diabetestalk.net

Can Metformin Cause A Heart Attack?

Diabetes News: This Drug Could Reduce Risk Of Heart Attack In Type 1 Sufferers

Diabetes News: This Drug Could Reduce Risk Of Heart Attack In Type 1 Sufferers

Type 1 diabetes accounts for about ten per cent of adults with the condition, according to Diabetes UK. Unlike type 2 diabetes, people with type 1 tend to be born with the inability to produce insulin, meaning that glucose cannot be moved from the bloodstream into cells. It comes with a higher risk of heart disease. Indeed, heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems cause the death of three in four people with type 1 diabetes. The University of Glasgow has discovered that a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes may also help reduce heart problems in type 1 diabetes sufferers. This is compared to one in four of the overall population for the same issues. However, a cheap and versatile drug could reduce this risk. The University of Glasgow has discovered that a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes may also help reduce heart problems in type 1 diabetes sufferers. They discovered that the drug - metformin - has a positive effect on cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes. 10 foods to prevent heart disease Mon, August 15, 2016 Here are out top 10 foods to prevent heart disease. It’s already given to type 1 diabetes sufferers to reduce insulin requirement and stabilise weight. However, its effects on the heart and blood vessels has so far been unknown. Prof John Petrie, lead study author from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, said: “The results from this trial are significant because currently cardiovascular disease is a major cause of reduced life expectancy in type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease rates are more than double those of the background population. “Type 1 diabetes is not caused by lifestyle issues. Insulin therapy is required to control glucose and reduce complications but can cause weight gain Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Ten Myths About Metformin

Ten Myths About Metformin

Is metformin (Glucophage) bad for you? There is quite a bit of misinformation out there about this commonly used medication. Metformin therapy may cause diarrhea and lower vitamin B12 levels, but most things you hear about metformin aren’t true. Here are some common metformin myths. Metformin is bad for your kidneys. It’s not. What may be confusing folks here is that until 2016 patients with a creatinine level above 1.5 were advised not to take metformin. Metformin does not cause the kidney problems and in fact, 2016 labeling on Metformin was changed to indicate it should not be used only in those with late-stage chronic kidney disease stage IV or V. Metformin is bad for your liver. Truth is, it’s not. Metformin isn’t metabolized at all by the liver and instead is excreted unchanged in the urine. Metformin-induced liver injury is a rare, but possible adverse drug reaction that usually occurs at 4-8 weeks of therapy. Metformin is dangerous to take if you want to become pregnant. This is not true, and in fact may be the opposite. Metformin therapy during pregnancy in women with PCOS is associated with a reduction in miscarriage rate and gestational diabetes and did not adversely affect birth weight or development at 3 and 6 months of life. Metformin causes dementia. No. In fact a recent study of 17,000 diabetic vets found that taking metformin was associated with a lower risk of dementia than sulfonylureas like glyburide or glipizide. Other studies have shown metformin use to be associated with reduced rates of dementia and improved cognitive function. Metformin is bad for your heart. This is one I hear quite a bit from patients and it’s not true. Metformin has been suggested to exhibit cardioprotective effects in the setting of a heart attack. Metformin therapy Continue reading >>

Can A Common Diabetes Drug Help Heart Attack Recovery?

Can A Common Diabetes Drug Help Heart Attack Recovery?

Better understanding of drug’s mechanism of action can lead the way to new treatment options for heart disease in diabetes patients. Heart disease accounts for more than half of all fatalities in patients with diabetes. The diabetes drug metformin is used by patients with diabetes to help prevent heart disease; however, not all patients can take metformin. New research recently explored for the first time the mechanism by which metformin helps prevent heart disease. By better understanding the mechanism of action, the hope is that it will pave the way for new drugs. The researchers, from Newcastle University, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Saudi Arabia, constructed a model that allowed them to simulate a heart attack in the lab, using stem cells from cord blood and cells from umbilical. They found new blood vessel formation, which is essential for heart attack recovery, and established metformin enhances the physiological process through which new blood vessels form. Their finding is that during a heart attack in patients with diabetes, there is a lack of oxygen in the presence of high glucose levels, which delays blood vessel formation. Metformin seems to reverse that process, while also affecting multiple genes, which help to promote the growth of new blood vessels. Dr. Jolanta Weaver, Senior Lecturer in Diabetes Medicine at Newcastle University, who led the study, said: “The outcome of heart disease interventions in patients with diabetes is much worse in comparison with non-diabetic individuals. As a result, there is a demand for improved treatment approaches to enhance the outcomes of those with diabetes in order to increase heart attack survival rates. “Our research is exciting as it can instantly make a difference to the treatments we are exploring, offering a n Continue reading >>

Metformin For Protection Against Alzheimer's, Cancer And Heart Disease?

