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Can Too Much Protein Stop Ketosis?

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

You heard it right, too much protein is bad for ketosis. The most common description of the ketogenic diet is that it’s a very low-carb, high fat (LCHF) diet. But the amount of protein you consume is every bit as important as carbohydrates and fat. Protein is an essential part of nutrition for maintaining lean mass and healthy cells, but the right amount is significant on a ketogenic diet. When beginning and maintaining an LCHF keto diet, you should calculate and track your protein consumption. Treat protein just like other macros (carbs and fat), if you want to get into ketosis and stay there. You’re not alone – too much protein on a Ketogenic Diet is a common mistake Many of the people we talk to that are complaining about not being able to achieve ketosis make the mistake of not factoring in the amount of protein they’re consuming. Their protein intake is far too high, and that’s bad for several reasons that we’ll touch on further. Protein intake on a ketogenic diet ought to be moderate and not excessive. We know that 75 percent of your keto diet should come from healthy, non-processed, fats but so many people miss factoring protein into that equation. “Low-Carb, High-Fat. NOT Low-Carb, High-Protein”. We’ve all seen people in their active wear chowing down on plain Lean Chicken Breast and Broccoli. Don’t do that! The important thing is that unlike many modern low carb diets in which protein dominates, on a ketogenic diet fat should be the dominating macro nutrient. Specifically, protein should be around 20% of your macros. Just enough to maintain lean mass and prevent cell degeneration. Not so much that it turns into your bodies primary fuel source via a process called gluconeogenesis. What is Gluconeogenesis? Gluconeogenesis is the process in you Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

This Is What Happens To Your Body If You Eat Too Much Protein

This Is What Happens To Your Body If You Eat Too Much Protein

Protein is a very important part of any diet. Our hair and nails depend on it to keep them in tip top condition (priorities), and we also rely on the food group to maintain the health of our bones, muscles, our skin and our blood. But as with anything - especially the good things in life, ffs - there is such a thing as too much protein. In a world full of Instagram fitspo accounts, more and more people have found themselves on the health and fitness hype, which often involves a high protein diet of lean meats and protein shakes. And this is all well and good, explains Dr Seth Rankin, founder of London Doctors Clinic, because protein can be an effective way to lose weight - but only if it's balanced properly. "Protein does help suppress the appetite. It is patently obvious that 165 calories worth of chicken (a full breast) will fill you up much more than 165 calories of bread (a single slice of toast lightly buttered). For this reason, high protein/low carbohydrate diets do certainly help weight loss," explained the doctor. But what happens when you have too high a protein intake? "If we were to solely rely on protein in our diets, this could become damaging to our bodies," said Dr Rankin, adding: "We need to eat a balanced diet to enable our bodies to function properly." So here, according to a doctor, are some of the physiological consequences of consuming too much protein: 1. Dehydration "Dehydration can occur as you lose water weight when you replace your carbohydrates with protein," explains Dr Rankin. "By not replacing your empty carbohydrate stores, the water you have lost is not replaced and this can lead to dehydration." 2. Ketosis Ketosis, the doctor explains, "is a normal metabolic process [which occurs] when a lack of carbohydrates in your diet can mean your Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

When embarking on a ketogenic diet for health or fat loss, finding the optimum protein intake can be very confusing for many beginners. For smooth adaptation in the transition to a ketogenic metabolism I typically guide people using a caloric spread of around 70-80% fat, 15-25% protein, and 5% carbohydrate from green fibrous vegetables – but this ratio varies for every individual and using percentages is confusing and misleading in many cases. The best way to look at macronutrients is not in percentage ratios, but in grams. The slew of bloggers and gurus spouting so much conflicting information leads many into a mental stalemate about how much protein they should be eating. This article lays out the metrics I most commonly use to quantify how much protein an individual should intake – there is no magic ratio and the needs, preferences, and goals of the individual determine the amount of protein they will likely require on their ketogenic diet which usually lies within a relatively broad range of 1-2.2g/kg (and in some cases even higher *cringe say the protein-phobic) of bodyweight or .5-1g/lb of lean body mass (Lean Body Mass equals Body Weight minus Body Fat). Myth: “Too much” protein turns immediately into sugar I almost always recommend people increase their intake of fish and seafoods in order to get the vital nutrient DHA into their central nervous system and mitochondrial membranes. We see amazing results when people opt for more fish and less red meat, which I also love, but land mammals are not nearly as nutrient dense as seafoods with their incredible levels of DHA, EPA, selenium, and iodine. Sometimes this means they will be eating more protein than they believe will allow them to be “ketogenic”, this protein-phobia can be counterproductive, which Continue reading >>

