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Can Lr Cause Lactic Acidosis?

Lactated Ringers - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Lactated Ringers - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Generic Name: sodium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium lactate and calcium chloride Lactated Ringers Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic solution for fluid and electrolyte replenishment in single dose containers for intravenous administration. It contains no antimicrobial agents. Composition, osmolarity, pH, ionic concentration and caloric content are shown in Table 1. The VIAFLEX plastic container is fabricated from a specially formulated polyvinyl chloride (PL 146 Plastic). The amount of water that can permeate from inside the container into the overwrap is insufficient to affect the solution significantly. Solutions in contact with the plastic container can leach out certain of its chemical components in very small amounts within the expiration period, e.g., di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), up to 5 parts per million. However, the safety of the plastic has been confirmed in tests in animals according to USP biological tests for plastic containers as well as by tissue culture toxicity studies. Lactated Ringers Injection, USP has value as a source of water and electrolytes. It is capable of inducing diuresis depending on the clinical condition of the patient. Lactated Ringers Injection, USP produces a metabolic alkalinizing effect. Lactate ions are metabolized ultimately to carbon dioxide and water, which requires the consumption of hydrogen cations. Indications and Usage for Lactated Ringers Lactated Ringers Injection, USP is indicated as a source of water and electrolytes or as an alkalinizing agent. As for other calcium-containing infusion solutions, concomitant administration of ceftriaxone and Lactated Ringers Injection, USP is contraindicated in newborns ( 28 days of age), even if separate infusion lines are used (risk of fatal ceftriaxone-calcium salt Continue reading >>

Which Solution Is The Best Solution (to Resuscitation In Sepsis)? - Critical Care Medicine Section Newsletter, August 2011

Which Solution Is The Best Solution (to Resuscitation In Sepsis)? - Critical Care Medicine Section Newsletter, August 2011

Which solution is the best solution (to resuscitation in sepsis)? - Critical Care Medicine Section Newsletter, August 2011 Department of Critical Care / Emergency Medicine Before you spend any time reading this be warned: this article does not answer the question, which is the best fluid for resuscitating septic patients. I do not think there is a proven evidence-based answer. This paucity of evidence disturbs me because every day we give crystalloid fluids thinking it is harmless, but perhaps this intervention is all wrong. For example, it was recently shown that children with impaired perfusion due to malaria did worse with fluid boluses compared to no boluses.(1) This is completely counterintuitive, but that is the newest evidence. This paper intends to re-examine the evidence for fluid choice in septic shock (crystalloids, colloids and blood) to see if it makes physiologic sense during resuscitation. Let us start with some physiology. One of the major goals in sepsis is to fill the tank (ie, increasing intravascular volume). This increases cardiac filling, increasing cardiac output (steeper portion of starling curve), and subsequently improve tissue perfusion. Filling the tank too much, however, may cause both tissue edema (with subsequent organ dysfunction) and reduce cardiac output (Over-stretching myocardial fibers; the flat portion of starling curve). All this must be considered as intravascular volume is seeping out of a vasodilated system with leaky capillaries (from the septic milieu) causing interstitial edema and potential organ dysfunction. The second physiologic consideration is to avoid over-filling the tank. Recent studies demonstrated better outcomes with a conservative or drier fluid strategy.(2,3,4) Therefore, the mantra of give more fluid must be t Continue reading >>