Metformin For Protection Against Alzheimer's, Cancer And Heart Disease?

With commentary by Nir Barzilai, MD, director of the Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Brian Kennedy, PhD, president and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. Metformin may influence fundamental aging factors that underlie many age-related conditions, including cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer's, says Nir Barzilai, MD, director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Bronx. "Metformin is generic, and it's cheap," Dr. Barzilai says. And accumulating data suggests that ''it interferes with the biology of aging." Aging, he says, is a primary risk factor for not only diabetes but also most of our big killers, such as Alzheimer's, heart disease and cancer. In animal and human studies, metformin has shown promise in slowing the aging process and halting diseases. To study the potential of metformin further, Dr. Barzilai plans to launch a large-scale study, Targeting Aging with METformin (TAME), to look at the effects of metformin compared to placebo. His team has already completed the MILES study, Metformin in Longevity, and are analyzing the results. In that study, they gave some participants metformin, at 1,700 milligrams a day, and others placebo. The aim was to see if the metformin could restore the gene expression profile of an older person with blood sugar problems known as impaired glucose tolerance (but not yet diabetic), to that of a younger person. Dr. Barzilai knows he has critics of his approach. He brushed them off, saying the people who don't see the value of the research ''don't understand the biology of aging and that it can be changed." He doesn't see the research as testing an anti-aging drug. "Aging is not a disease and we don't want it to be a disease," he says. Howe Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes Drugs Associated With Increased Risk Of Death

Common Diabetes Drugs Associated With Increased Risk Of Death

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Common diabetes drugs associated with increased risk of death Compared to another popular drug, three widely used diabetes medications are associated with a greater risk of death, a large new analysis finds. Compared to another popular drug, three widely used diabetes medications are associated with a greater risk of death, a large new analysis finds. The results were presented June 25 at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston. The drugs, glipizide, glyburide, and glimepiride, are known as sulfonylureas, which help decrease blood-sugar levels among type 2 diabetes patients by stimulating the pancreas to produce insulin. In the past, these medications were considered comparable to one another in terms of effectiveness and safety. Recently, however, research has shown some sulfonylureas may be safer than others. These findings led to this latest research, which compared them to another type of blood-sugar-reducing drug known as metformin. All four medications are available under low-cost, generic labels. "We have clearly demonstrated that metformin is associated with a substantial reduction in mortality risk, and, thus, should be the preferred first-line agent, if one has a choice between metformin and a sulfonylurea," said study lead author Kevin M. Pantalone, D.O., an endocrinologist at Summa Western Reserve Hospital in Cuyahoga Falls, OH, who conducted this study in conjunction with a team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH. In the United States, nearly 26 million people, or 8 percent of the population, have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many of these patients also have other underlying medical conditions, including Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects On The Heart

Metformin Side Effects On The Heart

Metformin, sold under the brand name Glucophage, is an anti-hyperglycemic medication used alone or in combination with other medication, such as insulin, to control blood glucose levels in those with Type 2 diabetes. It belongs in the biguanide class of medication. According to Drugs.com, metformin works by decreasing the amount of glucose obtained from food and glucose produced by the liver, lowering blood glucose levels. Video of the Day According to DiabetesNet.com, the chemical structure of metformin resembles that of the French lilac plant, which was used long ago to lower blood sugar but found to be too toxic. Metformin is shorter-acting than French lilac and can in rare cases produce the same toxic reaction, called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis--which can be fatal--is a condition in which there is too much lactate in the blood, which lowers the pH. It can occur when metformin levels build up and cannot be cleared from the body. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include slow heartbeat, or bradycardia, and low blood pressure, or hypoptension. Other symptoms include shallow breathing, diarrhea and extreme weakness and fatigue. Alcohol consumption and a reaction with the medication Tagamet can increase the chances for lactic acidosis to develop. Metformin should not be taken by those with congestive heart failure or heart disease. Chest pain is a rare but serious side effect of taking metformin, according to PubMed Health. Notify your physician immediately if you experience any chest pain while taking metformin. Metformin has been well studied in many clinical trials and found to be safe in most instances. The side effects reported by those taking metformin are compared against any side effects experienced by those taking a placebo. It has been determined that taking th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug, Metformin, Lowers Risk Of Heart Disease Deaths Better Than Sulfonylureas, New Analysis Shows

