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Can My Dog Survive Dka

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Snake Wine in Vietnam! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fy12D... Join the notification squad! Click the BELL icon to get updated as soon as a video is uploaded. New video every Wednesday! About This Episode: Today, I'm hunting down Vietnam's best street food on Ho Chi Minh's, chaotic Bi Vin (Biu Vien) street. I sample some snails (c), fried corn (Bp Xo), a coconut ice-cream confection (Kem Xi Da) and the Vietnamese classic, Banh Mi (Banh m). Though all this food was tasty, most all of it seemed a bit strange to me at first, but in the end I was glad I put it in my mouth. Fly to Vietnam RIGHT NOW to eat this stuff. About Sonny Side: Im not sponsored. Im not rich. Im just some guy who wanted to make the type of travel videos that I would want to see. This show is completely self-funded so thanks for patiently watching that five second advertisement (and read below how you can support this channel). I am a video director by trade. Each time I travel to a new country I bring a cameraman with me, usually a friend, to shoot as many episodes as possible in a short amount of time (usually a week). The rest of the time Im working as a video director/videographer in Vietnam and editing the c

What If I Do Nothing? - Vin

A month ago my sister wanted to know if her Jack Russell Terrier could be sick because he was drinking and peeing all the time. I told her he needed to go to the vet; he could have a simple urinary tract infection or he could have more going on. Inside my head, I was screaming “diabetes” as polyuria/polydipsia (drinks a lot and pees a lot), or PU/PD as medical types call it, is a hallmark for diabetes mellitus  in dogs, cats, and people. In dogs, diabetes mellitus rarely responds to dietary changes - unlike some people and some cats - and almost always requires twice daily insulin injections to control the disease. Having seen clients react to a diagnosis of diabetes, I wondered how my sister and her husband would react if they had to take care of this chronic condition that requires significant planning and scheduling. It’s not for every owner: while it’s not expensive, it requires insulin injections every 12 hours, 7 days a week for the rest of the pet’s life, with no time off for good behavior. It requires considerable commitment, which can be particularly difficult for people like my sister and her husband who work outside the home and can’t drop everything to giv Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

  4. -> Continue reading
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Outcome Of Dogs With Diabetic Ketoacidosis: 127 Dogs (1993-2003).

Abstract The aim of this study was to retrospectively describe the outcome of 127 dogs with naturally occurring diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and to examine the association between outcome of canine DKA and clinical and clinicopathologic findings. Eighty-two (65%) dogs were diagnosed with DKA at the time of initial diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Eighty-seven dogs (69%) had one or more concurrent disorders diagnosed at the time of hospitalization. Commonly identified concurrent conditions included acute pancreatitis (52, 41%), urinary tract infection (21, 20%), and hyperadrenocorticism (19, 15%). Dogs with coexisting hyperadrenocorticism were less likely to be discharged from the hospital (P = .029). Of 121 treated dogs, 89 dogs (70%) survived to be discharged from the hospital, with a median hospitalization of 6 days. Nonsurvivors had lower ionized calcium concentration (P < .001), lower hematocrit (P = .036), lower venous pH (P = .0058), and larger base deficit (P = .0066) than did survivors. Time from admission to initiation of subcutaneous insulin therapy was correlated with lower serum potassium concentration (P = .0056), lower serum phosphorus concentration (P = .0043), ab Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

  4. -> Continue reading
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For more information on this, visit the link below: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Warning Signs of Diabetes in Dogs 1. Weakness or Fatigue 2. Increased Thirst 3. Increased Urination 4. Increased Hunger 5. Sudden Weight Loss 6. Obesity 7. Thinning or Dull Hair 8. Cloudy Eyes 9. Vomiting http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-w... Nicolas, selected from petMD Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Is your dog consuming lots of water...more than you think is normal? Eating too much? Frequently urinating? He might have diabetes. Sugar diabetes, more specifically known as canine diabetes, is a common disease to dogs. It is a hormonal disorder that affects dogs of ages 5 to 9. Some species like German Shepherd, Poodles, Keeshonden and Golden Retrievers register the highest incidence of this disease. Obese dogs also stand a greater risk of being diabetic. The ratio of female to male infected with the disease is 3:1. This book addresses the most conspicuous symptoms of diabetes in dogs, the main causes, and how to effectively treat it.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats And Dogs

Over the last few days the signs have been getting worse. Your pet isn’t doing well; it is depressed, isn’t eating, and may even be vomiting. You thought it would get better, but it hasn’t and in fact your pet looks really sick. So you decide to take your pet into the veterinarian, who runs a bunch of tests. It is most likely that the animal will be whisked away to a treatment room after the veterinarian confirms a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. What is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)? You didn’t even know that your pet was diabetic, so how could it have this problem? Diabetic ketoacidosis most commonly develops in animals with undiagnosed diabetes. However, animals with diabetes can develop this problem as well, if their diabetes gets out of control. The reason that your pet will be quickly taken to the treatment room is because DKA is an emergency. These animals look sick because their whole body is being affected by the problem. If the situation is not addressed quickly, DKA can cause irreversible damage. This doesn’t mean that your pet will be fixed overnight. Even uncomplicated, mild cases of DKA often stay in the hospital for two or three days. Before we explain DK Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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