Fluid Resuscitation

Fluid Resuscitation

Normal saline can cause a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, whereas lactated ringers can cause a metabolic alkalosis secondary to metabolism of lactate (which produces bicarbonate). Never use LR with blood products as the calcium will bind to the citrate. Dextrose-containing solutions should be avoided in patients with neurologic injuries as they may cause hyperglycemia, cerebral acidosis, and an osmotic diuresis [Stoelting et. al. Basics of Anesthesia, 5th ed. Elsevier China, p. 351, 2007]. It is well established that hypotonic fluids cause brain edema (thus do not use Lactated ringers for large volume resuscitation), although animal studies suggest that crystalloids increase cerebral edema and ICP only when they result in hypoosmolality [Crit Care Med 16: 862, 1988; Anesthesiology 67: 936, 1987] Half-life of albumin is 16 hours. Hydroxyethyl starch is made of either 6% MW hetastarch in saline [Hespan] or 6% MW hetastarch in balanced salt solution [Hextend]. 90% of hydroxylethyl starch particles last 17 days. Dextran comes in dextran 40 and dextran 70. Larger particles have a half-life in the order of days, thus dextran 70 is generally used for volume resuscitation, while dextram 40 is used to improve blood flow to the microcirculation. Hypersensitivity reactions to colloids are possible, but rare. Note that the dextrans can reduce platelet aggregation and adhesiveness, and that hydroxyethyl starch can reduce factor VIII and vWF, as mentioned in Barrons review of 113 studies (which stated Artificial colloid administration was consistently associated with coagulopathy and clinical bleeding, most frequently in cardiac surgery patients receiving hydroxyethyl starch) [Barron ME et. al. Arch Surg 139: 552, 2004]. All colloids share the following potential downsides volume Continue reading >>

Fluid Management In Diabetic-acidosis—ringer's Lactate Versus Normal Saline: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Fluid Management In Diabetic-acidosis—ringer's Lactate Versus Normal Saline: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Objective: To determine if Ringer's lactate is superior to 0.9% sodium chloride solution for resolution of acidosis in the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design: Parallel double blind randomized controlled trial. Methods: Patients presenting with DKA at Kalafong and Steve Biko Academic hospitals were recruited for inclusion in this study if they were >18 years of age, had a venous pH >6.9 and ≤7.2, a blood glucose of >13 mmol/l and had urine ketones of ≥2+. All patients had to be alert enough to give informed consent and should have received <1 l of resuscitation fluid prior to enrolment. Results: Fifty-seven patients were randomly allocated, 29 were allocated to receive 0.9% sodium chloride solution and 28 to receive Ringer's lactate (of which 27 were included in the analysis in each group). An adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis was done to compare the time to normalization of pH between the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and Ringer's lactate groups. The hazard ratio (Ringer's compared with 0.9% sodium chloride solution) for time to venous pH normalization (pH = 7.32) was 1.863 (95% CI 0.937–3.705, P = 0.076). The median time to reach a pH of 7.32 for the 0.9% sodium chloride solution group was 683 min (95% CI 378–988) (IQR: 435–1095 min) and for Ringer's lactate solution 540 min (95% CI 184–896, P = 0.251). The unadjusted time to lower blood glucose to 14 mmol/l was significantly longer in the Ringer's lactate solution group (410 min, IQR: 240–540) than the 0.9% sodium chloride solution group (300 min, IQR: 235–420, P = 0.044). No difference could be demonstrated between the Ringer's lactate and 0.9% sodium chloride solution groups in the time to resolution of DKA (based on the ADA criteria) (unadjusted: P = 0.934, adjusted: P = 0.75 Continue reading >>

In Sepsis, Fluid Choice Matters

In Sepsis, Fluid Choice Matters

You are at: Home Research In Sepsis, Fluid Choice Matters During a large-volume sepsis resuscitation, your choice of fluids specially which crystalloid solution could mean the difference between life, death and dialysis Included in the emergency physicians skill set is their ability to resuscitate critically ill patients; an example of this is the emergency department care of the septic patient. Given the general delay in translating medical knowledge to the bedside, its remarkable to see the vast change in the management of these patients since Dr. Rivers published his ground-breaking paper [ 1 ]. In a relatively short period of time, weve made aggressive fluid resuscitation and early antibiotics the standard of care and now focus our attention on improving other aspects of the resuscitation. Recent literature has studied goal MAP requirements [ 2 ], endpoints such as lactate clearance vs ScvO2 [ 3 ], and how best to evaluate volume responsiveness (IVC measurement [ 4 ], passive leg raise [ 5 ], carotid velocity time integral [ 6 ]). One element that has received far less attention is the type of fluid that is administered during the resuscitation. As it turns out, the type of fluid you choose does matter; it may be the difference between your patient requiring dialysis or even dying. Specifically, which crystalloid solution should be your fluid of choice in patients requiring large-volume resuscitations, such as those with sepsis or diabetic ketoacidosis? There are different types of crystalloid fluids. Crystalloids such as lactated ringers (LR) or PlasmaLyte are considered balanced fluids, while chloride-rich fluids such as normal saline (NS) are not. Colloids including albumin and starches are not considered in this discussion. What makes some fluids balanced and o Continue reading >>