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

A ketogenic diet requires that a person eat a high fat diet while keeping carbohydrates to a minimum. The third macronutrient category, protein, is an interesting one and often creates heaps of discussion. Carbohydrates and fat are primary energy sources for the body. Protein, on the other hand, is a source of essential amino acids which are the building blocks for the body. However, the amount of protein needed by each person varies greatly based upon a number of factors, including activity level, lean mass, sex, and personal preference to name a few. One question I am often asked is, “can you eat too much protein on a ketogenic diet?” Protein is a very satiating food, and usually the more protein a person eats, the less hungry the person is. One trick people use is to eat a diet high in protein (150 grams + per day) while limiting carbs and fat. This strategy is often wildly successful for fat loss, but it can create other problems to eat so much protein while limiting carb and fat calories so dramatically. I do not advocate eating a high protein/low carb/low fat diet, especially for women. But I do believe wholeheartedly that it is important to eat enough protein. This is even more critical on a ketogenic diet, where carbs are so limited. Under eating protein can cause the body to lose muscle. Some argue for limiting protein because 1) doing so leads to higher ketone levels and 2) they believe that eating too much protein can lead the body to create new glucose from protein (gluconeogenesis) and keep a person from transitioning effectively to fat burning. My friend Mike Berta explains the fallacies of this thinking so well that I am sharing his post rather than recreating my own. Mike can be contacted directly at [email protected] His Facebook group is cal Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

Having been a low-carb enthusiast and team Diet Doctor member for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis ages ago. I haven’t. In the last post, Why You’re Not in Ketosis, I revealed why, and how I fixed it (by reducing my carb and protein intake to 20 and 60 grams per day respectively). But, I had a problem. Though it felt awesome to be back in ketosis, it sucked to eat so little protein – 60 grams a day isn’t much for a meat lover like me. Could I eat more protein AND remain in optimal ketosis? I was going to find out. The protein experiment I designed the following experiment: First, I would increase my protein intake from 60 grams a day to the level where I would no longer be in optimal ketosis. Then, I would reduce my protein intake until I was back in optimal ketosis, using what I ate on the last day to define my daily-protein limit. Finally, I’d eat to this daily-protein limit every day for a week to test its accuracy, adjusting my protein intake if necessary. To increase the trustworthiness of the experiment, I added five rules: 1. Keep eating 10-20 grams of carbs a day 2. Keep eating during a four-hour window (5-9pm) 3. Adjust my protein intake gradually 4. Make no other major changes to my life 5. Measure my blood-ketone levels every morning before eating “Nice plan”, I thought. But there was one thing I hadn’t taken into account… Preparation To start off the experiment, I measured my blood-ketone levels: 2.0 mmol/L. Not exactly shocking news – I had been eating 45-60 grams of protein and 10-20 grams of carbs a day for weeks, being in optimal ketosis almost every morning. But all that could end soon – it was protein time. Day 1: Taco-cheese shells On the first day of the experiment, I ate similarly to how I’d eaten lately – Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

A common question for people either starting or following a low-carb eating plan is how much protein should I eat on a ketogenic diet? An important distinction to make with the Ketogenic Diet is that it’s a high-fat, low-carb and moderate protein diet. There is a common misconception that low-carb, high-fat diets (LCHF) mean eating astonishing amounts of protein. This idea comes from the original Atkins Diet1 which allowed unlimited protein in the initial stages. (Current Atkins diets include a more modified protein approach). The Ketogenic Diet, however, aims for 20% protein or less (by calorie) which is in the range of 90-150g per day. The suggested amount of protein by keto researcher and expert Dom D’Agostino (Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida) is 1-1.5 g of protein per kg of body weight per day to stay in ketosis. If you are highly active (particularly if you do resistance training) then your protein intake should be at the high-end of the range. Why Does Eating Too Much Protein Lead To The Keto Diet Not Working? When you eat too much protein, it gets converted by the body into glucose. This process has a fancy name called gluconeogenesis. So just while you are trying to keep carbs/sugars to a minimum, eating excess protein creates more! The liver transforms excess protein into glucose and as a result, you feel hungry. This can prevent you from getting into ketosis and burning fat. One option is to eat higher fat cuts of meat and less lean meat like chicken breast and turkey. If you keep your portion size small, this will increase your fat intake while keeping protein low. Alternatively, eat less protein overall and ensure you are getting plenty of fat from non-meat sources like avo Continue reading >>

Can Too Much Protein Stall Your Results?

