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Can Lr Cause Lactic Acidosis?

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What is INSULIN SHOCK THERAPY? What does INSULIN SHOCK THERAPY mean? INSULIN SHOCK THERAPY meaning - INSULIN SHOCK THERAPY definition - INSULIN SHOCK THERAPY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin shock therapy or insulin coma therapy (ICT) was a form of psychiatric treatment in which patients were repeatedly injected with large doses of insulin in order to produce daily comas over several weeks. It was introduced in 1927 by Austrian-American psychiatrist Manfred Sakel and used extensively in the 1940s and 1950s, mainly for schizophrenia, before falling out of favour and being replaced by neuroleptic drugs in the 1960s. It was one of a number of physical treatments introduced into psychiatry in the first four decades of the twentieth century. These included the convulsive therapies (cardiazol/metrazol therapy and electroconvulsive therapy), deep sleep therapy and psychosurgery. Insulin coma therapy and the convulsive therapies are collectively known as the shock therapies. Insulin coma therapy was a labour-intensive treatment that required trained staff and a special unit. Patients, who were almost invariably diagnosed with schizophrenia, were selected on the basis of having a good prognosis and the physical strength to withstand an arduous treatment. There were no standard guidelines for treatment; different hospitals and psychiatrists developed their own protocols. Typically, injections were administered six days a week for about two months. The daily insulin dose was gradually increased to 100150 units until comas were produced, at which point the dose would be levelled out. Occasionally doses of up to 450 units were used. After about 50 or 60 comas, or earlier if the psychiatrist thought that maximum benefit had been achieved, the dose of insulin was rapidly reduced before treatment was stopped. Courses of up to 2 years have been documented. After the insulin injection patients would experience various symptoms of decreased blood glucose: flushing, pallor, perspiration, salivation, drowsiness or restlessness. Sopor and comaif the dose was high enoughwould follow. Each coma would last for up to an hour and be terminated by intravenous glucose. Seizures sometimes occurred before or during the coma. Many would be tossing, rolling, moaning, twitching, spasming or thrashing around. Some psychiatrists regarded seizures as therapeutic and patients were sometimes also given electroconvulsive therapy or cardiazol/metrazol convulsive therapy during the coma, or on the day of the week when they didnt have insulin treatment. When they were not in a coma, insulin coma patients were kept together in a group and given special treatment and attention; one handbook for psychiatric nurses, written by British psychiatrist Eric Cunningham Dax, instructs nurses to take their insulin patients out walking and occupy them with games and competitions, flower-picking and map-reading, etc. Patients required continuous supervision as there was a danger of hypoglycemic aftershocks after the coma. In "modified insulin therapy", used in the treatment of neurosis, patients were given lower (sub-coma) doses of insulin. A few psychiatrists (including Sakel) claimed success rates for insulin coma therapy of over 80 percent in the treatment of schizophrenia; a few others argued that it merely sped up remission in those patients who would undergo remission anyway. The consensus at the time was somewhere in between - claiming a success rate of about 50 percent in patients who had been ill for less than a year (about double the spontaneous remission rate) with no influence on relapse. Sakel suggested the therapy worked by "causing an intensification of the tonus of the parasympathetic end of the autonomic nervous system, by blockading the nerve cell, and by strengthening the anabolic force which induces the restoration of the normal function of the nerve cell and the recovery of the patient." The shock therapies in general had developed on the erroneous premise that epilepsy and schizophrenia rarely occurred in the same patient. Another theory was that patients were somehow "jolted" out of their mental illness.

Why Do We Use Ringers Lactate To Treat Shock? - Quora

Why do we use Ringers lactate to treat shock? Answered May 23, 2017 Author has 507 answers and 324.7k answer views Lactated Ringers Solution is actually a more balanced crystalloid solution than is normal saline. Therefore, when you have to infuse large volumes of fluid quickly, as is the case when resuscitating hypotensive septic or extremely dehydrated patients, LR is a better choice. Large amounts of NS can result in a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. It turns out that the sodium isn't the problem, but rather the chloride. This means that NS is out of balance with the chloride levels in the body. If you're just infusing small volumes, it's likely not going to be an issue whether you choose LR or NS. However, one might give more thought to certain patient populations, such as dialysis patients, perhaps. Here's an article that discusses the issues as well as several studies addressing this: In Sepsis, Fluid Choice Matters - Emergency Physicians Monthly I used to work in the ER, and conventional wisdom when I started was that LR was better than NS for any hypovolemic resuscitation. But then LR was a bit more expensive than NS, and the pharmacists determined that there really was Continue reading >>

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  1. AnnieC

    Keto insomnia?

