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Can Pneumonia Cause Respiratory Acidosis?

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Introduction Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acidosis is alveolar hypoventilation. The expected physiologic response is an increased PHCO3. The increase in concentration of bicarbonate ions (HCO3) in plasma (PHCO3) is tiny in patients with acute respiratory acidosis, but is much larger in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation and is characterized by a low arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The expected physiologic response is a decrease in PHCO3. As in respiratory acidosis, this response is modest in patients with acute respiratory alkalosis and much larger in patients with chronic respiratory alkalosis. Although respiratory acid-base disorders are detected by measurement of PCO2 and pH in arterial blood and may reveal the presence of a serious underlying disease process that affected ventilation, it is important to recognize the effect of changes in capillary blood PCO2 in the different organs on the binding of H+ ions to intracellular proteins, which may change their charge, shape, and possibly their funct Continue reading >>

6.2 Respiratory Alkalosis - Causes

6.2 Respiratory Alkalosis - Causes

Hyperventilation is the mechanism in ALL cases Hyperventilation (ie increased alveolar ventilation) is the mechanism responsible for the lowered arterial pCO2 in ALL cases of respiratory alkalosis. This low arterial pCO2 will be sensed by the central and peripheral chemoreceptors and the hyperventilation will be inhibited unless the patients ventilation is controlled. 1. Central Causes (direct action via respiratory centre) Other 'supra-tentorial' causes (pain, fear, stress, voluntary) Various drugs (eg analeptics, propanidid, salicylate intoxication) Various endogenous compounds (eg progesterone during pregnancy, cytokines during sepsis, toxins in patients with chronic liver disease) 2. Hypoxaemia (act via peripheral chemoreceptors) Respiratory stimulation via peripheral chemoreceptors 3. Pulmonary Causes (act via intrapulmonary receptors) 4. Iatrogenic (act directly on ventilation) Can a decreased CO2 production cause respiratory alkalosis? Hyperventilation is the mechanism in all of the situations in the above list & indeed in all cases. Theoretically, a decreased carbon dioxide production could result in respiratory alkalosis if alveolar ventilation remained fixed. But this would not occur in a normal person because any drop in arterial pCO2 would reflexly cause a decreased ventilation (via chemoreceptor inhibitory input into the respiratory centre). About the only situation where maybe a decrease in CO2 production could be the mechanism of respiratory alkalosis would be in an intubated patient on fixed ventilation during Anaesthesia or in Intensive Care Unit and where the CO2 production was low due to hypothermia and decreased metabolic rate. However, even in such a circumstance, this mechanism is usually referred to as 'excessive controlled ventilation' (which it Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory acidosis develops when air exhaled out of the lungs does not adequately exchange the carbon dioxide formed in the body for the inhaled oxygen in air. There are many conditions or situations that may lead to this. One of the conditions that can reduce the ability to adequately exhale carbon dioxide (CO2) is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. CO2 that is not exhaled can shift the normal balance of acids and bases in the body toward acidic. The CO2 mixes with water in the body to form carbonic acid. With chronic respiratory acidosis, the body partially makes up for the retained CO2 and maintains acid-base balance near normal. The body's main response is an increase in excretion of carbonic acid and retention of bicarbonate base in the kidneys. Medical treatment for chronic respiratory acidosis is mainly treatment of the underlying illness which has hindered breathing. Treatment may also be applied to improve breathing directly. Respiratory acidosis can also be acute rather than chronic, developing suddenly from respiratory failure. Emergency medical treatment is required for acute respiratory acidosis to: Regain healthful respiration Restore acid-base balance Treat the causes of the respiratory failure Here are some key points about respiratory acidosis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Respiratory acidosis develops when decreased breathing fails to get rid of CO2 formed in the body adequately The pH of blood, as a measure of acid-base balance, is maintained near normal in chronic respiratory acidosis by compensating responses in the body mainly in the kidney Acute respiratory acidosis requires emergency treatment Tipping acid-base balance to acidosis When acid levels in the body are in balance with the base levels in t Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis , Metabolic Acidosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis .) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (ie, >45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (ie, pH < 7.35). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate levels (ie, >30 mEq/L). Acute respiratory acidosis is present when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may result from depression of the central respiratory center by one or another of the following: Central nervous system disease or drug-induced r Continue reading >>

Shared Flashcard Set

Shared Flashcard Set

Details Title Acid Base Balance Description Acid Base Balance Total Cards 214 Subject Nursing Level Undergraduate 2 Created 10/14/2012 Click here to study/print these flashcards. Create your own flash cards! Sign up here. Additional Nursing Flashcards Cards Term An opioid drug overdose would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Pulmonary Edema would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Chest trauma would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Neuromuscular disease would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term COPD would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Airway obstruction would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Pneumonia would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term TB would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Emphysema would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Asthma would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Cigarrette smoking would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term Pleural effusion would put a patient at most risk for what acid/base imbalance? Definition Respiratory Acidosis Term What is pleural effusion? Definition excess fluid that accumulates in the pleura, the fluid-filled space that surrounds the lungs Pleural effusion is excess fluid that accu Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis/ Alkalosis

