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Can Ketosis Cause Nausea

Why Do I Feel So Nauseated On The Ketogenic Diet?

Why Do I Feel So Nauseated On The Ketogenic Diet?

This is a pretty common ‘side effect’ of starting a ketogenic lifestyle. It usually has to do with introducing too much fat initially as your body is not used to consuming it. The majority of times it has to do with consuming too much MCT oil or a variety of medium chain fatty acids. Try these few hacks to improve the outcome: Try decreasing the amount you are consuming of MCT to 1–2 teaspoons per day initially and gradually titrate up Increase fluid intake (water) and salt (salt tablets or bullion cubes work well) Wait it out. Eventually your body will become used to fat and once you are keto/fat adapted you will notice the benefits. ***a word of caution on using liquid drinks to increase fat percentage intake*** A common difficulty a lot of my clients have experienced in the past relates to consuming too many calories in the form of bulletproof coffee or some liquid variety. At the end of the day if you consume 2000 calories as fat that will lead to satiety but not necessarily weight loss. If you stall or plateau try cutting back on these types of calories to help with real fat loss. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

If you are considering the ketogenic diet or have already started down this carb-free road, you may wonder what you can expect. Here’s the thing. Ketosis looks different for everyone, but I will share many of the most common symptoms with you today. If something other than what’s listed here is happening to you, just do a quick Google search for that symptom and keto. You should be able to find what you’re looking for! The Early Signs: The early signs of ketosis vary from person to person. The biggest impact on how quickly you notice the symptoms of ketosis will have a lot to do with how you ate before you started the diet. If your diet was very high carb, you might get hit pretty quickly and furiously with what we like to call the “Keto Flu.” This can last anywhere from 3 days to a week or more. Once your body has adapted to burning ketones for energy instead of glucose, you’ll be golden so don’t give up! Here’s what you can expect within the first 2-3 days of starting the Ketogenic Diet: Fatigue & Weakness (lack of concentration) Headaches Metallic taste or sweet taste in your mouth (I experienced this, and it tasted like blood in my mouth) Lightheaded / Dizzy upon standing Heightened Thirst Hunger / Sweet or Carb Cravings Dry Mouth possibly paired with “Keto Breath.” Stomach Discomfort / Mild Nausea / Cramping Trouble Sleeping or Staying Asleep (early waking) Water weight loss (perhaps an excessive loss of weight within the first two weeks) Frequent Urination Allergies or cold like symptoms may flair up For the ladies: Period issues: You may experience a longer, shorter, earlier, later period because of Keto. Seriously it causes all of that. Each woman is different, and I have experienced every one of those issues with my period since starting ket Continue reading >>

Keto Flu Symptoms, Low Carb Headache And Fatigue In Ketosis

Keto Flu Symptoms, Low Carb Headache And Fatigue In Ketosis

I would have it as a guess that more than half of the people I have seen on the Ketogenic Diet have experienced to some degree what is known as Keto Flu or Low Carb Flu. Mostly a feeling of fatigue, slight headaches or nausea overcomes them. The symptoms of Keto Flu / Low Carb Flu usually occurs in the first two weeks of a person beginning a ketogenic diet and entering into ketosis. They can come and go if you’re not getting the right nutrition. Share the Infographic above on your site! The other half follow what is recommended and replenish themselves with essential minerals and electrolytes that are being depleted. These electrolytes are flushed from their bodies as they rid themselves of the water retention and sodium their old high carb diets made them hang on to. What are the symptoms of Keto Flu or Low Carb Flu? The symptoms of Keto Flu as you begin to restrict your carbs and enter into a state of ketosis varies from individual to individual. They differ in duration and severity, dependant on what high fat, low carb foods you include in your ketogenic diet and their mineral content. The Most Common Keto Flu Symptoms Experienced are: What is known as a Low Carb Headache, Diarrhea Fatigue Weakness Nausea Dizziness Low Blood Pressure Brain Fog What Causes Keto Flu / Low Carb Flu, Fatigue, Headache and other Symptoms of Ketosis? Firstly I’d like to bring this away from the technicalities of minerals and nutrients for a second and get people thinking laterally about what they are embarking upon. Essentially when going into a Ketogenic Diet, Ketosis or most Low Carb Diets, we are breaking an addiction. Most western populations are drawn to carbohydrates, or put even more simply sugar! Sugar gives us an instant rush and satisfaction as it flows through our bodies, co Continue reading >>