Effect Of Intravenous Lactated Ringer's Solution Infusion On The Circulatinglactate Concentration: Part 3. Results Of A Prospective, Randomized,double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

Effect Of Intravenous Lactated Ringer's Solution Infusion On The Circulatinglactate Concentration: Part 3. Results Of A Prospective, Randomized,double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

1. Crit Care Med. 1997 Nov;25(11):1851-4. Effect of intravenous lactated Ringer's solution infusion on the circulatinglactate concentration: Part 3. Results of a prospective, randomized,double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Didwania A(1), Miller J, Kassel D, Jackson EV Jr, Chernow B. (1)Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University/Sinai Hospital Program in Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21215-5271, USA. Comment in Crit Care Med. 1997 Nov;25(11):1780-1. OBJECTIVES: We previously discovered that small amounts of lactated Ringer'ssolution, which are inadequately cleared from an intravenous catheter, falselyincrease the circulating lactate concentration in blood samples collected fromthat catheter. That finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that intravenouslactated Ringer's solution, infused at a rate used in resuscitation, wouldincrease the circulating lactate concentration.DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.SETTING: A critical care research laboratory.SUBJECTS: Twenty-four normal, healthy, adult volunteer subjects.INTERVENTIONS: Two intravenous catheters were placed. One was used for theinfusion of the test solution and the other catheter was used for blood sampling.Blood samples were serially collected for the determination of blood lactateconcentrations.MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers wererandomized to receive a 1-hr infusion of either lactated Ringer's solution (n =6), 0.9% saline (n = 6), 5% dextrose in lactated Ringer's solution (D5RL) (n =6), or 5% dextrose in water (D5W) (n = 6). Each subject received nothing by mouthafter midnight. At 0800 hrs, catheters were inserted and each subject received 1 L of the assigned solution over 1 hr. Throughout the study, the subjects were at Continue reading >>

Lactated Ringer's Solution

Lactated Ringer's Solution

Christer Svensn, Peter Rodhe, in Pharmacology and Physiology for Anesthesia , 2013 Ringer's solutions are either called lactated or acetated Ringer's solutions, named for a British physiologist, or Hartmann's solution, named for a U.S. pediatrician who in the 1930s added lactate as a buffer to prevent acidosis in septic children.114,116 In the United States and worldwide, mainly lactated Ringer's (LR), or Hartmann's solution as it is called in the United Kingdom, is used (see Table 33-2) as the initial crystalloid for resuscitation and for perioperative maintenance. The buffer ion in acetated Ringer's (AR) is acetate, which is mostly used in Scandinavia. While both ions are metabolized to bicarbonate, acetate is more quickly metabolized.117 Lactate is metabolized in the liver and kidneys while acetate is metabolized in most tissues. Furthermore, lactate requires more oxygen for metabolism and causes a slight increase in plasma glucose, providing a theoretical advantage for the acetated Ringer's solution.118 Ringer's solutions are the fluids of choice for almost every situation. Although they are slightly hypotonic and low caloric, few side effects are observed. All Ringer's solutions are slightly vasodilatory and inflammatory. They distribute from the plasma to the interstitium in approximately 25 to 30 minutes with a distribution half-time of approximately 8 minutes.98 However, this is a static concept of distribution. The fluid load is either readily eliminated or distributed to the interstitium. The volume effect of a crystalloid such as LR could be substantial depending on the effects of anesthesia, surgery, trauma, and hemorrhage.83 However, the concept of calculating volume effects based on hemoglobin dilution (hematocrit dilution) is sometimes challenged by rese Continue reading >>

