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Can Ketosis Cause Uti

Urinary Infection Symptoms | Treatment | Inflammation Of The Bladder

Urinary Infection Symptoms | Treatment | Inflammation Of The Bladder

Urinary tract infection symptoms and treatment Urinary infections such as inflammation of the bladder - cystitis, urinary tract - urethritis affect any woman at least once in life. From these problems suffer men as well but much less frequently than the fairer sex. Urinary infection; Symptoms Problems in some cases are completely absent, and can range from very mild to extremely painful and unpleasant, accompanied by mild fever. Symptoms of bladder infections usually begin with sudden pain and a feeling of heaviness in the bladder. Frequent urination usually occurs, which is actually a defensive reaction of the organism which wants to get rid of bacteria, as well as a burning sensation when urinating. What scares the patients is the presence of blood in the urine, then whitish or cloudy urine. The fever can be a sign that the infection has spread to the kidneys, and in this case, is often accompanied by pain in the lumbar part of your back, vomiting and nausea. Urinary tract infection in women Mostly because of the anatomic structure of the urogenital system, women are far more susceptible to infections than men. Inflammation of bladder most often affects young women who only have sexual relations, as well as older postmenopausal women. Although complaints can be very unpleasant, this infection lenses quickly and easily using appropriate medications and herbal teas. However, if the treatment is not carried out in time, a bladder infection can spread to the kidneys and cause serious health problems. How urinary infections occur? It is often thought that urinary tract infections are transmitted only through sexual intercourse with an infected partner, but this is not true. However, sexual intercourse is a risk because the bacteria that are found between the anus and vagin Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Every time I go into ketosis for more than I a week or two, my bladder gets irritated and I experience UTI-like symptoms. The last time I experienced this in ketosis, I ended up doing a round of antibiotics (big mistake), seeing a urologist, and getting my kidneys checked via ultrasound. The antibiotics didn't cure the discomfort, the urologist couldn't even find bacteria in my urine, and my kidneys checked out fine. The only thing that finally helped was when I discontinued my all meat and fat diet and took a month off from tea. I suspect that my bladder is just getting irritated by the ketones. Has anyone else experienced this? Any idea how to treat this? Continue reading >>

My Ketogenic Diet Has Worked For Me For 4 Years.

My Ketogenic Diet Has Worked For Me For 4 Years.

This last week I have had some fasting BGLs that are elevated for no apparent reason. Last night I came to the realisation that I might have a UTI. A couple of strong pain killers helped me eventually. I headed into the A&E as it is the weekend and my GP's practice is closed. The triage nurse took my info asking all the relevant questions and asked if I was prone to UTI's. I told her that I had had one. She asked in what time frame that was and I said in my lifetime so she was happy with that. She agreed that I probably did have a UTI and sent me off to produce a urine sample. Didn't mention diabetes as she didn't ask. A doctor eventually called me in and asked all the questions that the triage nurse had laboriously entered in the computer on my records. I told him about my elevated BGLs and he asked what they were 6.2, 6.3 and asked if I was a diabetic. He asked what medication I had taken and I told him about the pain killers I took. He asked what diabetes meds I was on and I told him that I wasn't. He again asked me and we clarified I was on no meds for any condition. He agreed to prescribe an antibiotic and asked what I had last time. I guessed a name and he said that was what he would recommend so I hope that was it. He went off to find my urine test results and came back and informed me that there were ketones present in my results. (YESSSSSSSSSS. I had confirmation that that was where I wanted to be!! Didn't tell him that... too difficult to explain) He then said that he wanted a check done on my BGLs and if they were under 8 I could go home!!!!! I told him that they would be and if they were anywhere near 8 I would have to check in! The nurse came to do my blood and he triumphantly told me I was a legend, 4.9. I told him that was what I expected and was shown th Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones may not be on your mind when beginning a weight-loss diet, but if you plan to follow a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet plan, they should be. While many popular low-carb commercial diet plans encourage your body to shift into a fat-burning state called ketosis, the production of ketones that results can alter your urine chemistry and raise the risk of kidney stones. Understanding the risks to your kidneys can help you decide whether the weight loss promises of a high-protein, low-carb diet are worth it. Video of the Day Kidney stones develop when a hard mass of crystals develops in the urinary tract. Kidney stones are often extremely painful, especially when they pass through the thin ureter to exit the body. There are a few different types of kidney stones, each made up of different materials. The cause of kidney stones remains unknown, but some people seem to be more prone to developing them than others, so there may be a hereditary component. Ketones are compounds formed by the breakdown of fat as the body shifts from burning carbohydrates to burning fat for fuel. During a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, ketones become the main source of energy in the body. After a few days or weeks on this type of diet, the brain begins to use ketones as fuel instead of glucose. However, when too many ketones build up in the bloodstream, the pH of the urine changes from neutral to slightly acidic, which can put stress on the kidneys and potentially raise the risk of developing kidney stones. A 2002 study published in the "American Journal of Kidney Diseases" found that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet raised the acidity of the blood over a six-week period, a condition known to contribute to kidney stones. The study found up to a 90-percent increase in acid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Can A Uti Cause Protein And Blood In Urine

