diabetestalk.net

Can Ketosis Make You Depressed?

Can What You Eat Affect Your Mental Health? New Research Links Diet And The Mind.

Can What You Eat Affect Your Mental Health? New Research Links Diet And The Mind.

Jodi Corbitt had been battling depression for decades and by 2010 had resigned herself to taking antidepressant medication for the rest of her life. Then she decided to start a dietary experiment. To lose weight, the 47-year-old Catonsville, Md., mother stopped eating gluten, a protein found in wheat and related grains. Within a month she had shed several pounds — and her lifelong depression. “It was like a veil lifted and I could see life more clearly,” she recalled. “It changed everything.” Corbitt had stumbled into an area that scientists have recently begun to investigate: whether food can have as powerful an impact on the mind as it does on the body. Research exploring the link between diet and mental health “is a very new field; the first papers only came out a few years ago,” said Michael Berk, a professor of psychiatry at the Deakin University School of Medicine in Australia. “But the results are unusually consistent, and they show a link between diet quality and mental health.” “Diet quality” refers to the kinds of foods that people eat, how often they eat them and how much of them they eat. In several studies, including a 2011 analysis of more than 5,000 Norwegians, Berk and his collaborators have found lower rates of depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder among those who consumed a traditional diet of meat and vegetables than among people who followed a modern Western diet heavy with processed and fast foods or even a health-food diet of tofu and salads. “Traditional diets — the kinds of foods your grandmother would have recognized — have been associated with a lower risk of mental health issues,” Berk said. Interestingly, that traditional diet may vary widely across cultures, including wheat for some people but not for others; Continue reading >>

Inflammation, Ketones And Depression

Inflammation, Ketones And Depression

New theories on how inflammation may be a cause of depression, and how the ketogenic diet may be a novel treatment option Depression is the most commonly diagnosed neuropsychiatric disorder, (Chen, 2017) characterized by persistent feeling of sadness, loss of interest and hopelessness. Is it estimated that >16 million people in US have suffered from a depressive episode in the past year, which represents 6.7% of all American adults. The cause of depression has typically been blamed on a chemical imbalance in the brain, specifically a decrease in the monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine). Most of the anti-depressant medications work by increasing the levels of these monoamines neurotransmitters. It is estimated that a third of depressed patients treated with these anti-depressant medications however, do not improve. (Miller, 2016) (Yamanashi, 2017) So maybe the pathophysiology of depression is not that simple. Scientific evidence now suggests that inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of depression. Psychosocial stress is a very common risk factor for the development of depression. Studies have shown that stress, especially early life-trauma, is associated with an increase risk for developing depression. (Miller, 2016) Stress has been shown to cause many pathological changes in the body including increased inflammation. When the body is stressed, the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated. When activated the NLRP3 inflammasome causes the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1 beta, interleukin -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha). These pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are markers for inflammation, have been noted to be significantly higher in the brains of patients with depression and in people who have committed suici Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet The Cure For Depression And Anxiety?

Is The Ketogenic Diet The Cure For Depression And Anxiety?

>>Shop Amazon!<< I discuss the effects of a Ketogenic Diet with Alternate Day Fasting on Mental Health. My experiences with anxiety and depression during periods of Ketogenic Fat Adaptation. Intermittent Fasting and Keto are very powerful weapons in the arsenal against mental health issues. I believe it may be a cure for mental illness at least in my situation. I also go over Tryptophan as a building block for Serotonin. So a bad diet may cause depression as well. Stress reduction and dopamine regulation are also key factors. Support this channel and more content… New Music by Wes Derrickson Like me on Facebook >>Shop Amazon!<< Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Lifestyle Reversed My Depression

How The Ketogenic Lifestyle Reversed My Depression

I didn’t want to get out of bed, but I had to. I had to go to work, which, for me, on this particular day, meant walking 10 feet to my desk and opening up my laptop. The alarm on my phone had just gone off, so I knew it was 5 AM. By sheer force of will, I got out of bed and started my day. The previous day was the same as the one before it and the one before it and so on. But the tedium wasn’t the worst of it, the worst of it was that I had spent all of the previous day (and countless ones before it) angry, sad, and frustrated. And I knew that this day was going to be the same. I didn’t enjoy life. I didn’t enjoy anything. I didn’t know it at that moment, but in a little while, I would realize that I was depressed. And I had been depressed for a while. My job wasn’t particularly stressful, but it was unchallenging enough to make me dread it. I was also coming off a failed business start, one that I had spent way too many hours on over the past 10 months, so I was feeling like a particularly huge failure. I don’t know what was different about that day, but a couple of hours after I started work, I came to an emotional crossroads. Sitting there, I decided I had two choices, I could either give up or I could change something. I couldn’t give up, because I had a family to support. So I really only had one choice, and that was to change something. Sitting there, at my desk, with my head resting in my hands, I decided…and this may sound odd to someone who can’t relate, but I decided to change the most immediate and fundamental thing I could. I was going to change what I eat, and I was going to get back to being ketogenic. I had tried the ketogenic lifestyle before, but without any real determination or discipline. I decided that day that I was going to go Continue reading >>