Lactated Ringers And Lactate Clearance

Lactated Ringers And Lactate Clearance

SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community! I often get asked if lactated ringers worsens lactic acidosis... I've been told that lactated ringers will worsen lactic acidosis in liver failure... I've been asked if the lactate in lactated ringers will "falsely" elevate lab values. Personally, this is my go to crystalloid. Plasmalyte would be my only choice if it didnt cost 2-3x as much as LR. I know the answers to the above but would like to hear your thoughts. Now with lactate being the new marker for adequate resuscitation in sepsis I think its a good topic. I often get asked if lactated ringers worsens lactic acidosis... I've been told that lactated ringers will worsen lactic acidosis in liver failure... I've been asked if the lactate in lactated ringers will "falsely" elevate lab values. Personally, this is my go to crystalloid. Plasmalyte would be my only choice if it didnt cost 2-3x as much as LR. I know the answers to the above but would like to hear your thoughts. Now with lactate being the new marker for adequate resuscitation in sepsis I think its a good topic. Yes, it can falsely elevate serum lactate numbers and it it definitely more pronounced in bad livers. And I don't know why you'd use LR or Plasmalyte instead of NS for just about anything (unless of course you have stock in Baxter) Just be clear, I'm not saying using LR or plasmalyte is wrong - I just don't see the point I look @ the base labs, if they aren't already hyperchloremic ill start with NS, which I use for the 20mL/kg bolus, I tend to use LR for the second set of bolus, which comes after when I draw the lactic. I don't tend to redrawn lactic ~6 hour mark. Anecdotally it's I've not had many lactic acids bump but I know the LR can confound the data but is Continue reading >>

Does Lrs Increase Lactate Levels? | Dr. Soren Boysen | Vetgirl Veterinary Ce Blog

Does Lrs Increase Lactate Levels? | Dr. Soren Boysen | Vetgirl Veterinary Ce Blog

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Lactated Ringer's (lactated Ringer's Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Lactated Ringer's (lactated Ringer's Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

(dextrose, sodium chloride, sodium lactate, potassiumchloride, and calcium chloride) injection, solution 5% Dextrose in Lactated Ringer's Injection Each 100 mL of 5% Dextrose in Lactated Ringer's Injectioncontains: Hydrous Dextrose USP 5 g; Sodium Chloride USP 0.6 g Sodium Lactate 0.31 g; Potassium Chloride USP 0.03 g Calculated Osmolarity : 530 mOsmol/liter, hypertonicConcentration of Electrolytes (mEq/liter): Sodium 130 Potassium 4 Calcium 3 Chloride 112 Lactate (CH3CH(OH)COO-)28 5% Dextrose in Lactated Ringer's Injection is sterile,nonpyrogenic and contains no bacteriostatic or antimicrobial agents. Thisproduct is intended for intravenous administration. The formulas of the active ingredients are: The EXCEL Container is Latex-free, PVC -free, and DEHP -free. The plastic container is made from a multilayered filmspecifically developed for parenteral drugs. It contains no plasticizers andexhibits virtually no leachables. The solution contact layer is a rubberized copolymerof ethylene and propylene. The container is nontoxic and biologically inert.The containersolution unit is a closed system and is not dependent upon entryof external air during administration. The container is overwrapped to provideprotection from the physical environment and to provide an additional moisturebarrier when necessary. Addition of medication should be accomplished usingcomplete aseptic technique. The closure system has two ports; the one for theadministration set has a tamper evident plastic protector and the other is amedication addition site. Refer to the Directions for Use of the container. This solution is indicated for use in adults andpediatric patients as a source of electrolytes, calories and water forhydration. This solution is for intravenous use only. Dosage is to be directed b Continue reading >>

