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Can My Dog Survive Dka

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Canine Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Canine diabetic ketoacidosis, sometimes known as DKA, is a potentially fatal disease that most commonly occurs in dogs with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, although in rare cases it has been known to appear in nondiabetic dogs. This condition symptomatically resembles that of diabetes but usually goes unnoticed until a near-fatal situation is at hand. For this reason, it is important to understand the causes, symptoms and treatment options. How Canine Diabetic Ketoacidosis Develops Under normal conditions, the pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, which helps to regulate the level of glucose in the blood cells. When the pancreas is ineffectively able to create enough insulin, a dog becomes diabetic. By default, a dog's body will begin looking for alternative fuel sources, such as fat. The problem is that when too much fat is consumed by the body, the liver then begins to produce ketones. This excessive level of ketones causes the condition known as canine diabetic ketoacidosis. There are two scenarios in which this can occur: in dogs with poorly controlled diabetes and in dogs with undiagnosed diabetes. Recognizing the Symptoms Because of the potentially deadly side effect Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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For more information on this, visit the link below: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Warning Signs of Diabetes in Dogs 1. Weakness or Fatigue 2. Increased Thirst 3. Increased Urination 4. Increased Hunger 5. Sudden Weight Loss 6. Obesity 7. Thinning or Dull Hair 8. Cloudy Eyes 9. Vomiting http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-w... Nicolas, selected from petMD Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Is your dog consuming lots of water...more than you think is normal? Eating too much? Frequently urinating? He might have diabetes. Sugar diabetes, more specifically known as canine diabetes, is a common disease to dogs. It is a hormonal disorder that affects dogs of ages 5 to 9. Some species like German Shepherd, Poodles, Keeshonden and Golden Retrievers register the highest incidence of this disease. Obese dogs also stand a greater risk of being diabetic. The ratio of female to male infected with the disease is 3:1. This book addresses the most conspicuous symptoms of diabetes in dogs, the main causes, and how to effectively treat it.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Diabetic ketoacidosis in dogs, sometimes shortened to DKA, is a deadly medical emergency that happens when there is not enough insulin in the body to regulate levels of blood sugar known as glucose. It is a complication of diabetes mellitus that requires immediate medical treatment before it becomes fatal. When insulin levels drop, the body can’t use glucose properly, so glucose builds up in the blood while the liver produces ketone bodies to act as an emergency fuel source. When ketone bodies are broken down, they cause the body’s pH balance to shift and become more acidic. Dogs can’t maintain their fluid and electrolyte balance, which results in deadly symptoms. If your dog shows signs of diabetic ketoacidosis, especially if they have been diagnosed with diabetes, it is important that you see an emergency veterinarian right away for treatment. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for diabetic ketoacidosis in dogs. Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs Sometimes dogs that suffer from diabetic ketoacidosis only show mild symptoms, but the majority of affected animals get very sick within a week of the start of the illness. The symptoms o Continue reading >>

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  1. heatherny2

    My yorkipoo, Rusty, was just diagnosed today and not given a good prognosis. His glucose level was over 400 and ketones were present in his urine. The vet wanted to send him to a specialist to be watched over the weekend, but I can't afford that. We will administer insulin over the weekend, testing him every few hours, and see how he does. He has already developed the cataracts, but is eating and acting fine, so i just didn't have the heart to euthanize him today without giving him a chance over the weekend. My sons will just be devastated if he doesn't pull through.
    Anyone had any experience with this and if so, what was the outcome? Oh, and maybe some jingles will help.

  2. McVillesMom

    I worked with a number of DKA dogs when I was a tech in an emergency/referral hospital. Most of them were in the CCU, unfortunately, and some of them did survive, but it's usually very touch and go for a while. It sounds as though your guy is in better shape than most of my patients were - a lot of them were flat out, essentially comatose, so the fact that he is still eating and acting fine is a good sign. Hopefully, since you just found out, you will be able to get his glucose regulated and he'll do well - just keep a VERY close eye on him and do NOT hesitate to call or take him somewhere if you think he isn't right - they can crash very, very fast.

  3. heatherny2

    Thank you. Yeah, he is acting as normal as he always was, and eating really well (in fact he really likes the special food they gave us). He is also getting used to his glucose testing (with help from DH and a friend). We are, however, all watching him for any changes, so we can immediately get it addressed.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Ketoacidosis

Ketones in the urine, as detected by urine testing stix or a blood ketone testing meter[1], may indicate the beginning of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a dangerous and often quickly fatal condition caused by low insulin levels combined with certain other systemic stresses. DKA can be fixed if caught quickly. Diabetics of all species therefore need to be checked for ketones with urine testing stix, available at any pharmacy, whenever insulin level may be too low, and any of the following signs or triggers are present: Ketone Monitoring Needed: Little or no insulin in last 12 hours High blood sugar over 16 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL (though with low insulin, lower as well...) Dehydration (skin doesn't jump back after pulling a bit gums are tacky or dry)[2] Not eating for over 12 hours due to Inappetance or Fasting Vomiting Lethargy Infection or illness High stress levels Breath smells like acetone (nail-polish remover) or fruit. Note that the triggers and signs are somewhat interchangeable because ketoacidosis is, once begun, a set of vicious circles which will make itself worse. So dehydration, hyperglycemia, fasting, and presence of ketones are not only signs, they're also sometimes trigge Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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