Can A Uti Cause Protein And Blood In Urine

Can A Uti Cause Protein And Blood In Urine - Peeing bloodblood urineno painwhat , Hi, do you remember doing any exercises recently? there could be several causes for the blood in urine - urinary tract infection being the most probable and common. What blood urine (hematuria) males & females, Get information about blood in urine (hematuria) in males and females. learn the causes of blood in urine and when the symptom may indicate a uti. some people. Blood urine (hematuria) - symptoms - mayo clinic, Seeing blood in your urine can be alarming. while in many instances the cause is harmless, blood in urine (hematuria) can indicate a serious disorder. blood that you. What trace blood urine - tips tricks, What does a trace of blood in urine mean - what does a trace of blood in urine mean? hematuria. if you have hematuria (h), you need to find its cause. first have a. Urinary tract infections overview - verywell., A urinary tract infection (uti) is an infection that occurs when bacteria invade the urinary tract system. while the majority of utis are not serious, they can often. Uti, yeast infection, cloudy urine, smells eggs, You can get teststrips at the drugstore that will show if you have any white blood cells or blood in your urine. either that, or you can just bring a urine sample in. Protein urine. dangerous? , Foamy urine or bubbly urine can be a sign of too much protein in your urine. your body is not breaking down the proteins efficiently. protein reacts with the air to. Urinary tract infection - lab tests online, A urinary tract infection (uti) can occur in one or more parts of the urinary tract, such as the bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (pyelonephritis).. Natural home remedies kidney stones pain: treatment, Causes of kidney stones. there is ofte Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones are a known potential side effect of the ketogenic diet. Exogenous ketone supplements are a novel technology, so it is currently unknown if it could cause a similar problem, but it is possible. Clinically, potassium citrate is used to help decrease the risk of kidney stones (See here: including those that occur with the ketogenic diet. Potassium citrate is available commercially; however, as always, consumers should consult with their physicians before taking any supplements. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet In The Treatment Of Infections Of The Urinary Tract

The Ketogenic Diet In The Treatment Of Infections Of The Urinary Tract

Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.2M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Continue reading >>

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

The low carb lifestyle is known to sculpt some serious fat off your body. Many followers of the keto diet experience rapid weight loss, low hunger levels, and good energy levels. Since you cut out most of the high sugar foods, controlling your calories becomes a breeze. Sounds like an easy plan to success, right? Those who joined the ketogenic army can attest that the early weight loss comes with a toll. The first week of low carb living can be daunting, both mentally and physically. As your brain and body are adapting to a life without glucose, you may become outright miserable. Don’t go shoving cake down your neck just yet – the misery passes. To have an idea what you’ll go through, check out these common side effects that most go through when switching to a keto diet. Usually they only last for the first few days to a week, but preparing yourself for what might come will always help. Mental and Physical Fogginess The first major sign – coming 2 or 3 days into your ketogenic transition – will be the fogginess. You’re brain likes to take it easy and it if had a choice, would run on only glucose. As your body is switching from glucose to ketones as its main source of energy, your body will continue to burn the last stores of glycogen. This results in a foggy haze that might make it hard to concentrate. You might find yourself staring into space or feeling lethargic, but have no fear – it will pass. Headaches might pound at your door, nausea can pit in your stomach, muscle cramps can ruin your day and irritability can spark arguments, but knowing this can help you plan. Switch your diet in the middle of the week, so you will have the weekend to fully rest and recover from your transition. What we suggest is to go super low carb for the first week, which mea Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Urinary Tract Infection