Diabetes Drug, Metformin, Lowers Risk Of Heart Disease Deaths Better Than Sulfonylureas, New Analysis Shows

Study confirms metformin should be first-line therapy for treatment of #diabetes.- Click to Tweet #Diabetes drug metformin found more effective at lowering risk of heart disease deaths than sulfonylureas.- Click to Tweet Metformin outperforms other #diabetes drugs; doesn’t cause weight gain like other drugs, study confirms. - Click to Tweet A new analysis of 204 studies involving more than 1.4 million people suggests that metformin, the most frequently prescribed stand-alone drug for type 2 diabetes, reduces the relative risk of a patient dying from heart disease by about 30 to 40 percent compared to its closest competitor drug, sulfonylurea. The study, designed to assess the comparative — not absolute or individual — benefits and risks of more than a dozen FDA-approved drugs for lowering blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, is described in the April 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. Diabetes now affects almost 10 percent of the U.S. population and poses a growing public health threat, and most people will eventually need drug treatment, the researchers say. “Metformin looks like a clear winner,” says Nisa Maruthur, M.D., M.H.S., assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “This is likely the biggest bit of evidence to guide treatment of type 2 diabetes for the next two to three years.” Maruthur, the lead author on the meta-analysis, notes that cardiovascular fatalities — heart attacks and strokes — are major risks for people with uncontrolled blood sugar, but it has never been clear if one diabetes drug is better than another at lowering these fatalities. Other diabetes-related complications include blindness, kidney failure and limb amputations. This review, Maruthur says, provides a much-needed update to Continue reading >>

Deterring Heart Disease If You Have Diabetes

Deterring Heart Disease If You Have Diabetes

Deterring heart disease if you have diabetes Lifestyle changes are vital, but new medications may help. a_namenko; Halfpoint | Thinkstock; zaretskaya | GettyImages Two of the most prevalent health problems in this country type 2 diabetes and heart disease are closely linked. People with diabetes are more than twice as likely to die from heart disease than those without diabetes. An array of overlapping risk factors (such as being overweight and having high blood pressure and cholesterol levels) probably explains part of this association. On the plus side, a diet that emphasizes vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats, coupled with regular moderate exercise (at least 30 minutes daily, most days of the week) can help people dodge the dangers associated with both heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Even so, most people with type 2 diabetes must also take the drug metformin (or other medications) to help reduce their high blood sugar levels, the hallmark of the disease. For those who take metformin but still struggle to keep their blood sugar under control, doctors typically prescribe an additional drug. Two newer drugs, empagliflozin (Jardiance) and liraglutide (Victoza), have been shown to lower the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease and reduce blood sugar levels in high-risk diabetes patients. "These are promising drugs that may be good choices for people with diabetes at high risk of heart disease," says Dr. Joanna Mitri, a physician at Harvard-affiliated Joslin Diabetes Center. However, the new drugs are very expensive, costing hundreds of dollars per month, she notes. A number of older, less expensive generic drugs are still viable options to help people manage their diabetes. In addition, it's not known whether the new drugs offer heart Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin, Heart Failure, And Lactic Acidosis: Is Metformin Absolutely Contraindicated?

Metformin, Heart Failure, And Lactic Acidosis: Is Metformin Absolutely Contraindicated?