Keto Flu – Why It Happens, Symptoms, Relief

Keto Flu – Why It Happens, Symptoms, Relief

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Feeling flu like symptoms after switching to a low carb diet? Learn the symptoms of keto flu and how you can cope with the symptoms! Having flu-like symptoms when starting a low carb diet is common. The condition is not as bad as the name entails because isn’t a sickness. And, it is certainly not contagious. Keto flu describes the condition you may feel when you first start a very low carb ketogneic diet. Some people may think that the symptoms felt are bad and that it is all because of the diet. Fortunately, this assumption is incorrect. Keto Flu Symptoms The common symptoms felt with keto flu include: Fatigue Headaches Cough Irritability Nausea These symptoms correlate very closely with real flu like symptoms. They arise when your body is going through withdrawal from sugar. If you experience flu-like symptoms after moving to a ketogenic diet, it shows that your body was dependent on sugar and is craving it. What Causes Keto Flu? When most people think of withdrawal, they typically link it to drug addictions and recovering drug abusers. Withdrawing from sugar is not so different from cocaine or heroine. When you eat sugar, the same response goes off in your head as it would with cocaine. Your body feels euphoria and pumps out dopamine. This a chemical in your brain that makes you feel happy. You may not be aware but your body subconsciously is aware of what makes it happy. Thus, when your sugar levels are low your b Continue reading >>

How To Get Rid Of Keto Flu

How To Get Rid Of Keto Flu

You’re unbelievably tired, have crazy intense nausea, and a headache. You just started a Ketogenic Diet, and you’d bet your right arm that this new diet is making you feel this awful. Removing carbohydrates from your diet rapidly, like with a Ketogenic, Low Carb, or Paleo Diet, may very well be the reason that you feel like you legitimately have the flu, and that’s why it’s called Keto Flu. Ready to learn how to get rid of Keto Flu? Read on for my best tips: Keto Flu is a symptom of starting a low-carb diet. Any low carb diet (not just Keto) such as LCHF, Paleo, Whole30, or even Atkins can produce the Keto Flu. The symptoms you’re feeling are caused by your body being used to using the carbohydrates you eat for fuel. When you stop eating carbs, your body “panics” for a few days until your switch over to Ketosis: burning stored and dietary fat for fuel, rather than carbohydrates. The good news is that it takes most people’s bodies only a few days to fully move int Ketosis, so while your Keto Flu symptoms might make you feel awful, they should subside in 2-3 days. In some regard, Keto Flu actually dehydrates you: Your body stores water in it’s muscles by binding water to carbohydrates, so when you stop eating carbs, your body starts to use those stored carbs in your muscles, flushing the water attached to those carbs out of your body as a side effect. I’ll tell you how to keep from getting dehydrated during the transition into Ketosis in just a moment. If you have Keto Flu, don’t panic, because there are ways to get rid of it. 1. Eat More High-Quality Fats Since your body can no longer get it’s energy from carbohydrates (and the sugars it turns carbs into), your body still needs energy and can find it in the form of dietary far. So if you eat more Continue reading >>

What Is Keto Flu ?

What Is Keto Flu ?

So What is Keto Flu Anyways!? I posted this What is Keto Flu article below back in the summer of 2013 when I had no idea what I was doing or what keto flu was. All I knew is that I was sick as a dog! I’ve learned so much since then and so many people manage to find this article, so I thought I should update it with the solutions that work! The Keto flu is also called Ketosis Flu, Ketogenic Flu, Induction Flu and Carb Flu depending on what groups you hang out in. It normally is what happens after your first couple of days without carbs. Not to every single person, but most people go through some sort of carb withdrawal and/or carb detox. What actually causes the Keto Flu Symptoms? Keto flu happens when our bodies shift from glucose or sugar burning mode to fat burning mode. It is basically an electrolyte imbalance. On a keto diet we need more magnesium, potassium and sodium. Luckily, this is a pretty easy problem to solve and I wish I had known about this 3 years ago! Can You Stop Keto Flu ? You know, for some of us, the keto flu is something we just have to go through for a few days. Think of it as a detox because bottom line, that is what is happening. You are detoxing from sugar, carbs, wheat, all those things that are holding you back from optimal health. But even though you likely can’t stop keto flu, you sure can minimize the symptoms! Drink lots of salty chicken broth. Use a magnesium supplement. You will be amazed at how helpful this will be! I recommend using Lo Salt or any similar blend that has potassium and sodium. My other go to remedy is a nightly drink of Calm. This is a magnesium drink that I swear by and I still use it almost every night. Not only does Calm prevent leg cramps but it also keeps me regular, which can be an issue for low carbers. It is Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