Can Too Much Protein Stall Your Results?

It’s true that eating protein may boost metabolism and help you to feel fuller but this doesn’t mean that Atkins is the protein ‘free for all’ that many believe it to be and excessive amounts of steak, cheese, eggs and other foods shouldn’t be over-eaten, and this is for a valid reason. If you consume too much protein then this can be converted into glucose by a process called ‘gluconeogenesis’. The conversion of protein to glucose occurs as a result of the hormone, glucagon, which prevents low blood sugar and so isn’t a bad thing unless you are OVER-consuming protein. You see, when you reduce carbs, you go into ‘ketosis’ or fat burning and you produce ketones which are also used for energy. The small amount of glucose needed for brain function comes partly from the process of gluconeogenesis. This means you’ve no need for high amounts of carbs, above and beyond the ‘good’ carbs which you get from vegetables, pulses etc.; and this is for their nutritional factor as they are packed with fibre and other nutrients. When following Atkins, if you do overeat protein foods then you can stall the transition to ketosis; or even get knocked out of this fat burning state altogether. Don’t worry too much though as gluconeogenesis is a slow process and so you’ll not instantly stop burning fat if you eat a steak that’s too large, or you have an extra helping of bacon on your full English breakfast. However don’t eat large helpings of meat or eggs on a daily basis as this may set you back and stall weight loss. It’s also depends on you as a person as some people are more sensitive to protein and are best advised to err on the lower end of the scale when choosing meals. Others can eat more protein and needs will increase if you’re exercising too. S Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

What Is Gluconeogenesis?

What Is Gluconeogenesis?

Eat fat burn fat. Eat carbs burn carbs. It’s that simple, right? Yes and no. There’s more to it. Your body has many different metabolic pathways that it uses to provide energy for your cells. Glycolysis (using sugar for fuel) and lipolysis (using fat for fuel through beta-oxidation) are the most well-known metabolic pathways, but there are many more. One pathway, in particular, can turn the amino acids from protein into fuel. Why does it matter? Because this may be the one thing that is holding you back from getting into ketosis and losing fat while you are on a ketogenic diet. Gluconeogenesis — Your Liver’s “Magic Trick” If you are under some form stress or consume excess protein, your liver will perform a magic trick called gluconeogenesis. This literally translates to “the making of (genesis) new (neo) sugar (gluco)”. During gluconeogenesis, the liver (and occasionally the kidneys) turns non-sugar compounds like amino acids (the building blocks of protein), lactate, and glycerol into sugar that the body uses a fuel. When glycogen (your body’s sugar storage) is low, protein intake is high, or the body is under stress, amino acids from your meals and your muscle become one of your main energy sources. If your body continues to convert amino acids into fuel, it can keep you from getting into ketosis. This is why some ketogenic dieters may experience an increase in body fat percentage and a decrease in muscle mass during their first couple weeks on the ketogenic diet. But there is no need to worry. The ketogenic diet will still help reverse common health issues like diabetes and obesity and improve health in many ways. When you start the diet, however, gluconeogenesis will get in the way. One of the Problems With Going Ketogenic During the first three d Continue reading >>

Daily Protein Requirement

Daily Protein Requirement

Your daily protein requirement is affected by several factors: Activity level: the more active you are, the more protein you can eat. This is especially true of resistance type exercise such as weight lifting. Essential protein intake: Nine of the 20 required amino acids (the molecular building blocks which make up proteins) are essential, meaning the body cannot make them so they must be obtained from the food we eat. Your gender and basic build: In general, men need more protein than women, and more muscular people also require more protein to maintain lean body mass. The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein intake is set at .36 grams per pound of body weight each day. This figure represents the minimum intake needed to maintain health. The protein requirements for those who are looking to optimize health, who are sick, injured or on a very low carb diet may be different. It’s also important to know that a daily protein requirement should never be based on percentage of calories. A person's protein requirements are constant no matter how many calories he or she eats each day because the amount of protein needed is a function of a person’s lean body mass (LBM) or on total ideal body weight if LBM is not known. Calculating protein needs should be based on maintaining positive nitrogen balance. Amino acids contain nitrogen. The protein we eat gets metabolized into amino acids for use in building new muscle and other tissues. Excess nitrogen is excreted via the urine. When the amount of nitrogen excreted is less than the amount of nitrogen in the food we ate, we can say that we are in positive nitrogen balance and it means we took in enough protein to build new tissues. If we don’t eat enough protein, then we get into a negative nitrogen balance. W Continue reading >>