Many patients with type 2 diabetes are denied treatment with metformin because of “contraindications” such as cardiac failure, which may not be absolute contraindications Summary points Treatment with metformin is not associated with an increased risk of lactic acidosis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have no cardiac, renal, or liver failure Despite increasing disregard of contraindications to metformin by physicians, the incidence of lactic acidosis has not increased, so metformin may be safe even in patients with “contraindications” The vast majority of case reports relating metformin to lactic acidosis report at least one other disease/illness that could result in lactic acidosis Use of metformin in patients with heart failure might be associated with lower mortality and morbidity, with no increase in hospital admissions and no documented increased risk of lactic acidosis Further studies are needed to assess the risk of lactic acidosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and traditional contraindications to metformin Metformin first became available in the United Kingdom in 1957 but was first prescribed in the United States only in 1995.w1 The mechanism of action has been extensively reviewed.w2 w3 The UK prospective diabetes study showed that metformin was associated with a lower mortality from cardiovascular disease than sulphonylureas or insulin in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.1 It was also associated with reduced all cause mortality, which was not seen in patients with equally well controlled blood glucose treated with sulphonylureas or insulin.1 Despite the evidence base for the benefits of metformin, concerns remain about its side effects and especially the perceived risk of lactic acidosis in the presence of renal, hepatic Continue reading >>

The Best (and Worst) Diabetes Drugs—for Your Heart

The Best (and Worst) Diabetes Drugs—for Your Heart

Heart disease is the number-one killer of people with type 2 diabetes, so you would think drugs that help control diabetes would be good for the heart. But the opposite is sometimes true—some commonly prescribed diabetes drugs actually increase your risk for heart disease. There are many ways this can happen, explains Debabrata Mukherjee, MD, chief of cardiovascular medicine at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso. “Sometimes they can cause hypoglycemia—low blood sugar—which can reduce the amount of nutrients going to the heart. Sometimes they raise bad lipids and lower good cholesterol, or increase water retention [which raises blood pressure]or reduce the ability of the coronary arteries to dilate properly. And some, we don’t understand why they raise the risk for heart disease.” How could these drugs be developed by the pharmaceutical industry and be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yet make people with diabetes more likely to develop heart disease? Read on to find out how we got into this mess—and learn which diabetes drugs actually protect your heart. RESEARCHING DRUGS…WITH BLINDERS ON Until 2008, clinical studies needed to get diabetes drugs approved by the FDA didn’t have to even look at cardiovascular effects. They just had to show that the drugs lowered blood sugar (glucose). That’s a crucial omission, since the risk for stroke, heart disease and death from heart disease in patients with diabetes is at least twice that of patients without diabetes. So that year, the FDA made it clear to drug manufacturers that it wanted to see new drugs for type 2 diabetes undergo clinical trials to demonstrate cardiovascular safety—in addition to blood glucose effects. Now we’re seeing the results of these studies. One Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

A drug widely prescribed to those with diabetes could cause thyroid, heart and a host of other health problems, a study has warned. Metformin is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. But new research, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found the drug is linked to having an underactive thyroid. And the increased risk of producing low levels of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), can lead to complications, scientists have warned. The condition can cause heart disease, goitre - a lump in the throat caused by a swollen thyroid - pregnancy problems and a life-threatening condition called myxoedema coma. Both men and women can have an underactive thyroid, though the condition is more common in women. In the UK, it affects 15 in every 1,000 women and one in 1,000 men. The condition can also develop in children. The amount of metformin an individual needs to control blood sugar levels is worked out by a person's doctor or diabetes team. However, some previous research has raised concerns that the drug may lower thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. The study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, examined data on 74,300 patients who received metformin and sulfonylurea, another common diabetes drug, over a 25-year study period. Of these people, 5,689 were being treated for an underactive thyroid, and 59,937 had normal thyroid function. In the group with an underactive thyroid, there were 495 incidences of low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (119.7 per 1000) per year compared with 322 in the normal group (4.5 per 1000). In patients with a treated underactive thyroid, metformin was associated with a 55 per cent increased risk of low TSH levels compared with treatment wit Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide and metformin combination is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by a type of diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) called type 2 diabetes. Normally, after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body store excess sugar for later use. This process occurs during normal digestion of food. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes, but often medicines are needed to help your body. With two actions, the combination of glyburide and metformin helps your body cope with high blood sugar. Glyburide causes your pancreas to release more insulin into the bloodstream. Metformin reduces the absorption of sugar, reduces the release of stored sugar from the liver, and helps your body's cells use sugar better. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered: Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully. Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of glyburide and metformin combination in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been establi Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

More in ketosis