Why Healthy Eating Causes That Uncomfortable Feeling

Why Healthy Eating Causes That Uncomfortable Feeling

Open this photo in gallery: You've sworn off alfredo sauce. You've cut out sugary vanilla lattes. You've swapped cupcakes for carrot sticks. So why do you feel so lousy? If the only greens you ate last year were the garnishes of parsley on your steak frites, chances are your body is going to protest when you suddenly start feeding it nothing but kale and broccoli. Although reducing your intake of salt, refined sugar, fat and caffeine will undoubtedly be good for you in the long run, a drastic change in diet can lead to short-term discomfort – think grinding headaches, leaden sluggishness, embarrassing bloating and a hangry temper. And no, this isn't because your body is ridding itself of impurities – whatever that means. Don't be fooled by diet fads and cleanses that claim these symptoms are the result of eliminating nebulous toxins. Dietary "detoxes" are bogus. Rather, if you're feeling unwell in your quest to eat better, dopamine, microbes and ketones may be the source of your discontent. Your brain is craving dopamine Foods that are loaded with salt, sugar and fat trigger the release of "feel-good" neurotransmitters, specifically dopamine, which activate the brain's reward centre, says Andrea D'Ambrosio, a registered dietitian and owner of Dietetic Directions in Waterloo, Ont. This explains why it's so enjoyable to eat highly processed fatty, salty and sugary foods, and why we tend to crave them. It's not unusual then to experience withdrawal-like symptoms, such as feeling moody, blue or antsy, when you go cold turkey after you've grown accustomed to eating highly processed foods, D'Ambrosio says. To adjust to a less processed diet, she suggests curbing cravings by eating a high-fibre breakfast with a source of protein, having strategic snacks, like an apple or b Continue reading >>

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

Ketogenic eating might just be the most popular idea in the unconventional health and fitness movement right now. I get dozens of emails a week from people asking for Keto tips and tricks. I’m not convinced that most of these people should be Keto though. It’s been billed as a great way to lose weight, which has attracted a lot of attention, but it’s not all roses, unicorns, and fairy dust. Here’s three reasons why you might want to reconsider your plan to go Keto… 1. Ketogenic eating is obsessive. When I interviewed Jimmy Moore, author of Keto Clarity, this is one of the issues I brought up. Ketosis is notoriously difficult to get into, verify, and sustain without bringing back some of the old, obsessive Dieting strategies that we’ve been working hard to get away from. Tracking macros, monitoring blood glucose, and testing ketone levels are all required steps in the process for most people. This kind of protocol attracts people with disordered eating habits. It’s the perfect blend of effective, obsessive, and new. If you’re trying to get into ketosis for medical reasons, then you’ve gotta do what you’ve gotta do. If you want to get into ketosis because you heard it’s great for weight loss or for some other non-medical reason, it’s too obsessive for my taste. 2. Ketogenic eating probably doesn’t fit your lifestyle. You know me—I’m not a huge fan of cardio or long workouts. I’m bearish on exercise as a modern concept, but I’m bullish on functional fitness and DWYLT. In other words, I want people to do active things they love with a little sprinting and short functional strength workouts thrown in. In order to actually enjoy those things and feel strong and healthy when doing them, you’ll need adequate glycogen. That’s something that Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Mental Health

Ketogenic Diet And Mental Health

Tweet Ketogenic diets show promise for improving mood and research suggests that the diet may possibly benefit a number of mental health conditions such as: Depression Bipolar disorder Schizophrenia Dementia In this guide, we look at the theory behind using a ketogenic diet for the treatment of these mental health conditions and how running on ketones can help stabilise mood. Whilst research shows promise, there’s currently a lack of robust clinical studies that have investigated the effectiveness of a ketogenic diet on mental health. Therefore, the benefits on mental health of ketogenic diets is currently unproven. How does the ketogenic diet work to improve mental health? Ketogenic diets appear to affect the brain in a number of positive ways, such as: Providing a 'feel good' effect Bolstering brain power Having antioxidant effects Boosting 'feel good' neurotransmitters Being in a state of ketosis has been shown to increase production of a common neurotransmitter in the brain called GABA. There is evidence that various anxiety disorders result from dysfunctional GABA activity. Studies conducted on the use of the ketogenic diet in seizure disorders, for example, tend to show that a good balance of GABA leads to better mental focus, reduced stress and anxiety. [252] [253] Bolstering brain power Contrary to common belief that glucose is essential for the brain, ketone bodies produced from fat, such as beta hydroxybutyrate, can provide an alternative ready fuel for the brain. Research suggests that ketones may even be a more efficient fuel for the brain than glucose. It is believed that ketones increase the number of energy factories (mitochondria) in brain cells, which boost the energy levels in those cells. This is important, as many mental disorders share one major p Continue reading >>

