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Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Pain

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Learn How To Cure Kidney Disease & Improve Kidney Function Naturally in 2 Months Without Dialysis or Surgery. 100% Guaranteed By Thousands People From Worldwide. And Approved by Doctors and Nephrologists. CLICK HERE http://www.Kidney-Disease-Solution.be... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- acute renal failure causes of kidney disease causes of kidney failure chronic kidney disease chronic kidney disease symptoms chronic renal failure dialysis end stage renal disease kidney kidney dialysis kidney disease kidney disease symptoms kidney failure kidney failure symptoms kidney failure treatment kidney function kidney infection kidney pain kidney problem symptoms kidney problems renal disease renal failure signs of kidney disease signs of kidney failure stage 3 kidney disease stage 4 kidney disease symptoms of kidney disease symptoms of kidney failure symptoms of kidney problems what causes kidney failure In this video, we will show you about 10 possible signs and symptoms that you may have kidney disease. 1. You're more tired, have less energy or are having trouble concentrating. A severe decrease in kidney function can lead to a buildup of toxins and impurities in the blood. This can cause people to feel tired, weak and can make it hard to concentrate. Another complication of kidney disease is anemia, which can cause weakness and fatigue. 2. You're having trouble sleeping. When the kidneys aren't filtering properly, toxins stay in the blood rather than leaving the body through the urine. This can make it difficult to sleep. There is also a link between obesity and chronic kidney disease, and sleep apnea is more common in those with chronic kidney disease, compared with the general population. 3. You have dry and itchy skin. Healthy kidneys do many important jobs. They remove wastes and extra fluid from your body, help make red blood cells, help keep bones strong and work to maintain the right amount of minerals in your blood. Dry and itchy skin can be a sign of the mineral and bone disease that often accompanies advanced kidney disease, when the kidneys are no longer able to keep the right balance of minerals and nutrients in your blood. 4. You feel the need to urinate more often. If you feel the need to urinate more often, especially at night, this can be a sign of kidney disease. When the kidneys filters are damaged, it can cause an increase in the urge to urinate. Sometimes this can also be a sign of a urinary infection or enlarged prostate in men. 5. You see blood in your urine. Healthy kidneys typically keep the blood cells in the body when filtering wastes from the blood to create urine, but when the kidney's filters have been damaged, these blood cells can start to "leak" out into the urine. In addition to signaling kidney disease, blood in the urine can be indicative of tumors, kidney stones or an infection. 6. Your urine is foamy. Excessive bubbles in the urine, especially those that require you to flush several times before they go away, indicate protein in the urine. This foam may look like the foam you see when scrambling eggs, as the common protein found in urine, albumin, is the same protein that is found in eggs. 7. You're experiencing persistent puffiness around your eyes. Protein in the urine is an early sign that the kidneys filters have been damaged, allowing protein to leak into the urine. This puffiness around your eyes can be due to the fact that your kidneys are leaking a large amount of protein in the urine, rather than keeping it in the body. 8. Your ankles and feet are swollen. Decreased kidney function can lead to sodium retention, causing swelling in your feet and ankles. Swelling in the lower extremities can also be a sign of heart disease, liver disease and chronic leg vein problems. 9. You have a poor appetite. This is a very general symptom, but a buildup of toxins resulting from reduced kidney function can be one of the causes. 10. Your muscles are cramping. Electrolyte imbalances can result from impaired kidney function. For example, low calcium levels and poorly controlled phosphorus may contribute to muscle cramping. https://youtu.be/2KnD9MzCzsM

Is The Current Rise In Kidney Disease Due To Our Over-consumption Of Animal Source Foods?