Everything You Need To Know About Urinary Tract Infection

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection from microbes. These are organisms that are too small to be seen without a microscope. Most UTIs are caused by bacteria, but some are caused by fungi and in rare cases by viruses. UTIs are among the most common infections in humans. A UTI can happen anywhere in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Most UTIs only involve the urethra and bladder, in the lower tract. However, UTIs can involve the ureters and kidneys, in the upper tract. Although upper tract UTIs are more rare than lower tract UTIs, they’re also usually more severe. Symptoms of a UTI depend on what part of the urinary tract is infected. Lower tract UTIs affect the urethra and bladder. Symptoms of a lower tract UTI include: burning with urination increased frequency of urination without passing much urine increased urgency of urination bloody urine cloudy urine urine that looks like cola or tea urine that has a strong odor pelvic pain in women rectal pain in men Upper tract UTIs affect the kidneys. These can be potentially life threatening if bacteria move from the infected kidney into the blood. This condition, called urosepsis, can cause dangerously low blood pressure, shock, and death. Symptoms of an upper tract UTI include: pain and tenderness in the upper back and sides chills fever nausea vomiting Treatment of UTIs depends on the cause. Your doctor will be able to determine which organism is causing the infection from the test results used to confirm the diagnosis. In most cases, the cause is bacteria. UTIs caused by bacteria are treated with antibiotics. In some cases, viruses or fungi are the causes. Viral UTIs are treated with medications called antivirals. Often, the antiviral cidofovir is Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

Your Diet May Be Causing Your Urinary Tract Infections

Your Diet May Be Causing Your Urinary Tract Infections

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Tough-to-treat urinary tract infections (UTI) that are resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. Now, in a new study looking at human urine published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers say they’ve discovered why some people are more prone than others to the infections. Intriguingly, diet may have something to do with it. Early on in an infection, cells produce a protein called siderocalin that blocks bacterial growth, including the growth of E. coli that often causes UTIs, says Jeffrey P. Henderson, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and senior author of the study. (It does this by keeping iron away from the bacteria, which need it to thrive.) The researchers wanted to see how the protein worked differently in various samples of urine at restricting the growth of E. coli, so they analyzed the urine from about 50 men and women. “We found, kind of to our surprise, that there was a really wide range between individuals and how well this protein worked, just depending on that individual’s urinary composition,” says Henderson. Two common factors emerged in urine that had a better ability to resist bacterial growth: it had a high pH—one that’s more alkaline, in other words—and higher levels of certain metabolites formed by gut microbes. That metabolite isn’t made from human cells, Henderson says; rather, they come from the diet or are metabolized by bacterial cells from dietary sources. “It looks like this protein that’s part of your immune system is able to use metabolites in the diet as grips to hold onto iron and keep it away from pathogenic bacteria,” Henderson says. In some people, that system is set up really well, he says, but i Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that grows within the urinary tract - anywhere from the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and through to the urethra. Urinary tract infections can be a particular problem for people with diabetes as sugar in the urine makes for a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. This is supported by data from the American Diabetes Association (a report at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the ADA), which showed 9.4% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes had a UTI compared to only 5.7% of people without diabetes. [92] What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Urinary tract infections are characterised by two types: Lower urinary tract infections or Cystitis - bacterial infection affecting the bladder and the tube that transports urine from your bladder out of your body via the penis or vagina (urethra) Upper urinary tract infections or Pyelonephritis - bacterial infection affecting the kidneys and the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) Lower urinary tract infection (affecting the bladder and urethra): Pain or stinging when passing urine (dysuria) Persistent feeling of the need to urinate Cloudy and foul-smelling urine Strong and bad smell of urine Abdominal pan (stomach pain) Back pain Blood in the urine (hematuria) Upper urinary tract infection (affecting the kidneys and ureters): High temperature / fever Constant shivering Vomiting Back pain Pain in your side (flank pain) How serious are urinary tract infections? Some people may find themselves particularly prone to UTIs. Upper urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis) are the more serious of the two. In this case the bacteria have managed to reach the tubes connecting the bladder (ureters) to the kidneys. If the bacterial infection reaches the kidney Continue reading >>

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