    I've been doing this for 5 days now and I had a lot of trouble sleeping unlike before where I had no trouble falling asleep. Have any of you experienced this?

  2. maresf16

    Yea when I was "adjusting" I kept getting massive headaches and feverish. I woke up every two hours if I was sleeping reasonably well, and sometimes I just drifted in and out of consciousness by the minutes. It's passed now, but I don't remember it taking 5 days.

  3. AnnieC

    Originally Posted by maresf16
    Yea when I was "adjusting" I kept getting massive headaches and feverish. I woke up every two hours if I was sleeping reasonably well, and sometimes I just drifted in and out of consciousness by the minutes. It's passed now, but I don't remember it taking 5 days.

    How long have you been doing it?
    Maybe it takes longer for me because my metabolism is more screwed up eheh. I've been a mega-sugar addict all my life. This is a HUGE change for me. At least, I don't feel as sluggish now as I did on day 3 so that's pretty good!

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Lactated ringers refers to intravenous fluid that is used to treat someone after trauma, blood loss, fluid loss or burn injury. Find out why normal saline can be preferable to lactated ringers, because lactated ringers creates an imbalance within electrolytes, with help from a licensed RN in this free video on IV fluids. Expert: Kayti Brosnan Bio: Kayti Brosnan has been a licensed RN in the state of Texas since 2003. Filmmaker: Todd Green

Fluid Management In Diabetic-acidosis—ringer's Lactate Versus Normal Saline: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Objective: To determine if Ringer's lactate is superior to 0.9% sodium chloride solution for resolution of acidosis in the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design: Parallel double blind randomized controlled trial. Methods: Patients presenting with DKA at Kalafong and Steve Biko Academic hospitals were recruited for inclusion in this study if they were >18 years of age, had a venous pH >6.9 and ≤7.2, a blood glucose of >13 mmol/l and had urine ketones of ≥2+. All patients had to be alert enough to give informed consent and should have received <1 l of resuscitation fluid prior to enrolment. Results: Fifty-seven patients were randomly allocated, 29 were allocated to receive 0.9% sodium chloride solution and 28 to receive Ringer's lactate (of which 27 were included in the analysis in each group). An adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis was done to compare the time to normalization of pH between the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and Ringer's lactate groups. The hazard ratio (Ringer's compared with 0.9% sodium chloride solution) for time to venous pH normalization (pH = 7.32) was 1.863 (95% CI 0.937–3.705, P = 0.076). The median time to reach a pH of 7.32 for the Continue reading >>

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  1. hayley1952

    do you have to actually be in Ketosis to lose weight?

    is everybody so obsessed with being in Ketosis on the Atkins diet because if your not, you don't lose weight?



















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    or is it possible to still lose weight on the low carb diet without actually being in Ketosis?

  2. Shingi

    No, you do not have to be in ketosis to lose weight!
    However, being in ketosis helps reduce hunger pangs and cravings, therefore makes it easier for most to stay on course - but it is NOT necessary for weightloss!

  3. miu

    hi I started 3 weeks ago and i was in ketosis and all was ok and now i started to work out and the stix dont change color almost AT ALL and now I feel i want to eat more... past three weeks I was totally indifferent when i m gonna eat, i was never hungry .. now am still not hungry but am carving food. still managed not to eat more carbs though but am not happy with it bc am afraid i will get into a proper binge soon or later...
    so is there anything to do with working out or is that normal that once i have the stix dark red and few days later nothing while i eat exactly the same ?