Question About The Brain, Carbs And Depression

Question About The Brain, Carbs And Depression

Q: Every nutritionist I have ever spoken to says that the brain can only metabolize carbs. They give this as one reason so many people are suffering from depression while on low carb diets. How do you respond to that? A: This is one of several myths perpetuated by “classically” trained nutritionists and medical doctors, and consequently believed by most people—that glucose is, of necessity, the body and brain’s primary fuel and completely essential at all times. This is 100% completely wrong—or is at least only conditionally true. The dependence on glucose is true IF—and only if—one has conditioned ones-self to be metabolically dependent on sugar as one’s primary source of fuel. The only tissues in the body absolutely dependent on glucose are your red blood cells. They feed anaerobically so they can preserve their precious cargo which is oxygen. Everything else in the human body, however, can function just beautifully and consistently on ketones. A person metabolically dependent, instead, on fat (a much more natural state for humans) as the primary fuel source has no such fundamental requirement for glucose. The evidence in the literature and basics of human physiology show unmistakably that the brain and body function far more efficiently, age more slowly and suffer far less oxidative stress when depending on ketones (and a few free fatty acids) instead of sugar (glucose) for one’s primary source of fuel. I showed textbook evidence to this effect in my book, Primal Body-Primal Mind. That people are more likely to feel “depressed” on a low carb diet is patently absurd and completely contrary to the scientific and overwhelming empirical evidence. A dependence on sugar means your moods are always dependent on where the glucose is swinging next and in Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet 'causes Mood Swings And Depression'

Atkins Diet 'causes Mood Swings And Depression'

Quick Links: Join our private community forum Join our facebook community Follow us on twitter Listen to Judy on NPR-affiliate WHDD-FM (click "Food for Mood") Subscribe to our Blog Read our Author Blog Sign up to receive our FREE one day meal Plan and Recipe of the Month (and receive a free one-day PDF sample of the diet when you sign up) Sign up for telephone consultation sessions Schedule a weight loss workshop for your community or organization The Serotonin Power Diet Health Correspondent, PA News Low carbohydrate regimes like the Atkins diet could lead to mood swings and depression and leave slimmers feeling like "an emotional zombie", researchers have claimed. The controversial high-protein, low-carb Atkins diet has prompted criticism from many doctors who fear it could increase the risk of long-term health problems such as kidney damage, high cholesterol and diabetes. More research in America has now suggested it could also affect mental health, leaving dieters feeling grumpy, tired, apathetic and restless. Dr Judith Wurtman and her colleagues, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) clinical research centre, found that when you stop eating carbohydrates, your brain stops regulating serotonin. This chemical elevates mood and suppresses appetite, and eating carbohydrates naturally stimulates its production. Antidepressant drugs make serotonin more active in the brain and help regulate mood. But carbohydrates raise serotonin levels naturally, acting as a natural tranquilliser. The MIT research looked at serotonin levels in the brains of 100 volunteers who ate different diets, either with a lot of meat and other high-protein foods, or with more carbohydrates, found in breads and cereals. They found that the brain only made serotonin after a person ate Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Really Fight Depression? Low-carb, High Fat Foods Shown To Drastically Improve Mental Health

Can A Ketogenic Diet Really Fight Depression? Low-carb, High Fat Foods Shown To Drastically Improve Mental Health

They say you are what eat, and we all know the difference a better diet makes to our complexion and our waistlines. But what about our heads? An increasing number of scientists are pointing to the Ketogenic diet - similar in nature to the low-carb, high-protein Atkins and Caveman meal plans, which have shown promising results in the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder. 'It's a very new field; the first papers only came out a few years ago,' Michael Berk, a professor of psychiatry at the Deakin University School of Medicine in Australia tells The Washington Post. 'But the results are unusually consistent, and they show a link between diet quality and mental health.' A Ketogenic diet typically restricts the intake of carbs to no more than 50g a day. A good rule of thumb is to follow the 60/35/5 rule in which 60 per cent of calories come from fat, 35 per cent from protein, and five per cent from carbs. Grass-fed meat, fish, dairy, nuts and avocado are top of the list in terms of foods that comply. Jodi Corbit, a 47-year-old mother from Catonsville, Maryland, had been battling depression for decades before adopting the Ketogenic diet in a bid to lose weight. To her surprise, she not only shifted several pounds, but also her lifelong depression. 'It was like a veil lifted and I could see life more clearly,' she explains. 'It changed everything.' Chow down: Although research on the mental benefits is still its early days, the Ketogenic diet has already been shown to drastically improve the symptoms of epilepsy, Alzheimer's and even cancer Dr El-Mallakh, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Louisville, believes there is a 'strong link' between Ketogenic eating and mental health. He authored a book on the subject, Bipolar Depression, and last year published t Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