Respiratory Acidosis/ Alkalosis

Don't miss your chance to win free admissions prep materials! Click here to see a list of raffles . So, I am reading up on acid-base disturbances, which have always given me a bit of trouble. I think I am understanding them a lot better now, but am still confused about how the different lung diseases in particular cause either resp. acidosis or alkalosis. Different resources say different things and the sources I've taken a look at don't really do a good job of explainingthe reason why a particular disease causes acidosis or alkalosis. Take for example, restrictive and obstructive lung diseases. I can understand that with an obstructive lung disease you have trouble getting air out of the lungs, so less CO2 is removed --> respiratory acidosis. But what about restrictive lung disease? Different books say different things - some say that they cause resp. acidosis, while others say they cause resp. alkalosis. Nobody seems to give a good explanation either way. I think I can reason out that restrictive lung disease, esp. interstitial lung disease, --> imparied diffusion of CO2 out of the lungs --> resp. acidosis). What about pulmonary edema and pneumonia? Some sources say resp acidosis and some say resp alkalosis? Finally, one of the major causes I've seen for resp. alkalosis is hypoxemia (due to stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors). However, it seems that most pulmonary causes of hypercapnia would also cause hypoxemia. So why wouldn't all pulmonary causes of hypercapnia cause a respiratory alkalosis? Finally, I've noticed that severe anemia is listed as a cause of respiratory alkalosis, but can't find the mechanism for this. Since anemia only decreases O2 content and doesn't affect the PaO2, I'm guessing it has nothing to do with peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

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Pneumonia Occurs In Both Respiratory Acidosis And Respiratory Alkalosis. Why?

Pneumonia Occurs In Both Respiratory Acidosis And Respiratory Alkalosis. Why?

Answered Aug 25, 2017 Author has 24.7k answers and 48.1m answer views Your observation should be: in pneumonia, one can have respiratory alkalosis, but also respiratory acidosis. Acidosis if the patient wasnt able to rid themselves of the CO2 because of the lung problem. Alkalosis if being very short of breath due to low O2 due to the pneumonia, thus blowing off CO2, low CO2 causes respiratory alkalosis. 540 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Answered Aug 25, 2017 Author has 2.9k answers and 740.5k answer views I'm not sure if you realize you have the implications backwards. Lung dysfunction that can occur with any pneumonia or, for that matter, any inflammatory process involving the lung can lead to hypoventilation which will lead to respiratory acidosis via retained carbon dioxide, or to hyperventilation (much less common and more common in asthma) which leads to respiratory alkalosis from blowing off too much carbon dioxide. 221 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Types, Causes, Symptoms, Treatment

Respiratory Acidosis: Types, Causes, Symptoms, Treatment

What is Respiratory Acidosis? Respiratory Acidosis which is also known by the names of Respiratory Failure or Ventilatory Failure is a pathological condition of the respiratory system in which the lungs of the body are not able to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body thus making the blood and other fluids in the body more acidic in nature. This is because the body must balance the ions that control pH. In majority of the cases, Respiratory Acidosis is caused due to an underlying condition. Under normal circumstances, the lungs take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. The oxygen is taken from the lungs to different parts of the body while the carbon dioxide is released from the lungs to the air. Sometimes what happens is that the lungs lose their capacity to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body and some amount of carbon dioxide still remains within the body, which increases the acidic content in the blood and other fluids in the body causing Respiratory Acidosis. Some of the underlying conditions like asthma, COPD, pneumonia and sleep apnea are the primary causes for development of Respiratory Acidosis. What are the Types of Respiratory Acidosis? Respiratory Acidosis is of two types, of which one is acute and the second is chronic. Acute Respiratory Acidosis: This occurs quickly and the symptoms caused by it are also quite severe. This is in fact a medical emergency and any individual who has acute Respiratory Acidosis needs to be treated emergently. Any delay in treatment or if left untreated may cause life-threatening complications. Chronic Respiratory Acidosis: This type of Respiratory Acidosis develops over time and is relatively asymptomatic. In fact, the body gets used to the increased acidic content, but chronic respiratory acidosis may become acute Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is a medical emergency in which decreased ventilation (hypoventilation) increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and decreases the blood's pH (a condition generally called acidosis). Carbon dioxide is produced continuously as the body's cells respire, and this CO2 will accumulate rapidly if the lungs do not adequately expel it through alveolar ventilation. Alveolar hypoventilation thus leads to an increased PaCO2 (a condition called hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2 in turn decreases the HCO3−/PaCO2 ratio and decreases pH. Terminology[edit] Acidosis refers to disorders that lower cell/tissue pH to < 7.35. Acidemia refers to an arterial pH < 7.36.[1] Types of respiratory acidosis[edit] Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (over 6.3 kPa or 45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (pH <7.36). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal blood pH (7.35 to 7.45) or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate (HCO3− >30 mm Hg). Causes[edit] Acute[edit] Acute respiratory acidosis occurs when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may be caused by depression of the central respiratory center by cerebral disease or drugs, inability to ventilate adequately due to neuromuscular disease (e.g., myasthenia gravis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, muscular dystrophy), or airway obstruction related to asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. Chronic[edit] Chronic respiratory acidosis may be secondary to many disorders, including COPD. Hypoventilation Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis Definition Respiratory acidosis is a condition in which a build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood produces a shift in the body's pH balance and causes the body's system to become more acidic. This condition is brought about by a problem either involving the lungs and respiratory system or signals from the brain that control breathing. Description Respiratory acidosis is an acid imbalance in the body caused by a problem related to breathing. In the lungs, oxygen from inhaled air is exchanged for carbon dioxide from the blood. This process takes place between the alveoli (tiny air pockets in the lungs) and the blood vessels that connect to them. When this exchange of oxygen for carbon dioxide is impaired, the excess carbon dioxide forms an acid in the blood. The condition can be acute with a sudden onset, or it can develop gradually as lung function deteriorates. Causes and symptoms Respiratory acidosis can be caused by diseases or conditions that affect the lungs themselves, such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, or severe pneumonia. Blockage of the airway due to swelling, a foreign object, or vomit can induce respiratory acidosis. Drugs like anesthetics, sedatives, and narcotics can interfere with breathing by depressing the respiratory center in the brain. Head injuries or brain tumors can also interfere with signals sent by the brain to the lungs. Such neuromuscular diseases as Guillain-Barré syndrome or myasthenia gravis can impair the muscles around the lungs making it more difficult to breathe. Conditions that cause chronic metabolic alkalosis can also trigger respiratory acidosis. The most notable symptom will be slowed or difficult breathing. Headache, drowsiness, restlessness, tremor, and confusion may also occur. A rapid heart rate Continue reading >>