How To Cure Keto Flu

How To Cure Keto Flu

So, you’ve started a new Ketogenic nutrition plan; you’re working out, eating right, and waiting for those gains your buddies have been raving about, and then it strikes – Keto flu! Instead of feeling on top of the world and ready to fight tigers, you’re suddenly crippled with headaches, nausea, fatigue, and brain fog – leading you to wonder why you have the flu in summer. Keto flu gets its name due to its strong resemblance to regular flu; and while not everyone gets affected, there is a chance during Ketosis you might experience a brief bought of feeling under the weather. The trick is to learn how to identify Keto flu, as opposed to the traditional flu and understanding when to take preventative measures to stop you from feeling down. Let’s look at what causes this annoying condition and what you can do to rest and recover, and stop it from happening to you next! First things first; Keto flu is not contagious and is not actually a real disease. It’s a term widely used in the Keto community to describe what some people believe to be the side effects of carb withdrawal. As this flu strikes when you first go into Ketosis, the idea is that Ketogenic flu is caused by your bodies need or perceived threat of running out of fuel. People can experience symptoms such as a headache, fatigue, and nausea, for a few days or weeks, and symptoms will ease as you become Keto-adapted, and your body learns how to use fat for fuel. If your flu symptoms return or last for a long time, it is always worth consulting with a Doctor. The good news is this is a worthy fight and one you can easily win with some easy conditioning. Here is how to prevent Keto flu: Hydrate! The Ketogenic diet is a diuretic diet, and you need to exaggerate your water intake to account for this change Continue reading >>

All About The “low-carb Flu”

All About The “low-carb Flu”

What is “Low carb flu”? If you’ve ever dramatically reduced your carbohydrate intake, you might have felt it already: it’s that first few days of headaches, brain fog, crankiness, and constant, dragging exhaustion. At some point, you know the magic is going to happen and you’ll start feeling like a human being again, but the transition period is really rough. It feels like having the flu (hence the name), only you’re not sick; you’re just cutting carbs. Low-carb flu can include any of the following: You feel fuzzy and foggy, like your brain just isn’t working right. You might have a pounding or throbbing headache. You’re exhausted, cranky, and irritable for no reason. Going to the gym feels like an insurmountable challenge. If you do make it, your performance is completely down the drain. You’re ravenously hungry, tearing into everything in sight. You’re craving anything with carbs – bagels, pasta, pizza, sandwiches, mashed potatoes, candy… So what gives? Isn’t Paleo supposed to make you feel better, not worse? Yes it is – and yes it will, eventually. But for some people, there’s an initial period of adaptation while your body switches tracks. Here’s how it works: At any given time, your body can be burning either fat or carbohydrates for energy, but given a choice, it’ll start with carbs. If you eat a mixed meal (say, a potato with butter), you’ll burn the carbs first, and then start working on the fat. Metabolic flexibility is the ability to switch back and forth between carbs and fat for energy without a problem. This is how healthy humans are set up. If you eat a potato with butter, get up, and go along with your day, you’re metabolically flexible. First you burn through the carbohydrates in the potato; then you burn through t Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

