells Bacteria Crystals (clumps of minerals – a possible sign of kidney stones) The third part of urinalysis is the dipstick test, which uses a thin plastic strip treated with chemicals. It’s dipped into your urine, and the chemicals on the stick react and change color if levels are above normal. Things the dipstick test can check for include: Acidity, or pH. If the acid is above normal, you could hav Continue reading >>

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

A A A Urine Test Test Overview A urine test checks different components of urine, a waste product made by the kidneys. A regular urine test may be done to help find the cause of symptoms. The test can give information about your health and problems you may have. The kidneys take out waste material, minerals, fluids, and other substances from the blood to be passed in the urine. Urine has hundreds of different body wastes. What you eat and drink, how much you exercise, and how well your kidneys work can affect what is in your urine. More than 100 different tests can be done on urine. A regular urinalysis often includes the following tests: Color. Many things affect urine color, including fluid balance, diet, medicines, and diseases. How dark or light the color is tells you how much water is in it. Vitamin B supplements can turn urine bright yellow. Some medicines, blackberries, beets, rhubarb, or blood in the urine can turn urine red-brown. Clarity. Urine is normally clear. Bacteria, blood, sperm, crystals, or mucus can make urine look cloudy. Odor. Urine does not smell very strong, but it has a slightly "nutty" odor. Some diseases cause a change in the odor of urine. For example, an infection with E. coli bacteria can cause a bad odor, while diabetes or starvation can cause a sweet, fruity odor. Specific gravity. This checks the amount of substances in the urine. It also shows how well the kidneys balance the amount of water in urine. The higher the specific gravity, the more solid material is in the urine. When you drink a lot of fluid, your kidneys make urine with a high amount of water in it, which has a low specific gravity. When you do not drink fluids, your kidneys make urine with a small amount of water in it, which has a high specific gravity. pH. The pH is Continue reading >>

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones may not be on your mind when beginning a weight-loss diet, but if you plan to follow a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet plan, they should be. While many popular low-carb commercial diet plans encourage your body to shift into a fat-burning state called ketosis, the production of ketones that results can alter your urine chemistry and raise the risk of kidney stones. Understanding the risks to your kidneys can help you decide whether the weight loss promises of a high-protein, low-carb diet are worth it. Video of the Day Kidney stones develop when a hard mass of crystals develops in the urinary tract. Kidney stones are often extremely painful, especially when they pass through the thin ureter to exit the body. There are a few different types of kidney stones, each made up of different materials. The cause of kidney stones remains unknown, but some people seem to be more prone to developing them than others, so there may be a hereditary component. Ketones are compounds formed by the breakdown of fat as the body shifts from burning carbohydrates to burning fat for fuel. During a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, ketones become the main source of energy in the body. After a few days or weeks on this type of diet, the brain begins to use ketones as fuel instead of glucose. However, when too many ketones build up in the bloodstream, the pH of the urine changes from neutral to slightly acidic, which can put stress on the kidneys and potentially raise the risk of developing kidney stones. A 2002 study published in the "American Journal of Kidney Diseases" found that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet raised the acidity of the blood over a six-week period, a condition known to contribute to kidney stones. The study found up to a 90-percent increase in acid Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketone, Anyway?

What Is A Ketone, Anyway?

Ketones A ketone is byproduct of an alternative source of fuel for the body. Ketones are created as a result of fat breakdown and are the end-product of fat metabolism in the body. Relative to diabetes, ketones are formed when the body is starving. The body struggles to find an alternative food source and ketones are formed. Ketones can also form as a result of extremely high or “out of control” sugars. Ketones can overpower the body, rise in the blood, and prove to be a nuisance or go on to become a life-threatening problem, known as DKA. Staying in a tight range for blood sugar numbers and defining what’s “acceptable” for your loved one with their providers is key. Ketone Complications Ketones at a lower level can cause less life-threatening, but still significantly worrisome complications. These complications include risks for Urinary Tract Infection or UTI, Weight Loss and Failure to Thrive, Malnutrition, and Ketone presence on an ongoing basis can show the fact that sugars are often falling out of the ideal range. Testing for Ketones: Elevated Blood Sugar – If blood sugars are more than 240mg/dL, it is recommended to check for ketones. Ketones can be tested in a simple urine test strip. Use our Provider Locator Search Bar to help find a provider who specializes in Diabetes in your area. These providers can help define parameters for testing for ketones, controlling blood sugar, and more! Sickness – When Diabetic patients are ill, with a cold or flu or other viral illness, or have prolonged periods of not eating, urine should be checked every 4-6 hours for ketone bodies. Positive urine dip for ketones should always generate a call to the provider managing the diabetes. Patients with Type 1 Diabetes need to test more regularly and frequently for urinary Continue reading >>

Clinlab Navigator Information

Clinlab Navigator Information

Urinalysis begins with a macroscopic examination of the urine which describes the color and clarity of the urine. In healthy individuals urine color ranges from pale yellow to amber, depending on their state of hydration. Many factors affect urine color including fluid balance, diet, medications and disease. The following table includes a list of the most common causes of abnormal urine coloration. Color Pathologic Causes Food & Drug Causes Cloudy white Phosphorus, pyuria, chyluria, lipiduria, hyperoxaluria, uricosuria Diet high in purine-rich foods causing uricosuria, propofol, hypercalciuria, phosphaturia Brown Bile pigments, myoglobin, hemolytic anemia, porphyria Fava beans, rhubarb, Levodopa, metronidazole (Flagyl), nitrofurantoin, anti-malarial drugs, acetaminophen overdose Brownish-Black Bile pigments, melanin, methemoglobin, alcaptonuria, porphyria levodopa, methyldopa, Senna, Cascara, iron, methocarbamol, metronidazole, nitrofurantoin, sorbitol Green or Blue Pseudomonas UTI, biliverdin, Hartnup disease, herbicide poisoning Amitriptyline, indigo, carmine, IV cimetidine (Tagamet), IV promethazine (Phenergan), methylene blue, triamterene (Dyrenium), indomethacin, methocarbamol, metoclopramide, propofol, Zaleplon Orange Bile pigments, urinary tract infection Phenothiazines, phenazopyridine (Pyridium), isoniazid, sulfasalazine, riboflavin Red Hematuria, hemoglobinuria, myoglobinuria, porphyria Beets, blackberries, rhubarb, Phenolphthalein, phenoazopyridine, rifampin, chloroquine, deferoxamine, hydroxycobalamin, warfarin Yellow Concentrated urine Carrots, Cascara Purple Urine bag syndrome due to gram negative bacteruria Aycock RD and Kass DA, Abnormal Urine Color. Southern Med J. 2012;105:43-37. Dipstick Testing Urine samples are initially screened with dipsticks. Per Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

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