Why Ketogenic Diet Is The Healthiest Diet. Treats Depression, Migraines, And Autism

Why Ketogenic Diet Is The Healthiest Diet. Treats Depression, Migraines, And Autism

Growing evidence shows that nutritional ketosis helps treat many health problems, starting with obesity. A ketogenic diet causes metabolic changes in the body, causing the body to shift from burning carbohydrates to burning fats. This diet requires 50-70 percent of the food intake to come from beneficial fats, such as organic pastured eggs, avocado, raw nuts, grass-pastured butter, and coconut oil. The carb intake is limited, leading to burning of fat for energy. In other words, there is little sugar blocking the body from using fat in favor of burning sugar. As mentioned above, the nutritional intake should be around 70 percent fats, 25 percent protein, and 5 percent carbohydrate. Therefore, the carbohydrates intake should be limited, mostly coming from nuts, dairy, and veggies. Avoid refined carbohydrates like starch ( potatoes, legumes), wheat( cereals, bread) or fruit. “The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories, but through starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are extremely adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the main energy source,” according to Ruled.me. Health Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet Leads to Weight Loss Eliminating carbs from your diet is one of the simplest ways to lose weight. When on a ketogenic diet, the carbohydrate intake is very low, protein is moderate, and fat intake is increased, so that the body relies on fat as a primary fuel and produces ketones from stored body fat. Fights Cancer Cancer cells feed on sugar, meaning that sugar supports cancer growth. Therefore, any diet that eliminates sugar and other carbs can be effective in preventing and Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Mental Health

The Ketogenic Diet And Mental Health

Inflammation is one of the most powerful factors which determines health and illness. Levels of inflammation in the body are very strongly influenced by dietary choices. In my holistic practice of psychiatry, one of the most important conversations which I have repeatedly with my patients, is the fundamental importance of following a non-inflammatory diet. This conversation must be had repeatedly, because diet is one of the very hardest things for most people to change. For optimum health, I believe that a Ketogenic Diet, one that is high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrate, exerts the most anti-inflammatory effect. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body; instead of deriving energy from carbohydrates which convert to glucose, energy is sourced from fats which convert in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, is correlated with myriad health benefits. In contrast, elevated levels of glucose leads to inflammation, insulin resistance and accelerates aging. Research on the impact of a ketogenic diet for Cancer, Autism, Alzheimer’s Disease, ALS, Parkinson’s Disease, Traumatic Brain Injuries, Sleep Disorders, Headaches, Bipolar Disorder, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease is emerging, and I anticipate that we are going to be hearing much more about its health benefits and novel applications. The ketogenic diet was used very effectively to treat epilepsy in the 1920’s, until anti-convulsant drugs were introduced in the 1940’s, when it fell out of favor. It’s easier to take pills than to follow a restrictive diet, and the pharmaceutical industry’s lobby is very influential. Pharmaceuticals, as opposed to dietary changes, remain the standard of care Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Depression

Ketosis & Depression

According to the British National Health Service, or NHS, ketosis results when too many ketones build up in your blood. Ketones are chemicals that your body produces as a byproduct of burning fat for fuel. Ketosis is a goal of some very-low-carb diets. Some people may experience increased symptoms of depression during ketosis because their bodies may have a hard time producing the mood-elevating chemical called serotonin. Video of the Day Carbs are your body's fuel of choice. When your body has very little carbohydrate available -- as it would after a week or so on a very-low-carb diet -- it is forced to start breaking down and using fat for energy. This process is called fat metabolism. The byproducts of fat metabolism include ketones, which are acidic chemicals that exit your body through urine and breath. Depressed people typically have a persistent feeling of sadness, worthlessness and emptiness. There are many possible reasons for depression; in some cases, depression results from a lack of the brain chemical serotonin, a compound that makes people feel naturally happy. According to MayoClinic.com, having too little serotonin can disrupt communication between your brain cells, making depression worse. Your body has to make serotonin; you can't get it from the food you eat. MedlinePlus explains that your body uses tryptophan, a type of protein, to make serotonin. You can find tryptophan in protein-rich foods like turkey, eggs and fish -- all foods that are allowed on a low-carb diet. So it would seem that people on low-carb diets should have all the tryptophan they need to make serotonin in excess, but that's not the end of the story. There is a tiny amount of tryptophan available compared to all the other kinds of protein in eggs. Since only so much protein can cro Continue reading >>

More in ketosis