The Dreaded Keto Flu

The Dreaded Keto Flu

For all the excellent benefits of the ketogenic lifestyle, getting there can be a physically rough road. The primary reason for this is what is known as the “keto flu”. Almost everyone who has changed their life to the healthy ketogenic lifestyle has had to deal with the keto flu, and some have had a worse deal than others. Background The keto flu is the common name for the induction phase of ketogenesis. That means it’s the period of time when your body is getting used to the changes you have made to what you eat. When you change what you eat, you change everything about how your body operates and functions. Inside your gut (where close to 70% of your immune system lives) are billions of bacteria, and they are all battling for dominance. If your diet consists of highly refined carbs, the types of bacteria that thrive in your gut (e. coli, h. pylori, candida a, etc.) will be inflammatory and detrimental to your immune system. By changing your diet to be high in fat, those same bacteria die off rapidly, because they don’t have their preferred energy source. This massive bacteria death has consequences. These consequences are typically: Diarrhea Headaches Nausea Lack of mental focus and clarity Fatigue In short: You feel like you have the flu. That’s because, in a way, you do. Your immune system is taking a beating when you make the change, because it has grown accustomed to the way things have been. But once you get through the induction phase, and you start to feel better, your immune system will be several times stronger and more efficient. That’s one of the reason that Ketovangelists don’t get sick (and when they do, it’s not nearly as bad as it could have been). Changing Fuel Sources The best way to think about what you’re doing to your body is to i Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

When starting a ketogenic diet, some people experience initial side effects from carbohydrate restriction known as ‘keto flu.’ These symptoms can have some mild and potentially severe effects on the body. While the condition is popularly known as keto flu, people also commonly refer to it as induction flu, low carb flu, and Atkins flu. This article will explain what it is, why it happens, and the best strategies for avoiding or beating it. What is the Keto Flu? Firstly, it is not the real flu. It just shares the name because it has several of the same symptoms. Coming from a high carbohydrate diet, the body is well-adapted to using glucose for fuel. However, when restricting carbohydrate, the supply of glucose falls before the body has adapted to burning fat for fuel. In other words, your body is in ketosis but not fully keto-adapted. If you are curious about this, you can find out your level of ketosis by using ketone strips. The liver and gall-bladder need time to upregulate the number of fat-burning enzymes to burn larger amounts of fat efficiently. Severely restricting carbohydrate is a massive change to the way the body works and your body needs time to adjust to the metabolic changes. When Does it Start? There is no exact timeframe, but symptoms may appear as quickly as 10-12 hours after starting to restrict carbohydrate. For some people, it might be slightly earlier or later. Of course, there are also people who won’t experience the dreaded keto flu at all. How Long Does it Last? Based on anecdotes, this induction flu lasts somewhere between two days and about two weeks. The worst symptoms appear in the first few days and then taper off. Regarding the intensity of the symptoms, this likely depends on the previous diet, hormonal state, and prior carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Ketosis Signs & Appetite

Ketosis Signs & Appetite

Ketosis is a metabolic condition in which the body begins breaking down fats, thus releasing carbon fragments known as ketones from the liver. The liver produces ketones as a byproduct of breaking down fatty acids. When your body is in a state of ketosis, your appetite is typically reduced. For this reason, some diets -- such as a low-carbohydrate diet -- aim to trigger a state of ketosis in your body. If too many ketones are released, however, this can have harmful consequences. Video of the Day Having diabetes, not eating or eating a low carbohydrate diet can induce ketosis. This is because ketosis occurs when your body does not have or is not able to use glycogen, which is the body’s stored form of carbohydrate. Because your body does not have glycogen, it switches to its next option: burning fat. This fat releases ketones in the body, inducing a state of ketosis. Because ketones are sweet by nature, one sign of ketosis is fruity-smelling breath. Nausea, fatigue and water and muscle loss are other symptoms. Another sign is an initial boost in appetite, followed by a loss of appetite. This is because when ketosis is induced, this signals the body that it is in a state of starvation. The liver and stomach send signals to the brain that it is starving, and keeps you from feeling satiated. However, over time the body becomes accustomed to its fat burning mode and adapts. Your hunger is then reduced after about a two- to four-week time period. If you are trying to lose weight, inducing a state of ketosis and reducing your appetite can be beneficial. This is because ketosis does not completely reduce your appetite, but instead helps to reduce your cravings for food that can sometimes lead you to overeat. The heart, brain and other muscle tissues “prefer” to burn keto Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

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