Comparisons Of Normal Saline And Lactated Ringers Resuscitation On Hemodynamics, Metabolic Responses, And Coagulation In Pigs After Severe Hemorrhagic Shock

Comparisons Of Normal Saline And Lactated Ringers Resuscitation On Hemodynamics, Metabolic Responses, And Coagulation In Pigs After Severe Hemorrhagic Shock

Comparisons of normal saline and lactated Ringers resuscitation on hemodynamics, metabolic responses, and coagulation in pigs after severe hemorrhagic shock 1US Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Ft, 3698 Chambers Pass, Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA Received 2013 Aug 22; Accepted 2013 Dec 5. Copyright 2013 Martini et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Ongoing improvements in trauma care now recommend earlier use of blood products as part of damage control resuscitation, but generally these products are not available at far forward battlefield locations. For the military, questions continue to arise regarding efficacy of normal saline (NS) vs. lactated Ringers (LR). Thus, this study compared the effects of LR and NS after severe hemorrhage in pigs. 20 anesthetized pigs were randomized into control (n = 6), LR (n = 7), and NS (n = 7) groups. Hemorrhage of 60% estimated total blood volume was induced in LR and NS groups by removing blood from the left femoral artery using a computer-controlled pump. Afterwards, the pigs were resuscitated with either LR at 3 times the bled volume or the volume of NS to reach the same mean arterial pressure (MAP) as in LR group. Hemodynamics were measured hourly and blood samples were taken at baseline (BL), 15min, 3h and 6h after resuscitation to measure changes in coagulation using thrombelastograph. MAP was decreased by hemorrhage but returned to BL within 1h after resuscitation with LR (119 7ml/kg) or NS (183 9ml/kg, p < 0.05). Base excess (BE) was decr Continue reading >>

Clinical Review: Acidbase Abnormalities In The Intensive Care Unit

Clinical Review: Acidbase Abnormalities In The Intensive Care Unit

Clinical review: Acidbase abnormalities in the intensive care unit Acidbase abnormalities are common in the critically ill. The traditional classification of acidbase abnormalities and a modern physico-chemical method of categorizing them will be explored. Specific disorders relating to mortality prediction in the intensive care unit are examined in detail. Lactic acidosis, base excess, and a strong ion gap are highlighted as markers for increased risk of death. acidbase disordersbase excesslactic acidosismetabolic acidosisstrong ion gap Deranged acidbase physiology drives admission to a critical care arena for vast numbers of patients. Management of diverse disorders ranging from diabetic ketoacidosis to hypoperfusion with lactic acidosis from hemorrhagic or septic shock shares a variety of common therapies for disordered acidbase balance. It is encumbent upon the intensivist to decode the deranged physiology and to categorize the disorder in a meaningful fashion to direct effective repair strategies [ 1 ]. Besides the traditional classification of respiratory versus metabolic, acidosis versus alkalosis, and gap versus nongap (normal gap), the intensivist benefits from classifying acidbase disorders into three discrete groups: iatrogenically induced (i.e. hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis), a fixed feature of a pre-existing disease process (i.e. chronic renal failure, hyperlactatemia), or a labile feature of an evolving disease process (i.e. lactic acidosis from hemorrhage, shock of any cause). The therapy for, and the outcome from, each of these three categories may be distinctly different. A review of the genesis of acidbase abnormalities is appropriate but will be limited to metabolic derangements, as respiratory acidbase abnormalities are usually reparable with ad Continue reading >>