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Clinical Review: Acidbase Abnormalities In The Intensive Care Unit

Clinical review: Acidbase abnormalities in the intensive care unit Acidbase abnormalities are common in the critically ill. The traditional classification of acidbase abnormalities and a modern physico-chemical method of categorizing them will be explored. Specific disorders relating to mortality prediction in the intensive care unit are examined in detail. Lactic acidosis, base excess, and a strong ion gap are highlighted as markers for increased risk of death. acidbase disordersbase excesslactic acidosismetabolic acidosisstrong ion gap Deranged acidbase physiology drives admission to a critical care arena for vast numbers of patients. Management of diverse disorders ranging from diabetic ketoacidosis to hypoperfusion with lactic acidosis from hemorrhagic or septic shock shares a variety of common therapies for disordered acidbase balance. It is encumbent upon the intensivist to decode the deranged physiology and to categorize the disorder in a meaningful fashion to direct effective repair strategies [ 1 ]. Besides the traditional classification of respiratory versus metabolic, acidosis versus alkalosis, and gap versus nongap (normal gap), the intensivist benefits from classifyin Continue reading >>

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  1. Porthardygurl

    I am feeling rather upset and concerned right now at this time. I have been OP since i started this program this time around..Not a lick , taste or a bite and my numbers show the continuous losses from week to week..I have been so happy being in ketosis and not feeling hungry...
    HOWEVER... I was feeling seriously nauseated in the store today, felt like i was going to puke...so my hubby grabbed me a 1 litre gingerale and we booked it out of there pronto...I get to the car, unscrew the cap and suck it back like nobodys business...hoping that it would help..Well..good news is..it did help... BAD NEWS is... It wasnt diet ...
    I didnt even look at the label on the bottle till after i had drank some..Usually i pick up diet .... i never buy the sugar laden soft drinks..but my hunny must have picked it up in a rush, and didnt look..and of course me thinking that he has my best interest at heart..assumed it was diet....
    So now im seriously conerned i have knocked myself out of ketosis...
    The carb content per 8oz were 25 grams of carbs... 16 grams of sugar...
    I measured the rest of the gingerale out when i got home to see how much i had drank..and it looks like maybe 1/2 a cup was gone..My question is...if thats half a cup...then thats about 13 total carbs for that 1/2 cup....
    My other food for the day..has consisted of..
    morning shake: 2 g net carb
    Lunch shake : 2 g net carb
    wafer packet alternative: 6 net carb
    So thats 10 grams of Net carbs without adding in vegs yet...So 10 plus 12 is 22 Net carbs...will this kick me out of ketosis????? Ive worked so hard to stay OP 100% I dont want to have ruined it...

  2. CarCamMom

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Porthardygurl
    I am feeling rather upset and concerned right now at this time. I have been OP since i started this program this time around..Not a lick , taste or a bite and my numbers show the continuous losses from week to week..I have been so happy being in ketosis and not feeling hungry...
    HOWEVER... I was feeling seriously nauseated in the store today, felt like i was going to puke...so my hubby grabbed me a 1 litre gingerale and we booked it out of there pronto...I get to the car, unscrew the cap and suck it back like nobodys business...hoping that it would help..Well..good news is..it did help... BAD NEWS is... It wasnt diet ...
    I didnt even look at the label on the bottle till after i had drank some..Usually i pick up diet .... i never buy the sugar laden soft drinks..but my hunny must have picked it up in a rush, and didnt look..and of course me thinking that he has my best interest at heart..assumed it was diet....
    So now im seriously conerned i have knocked myself out of ketosis...
    The carb content per 8oz were 25 grams of carbs... 16 grams of sugar...
    I measured the rest of the gingerale out when i got home to see how much i had drank..and it looks like maybe 1/2 a cup was gone..My question is...if thats half a cup...then thats about 13 total carbs for that 1/2 cup....
    My other food for the day..has consisted of..
    morning shake: 2 g net carb
    Lunch shake : 2 g net carb
    wafer packet alternative: 6 net carb
    So thats 10 grams of Net carbs without adding in vegs yet...So 10 plus 12 is 22 Net carbs...will this kick me out of ketosis????? Ive worked so hard to stay OP 100% I dont want to have ruined it... I wish I could help you, but I'm too new to be sure....All I can do is hope for you!! I think the magic number I hear is 40 carbs or less a day, so you might be ok???? I'm sure someone else will know. I've got my fingers crossed for you!
    Look on the bright side...this will make for an excellent update on IPTV!

  3. scorbett1103

    I'm way too new to be an expert, but I've done LOTS of reading on the forums since starting. I have seen more than one person post that their coach allowed for a "cheat" day (which I can only assume means they would be eating a lot more carbs than usual) followed by 2 days on VERY strict phase 1 protocol with NO restricted packets/bars. Not something to make a habit of, but it might be worth doing for the next 2 days and talk to your coach. You might stall just a little but you shouldn't lose too much ground.

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