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Acidosis is caused by an overproduction of acid in the blood or an excessive loss of bicarbonate from the blood (metabolic acidosis) or by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood that results from poor lung function or depressed breathing (respiratory acidosis). If an increase in acid overwhelms the body's acid-base control systems, the blood will become acidic. As blood pH drops (becomes more acidic), the parts of the brain that regulate breathing are stimulated to produce faster and deeper breathing (respiratory compensation). Breathing faster and deeper increases the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled. The kidneys also try to compensate by excreting more acid in the urine. However, both mechanisms can be overwhelmed if the body continues to produce too much acid, leading to severe acidosis and eventually heart problems and coma. The acidity or alkalinity of any solution, including blood, is indicated on the pH scale. Metabolic acidosis develops when the amount of acid in the body is increased through ingestion of a substance that is, or can be broken down (metabolized) to, an acid—such as wood alcohol (methanol), antifreeze (ethylene glycol), or large doses of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). Metabolic acidosis can also occur as a result of abnormal metabolism. The body produces excess acid in the advanced stages of shock and in poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (diabetic ketoacidosis). Even the production of normal amounts of acid may lead to acidosis when the kidneys are not functioning normally and are therefore not able to excrete sufficient amounts of acid in the urine. Major Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (buildup of ketoacids) Drugs and substances such as acetazolamide, alcohols, and aspirin Lactic acidosis (buildup of lactic acid Continue reading >>

Virtualmedstudent.com || Respiratory Acidosis

Virtualmedstudent.com || Respiratory Acidosis

A respiratory acidosis occurs when a person hypoventilates (ie: breathes too slow or too shallow). The result is an increase in PaCO2 (ie: the amount of CO2 dissolved in blood). The increase in plasma CO2 causes the blood to become acidic, which is manifest by a drop in the bodies' pH. The reason blood becomes more acidic under these conditions is based on Le Chatelier's principle. To understand this principle better let's look at the equation that governs CO2 and HCO3- formation: HCO3- + H+ <---> H2CO3 <---> CO2(g) + H2O You'll notice that CO2 (on the right most part of the equation) is what is exhaled via the lungs. When a patient is hypoventilating there is much more CO2 than normal in the blood stream. The body compensates by turning this CO2 into HCO3- and H+. The resulting increase in H+ (hydrogen ion) causes the acidosis (decrease in pH). So what could cause someone to hypoventilate? There are many causes! All of them relate to a decreased ability of the patient to breath at a rate sufficient to remove carbon dioxide from the blood stream. Medications that slow respiratory rate (ie: morphine and other pain medications) are notorious culprits. Poor pulmonary mechanics from obesity or neuromuscular disease (ie: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ) can also cause decreased respiratory rates. Lung and chest wall diseases are also common causes of respiratory acidosis and include pneumonia, pneumothorax, and decreased respiratory rate secondary to pain from rib fractures (contrast this from hyperventilating from other painful stimuli). When assessing someone who has a respiratory acidosis first ask the question: what is causing the patient to have a decreased respiratory rate? Look for signs of external chest wall trauma, pneumonia, etc. Scour through the medication recor Continue reading >>

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