6 Signs You're Eating Way Too Much Protein

6 Signs You're Eating Way Too Much Protein

High-protein diets are all the rage right now. Protein does tons for your body, including helping to repair your muscles when they tear during exercise and supporting bone health and hormone production. What’s more, high-protein diets have been known to help women shed stubborn weight. “It’s a hot macronutrient because it really does help you feel more full, which is what makes high-protein diets pretty effective for weight loss. The way protein is metabolized even increases your metabolism a little bit when you eat it,” says nutritionist Christy Brisette, the founder and president of 80 Twenty Nutrition. But don’t get carried away: There may be health risks associated with having TOO much protein over a long period of time. Some research has shown that people on high-protein diets that are rich in red meats have higher levels of uric acid in their blood, which increases the risk of gout—a condition causing painful joint inflammation. A high-protein diet that’s also high in red meat has been linked to increased risk of colon cancer, according to the World Health Organization, as well as kidney disease, according to one large 2016 study. And Brisette says people on high-protein diets may be more likely to be deficient in calcium and vitamin D, which increases the risk of osteoporosis later in life. You need at least 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day, with very active people needing in the range of 1.2 to 1.8 grams per kilogram. At the very most, Brisette says, you should get two grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (that’s about 118 grams of protein for a 130-pound person). “If you get more, you don’t see benefits and there could be risks,” she says. Think your protein intake could be making you feel bad? Here are a fe Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

One of the biggest mistakes people make when first adopting a ketogenic diet for weight loss is eating too much protein. A successful ketogenic diet requires strictly limiting carbohydrate consumption and upping the intake of healthy fats. This allows the metabolism to switch from primarily using glucose (sugar) for fuel to primarily using ketones (fat) for fuel. This is referred to as ketosis. When the cells begin to burn fat for fuel this includes body fat such as the fat around the belly, thighs, and hips. So to get into ketosis and shed pounds of body fat, you must eat a ketogenic diet which is a low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diet. But what about protein? Does it matter how much you eat? And what kind of protein is best for maximum weight loss? Protein and Weight Loss A common misconception is that a ketogenic diet is high in protein. The reality, however, is that a ketogenic diet is a moderate protein diet, or maybe even more accurately, an adequate protein diet. In fact, too much protein can actually inhibit your body from entering ketosis thus preventing you from experiencing the myriad of benefits of the diet. There are many reasons why adequate protein consumption is required for success on a ketogenic diet.Studies have shown that protein is the most satiating macronutrient while carbohydrate is the least satiating. Therefore, if you eat an adequate amount of protein you will feel more satisfied and be more likely to eat less calories. Protein is also the most important macronutrient for building and maintaining muscle mass. Muscles burn calories 24/7 even when you are not exercising. Protein and Ketosis Proteins are the building blocks of life, they provide the body with all of the essential amino acids. But more is not always better. When first adopting a ketogeni Continue reading >>

Too Much Protein Harms A Ketogenic Diet

Too Much Protein Harms A Ketogenic Diet

Too much protein can get you out of Ketosis Protein can get converted to glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis. If you consume too many carbohydrates, your body will stop making ketones and if you consume too much protein, your body will also stop making ketones. Eating too much protein and not eating enough micronutrients are the most common mistakes with the ketogenic diet. More on this here. mTor and too much protein Eating too much protein activates the mtor pathway. mTor is a protein that serves as a nutrient signaling pathway that is the key muscle building mechanism in all mammals. If you active the mTor pathway, cells grow and reproduce quickly. This pathway also reduces cellular repair and regeneration. Because of this, we do not want to stimulate this pathway if we are concerned about longevity and preventing diseases such as cancer. When the mTor pathway is not turned on, your cells are repairing themselves and cleaning up damaged cells (called authophagy). This is a very important component of anti-aging. The Atkins and Paleo diets typically stimulate mTor because of the high levels of protein consumed. The Ketogenic diet is better for anti-aging because a lower amount of protein is consumed, which is important for not stimulating mTor. How to figure out how much protein to eat without stimulating mTor The maximum amount of protein you should eat per day is a calculation based on lean body mass. The formula is 1 gram of protein for each kilogram of Lean body mass. How to figure lean body mass Weight in kilograms x bodyfat % = lbs of fat Weight – lbs of fat = lean body mass Then convert lbs to kg by dividing by 2.2 Example: This person weighs 181 lbs and has 15% bodyfat 181 lbs x 15% (0.15) = 27 lbs of fat 181 lbs – 27 lbs of fat = 154 lbs of lean b Continue reading >>

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