Ringer's Lactate Solution

Ringer's Lactate Solution

Side effects may include allergic reactions , high blood potassium , volume overload , and high blood calcium . [2] It may not be suitable for mixing with certain medications and some recommend against use in the same infusion as a blood transfusion . [4] Ringer's lactate solution has a lower rate of acidosis as compared with normal saline . [1] [4] Use is generally safe in pregnancy and breastfeeding . [2] Ringer's lactate solution is in the crystalloid family of medication. [5] It is the same tonicity as blood . [2] Ringer's solution was invented in the 1880s with lactate being added in the 1930s. [4] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines , the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system . [6] Lactated Ringer's is available as a generic medication . [1] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 0.60 to 2.30 USD per liter. [7] For people with poor liver function , Ringer's acetate may be a better alternative with the lactate replaced by acetate . [8] In Scandinavia Ringer's acetate is typically used. [9] Ringer's lactate solution is very often used for fluid resuscitation after a blood loss due to trauma , surgery , or a burn injury .[ citation needed ] Ringer's lactate solution is used because the by-products of lactate metabolism in the liver counteract acidosis , which is a chemical imbalance that occurs with acute fluid loss or renal failure. [10] The IV dose of Ringer's lactate solution is usually calculated by estimated fluid loss and presumed fluid deficit. For fluid resuscitation the usual rate of administration is 20 to 30 ml/kg body weight/hour. RL is not suitable for maintenance therapy (i.e., maintenance fluids) because the sodium content (130 mEq/L) is considered too low, particularly for children, Continue reading >>

Does Intravenous Lactated Ringer Solution Raise Measured Serum Lactate?

Does Intravenous Lactated Ringer Solution Raise Measured Serum Lactate?

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Does Intravenous Lactated Ringer Solution Raise Measured Serum Lactate? The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02950753 University Medical Center of Southern Nevada Information provided by (Responsible Party): Joseph Anthony Zitek, University Medical Center of Southern Nevada Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Lactated Ringer's (LR) solution bolus is commonly administered in the emergency department setting to seriously ill patients. It is also common to obtain blood samples to determine serum lactate levels to aid in the assessment of the patient's degree of illness. This study endeavors to determine if serum lactate levels are affected by LR fluid administration in healthy adult individuals as compared to those who receive Normal Saline (NS). Healthy adult volunteers will be used as subjects so that the illness of hospital patients does not confound the results. Drug: Lactated Ringer Solution Drug: Normal Saline Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Does Intravenous Lactated Ringer Solution Raise Measured Serum Lactate? Intravenous bolus of Lactated Ringer solution (30ml/kg) via 18ga IV catheter at wide open. Fluid bolus of Lactated Ringer solution (30ml/kg). Intravenous bolus of Normal Saline (30ml/kg) via 18ga IV catheter at wide open. Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Continue reading >>

Why Do We Use Ringers Lactate To Treat Shock? - Quora

Why Do We Use Ringers Lactate To Treat Shock? - Quora

Why do we use Ringers lactate to treat shock? Answered May 23, 2017 Author has 507 answers and 324.7k answer views Lactated Ringers Solution is actually a more balanced crystalloid solution than is normal saline. Therefore, when you have to infuse large volumes of fluid quickly, as is the case when resuscitating hypotensive septic or extremely dehydrated patients, LR is a better choice. Large amounts of NS can result in a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. It turns out that the sodium isn't the problem, but rather the chloride. This means that NS is out of balance with the chloride levels in the body. If you're just infusing small volumes, it's likely not going to be an issue whether you choose LR or NS. However, one might give more thought to certain patient populations, such as dialysis patients, perhaps. Here's an article that discusses the issues as well as several studies addressing this: In Sepsis, Fluid Choice Matters - Emergency Physicians Monthly I used to work in the ER, and conventional wisdom when I started was that LR was better than NS for any hypovolemic resuscitation. But then LR was a bit more expensive than NS, and the pharmacists determined that there really was little difference between NS and LR. The one concern was that indiscriminate amounts of LR could cause a metabolic alkalosis from the lactate, something I didn't see discussed in the above article. In any event, we were encouraged to order NS, and, eventually, LR was removed from the Pyxis altogether. And now the pendulum has swung back the other way. Best practice favors LR for septic shock resuscitation currently, but it looks like there's room for additional studies. It's certain that hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a very real concern, especially in septic patients, who already tend Continue reading >>

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