I periodically get asked about concerns regarding the growing rates of kidney disease and concerns about kidney health in general in relation to a diet based in animal source foods. The worry is that consuming animal protein might somehow put a strain on kidneys and even lead to kidney damage over time. Here are the facts: In the United States, approximately one in three adults aged 65 years and older currently has chronic kidney disease. Certain mainstream sources are determined to find every which way to blame and further vilify animal source foods in this equation (and innumerable others), while extolling the supposed virtues of a plant-based diet. This is a pervasive misinformation trend, and one that I take on in my newest book, Primal Fat Burner. For starters, I don’t see the rise in kidney disease as necessarily being unrelated to the rise in metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the result of insulin resistance (which, in turn, is overwhelmingly the result of excess carbohydrate consumption—not fat or protein consumption). As my friend, Ron Rosedale, MD has aptly pointed out (and I’m paraphrasing somewhat), the development of obesity, in some respects, is technica Continue reading >>

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  1. redheadmommy

    I am wondering if anybody experience kidney pain and generally kidney problems on paleo/primal especially in keto? I restarted primal maybe 6-7 months ago after my 2nd baby. As I was breastfeeding I was started with relatively higher carb version 175 g carb and slowly dropped the carbs first to 150 g, than 125 g , than 100 g than 85 g and I am around 65-75g ( net 40-50g) since November 1st when I started Whole 30. Maybe because of breastfeeding, ketostix started to show trace amount around 100-110g carb level, and constantly medium level since I am below 85 g, and now sometimes shows large amount of ketones. I am eating around 100 g (+/-15g) protein, which is really medium and not high level as I am 205lb and LBM is 125 lb, and I eat this or higher level than this for years.
    About a week or 10 days ago( 1 week into whole 30), I started to have some minor dull back pain. First I didn't make much of it, as I though uncomfortable sleep or carrying too much my 20+ lb baby or sometimes lift my 45 lb kindergardener is the source. Over the last week the pain became stronger and stronger , and now it is really clear that it is not my back, but actually my kidneys. I used to have lots of kidney troubles as small child, but had a urethra surgery when I was almost 8 yrs old, and never had any problems with my kidneys for the past 30 years not even during pregnancies. In any case initially I was a bit uneasy about the whole ketosis thing due to my past kidney troubles, but weight loss was not really happening, so I went for it. I have a drs appointment tomorrow and I am not sure what to tell my Dr about my eating habits.
    We all know that paleo and especially keto lifestyle is not really supported by general practitioners. If I tell my dr about paleo and keto, I am sure she would tell me to stop regardless if it is actually related or not. But actually it may be the cause of my kidney problems.
    I would appreciate any advice or experience you can share.

  2. TriLifter

    No clue--I hope you get some answers!

  3. Dragonwolf

    Some thoughts:
    1. Try to find a new doctor. As you stated yourself, she's probably not going to support Paleo/keto and will likely jump to blame that instead of looking for the true underlying cause. Protein is generally the culprit in kidney issues that stem from macronutrients, not fat. As long as your protein didn't increase, it shouldn't really be a factor.
    2. Since you have a history of kidney troubles, it is possible the protein amount you're eating is too much for you now that your diet has changed, especially if you're not doing strength training (and actually putting that protein to good use). It might be worth trying to cut down on it. Make sure you're drinking enough water, too.
    3. A quick search on keto and kidney pain turns up some comments from people that too much starch aggravates their kidney issues. It might be worth revisiting the source of your carbs and try keeping them to non-starchy sources and maybe dropping them a little more.
    4. Kidney pain also has other sources, such as kidney stones. These are often build ups of minerals (most often, calcium). They're painful, but for the most part, can be passed with no long term damage. Just make sure to drink plenty of water. ( http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kidney-stones/DS00282/DSECTION=causes ) Also, see if you're taking in too much calcium. One of the biggest fears people (especially women) have when going Paleo is the amount of calcium in the diet due to the reduction or elimination of dairy products. Dr. Cordain has mentioned in some of his books that calcium intake isn't as important as calcium absorption and the balance between calcium and potassium, and the Paleo diet removes a lot of the compounds that inhibit calcium absorption, and can increase consumption of potassium. So, it might be worth, again, looking at what you're eating (and supplements) and seeing whether you're eating too much calcium.
    5. Are you absolutely sure it's kidney pain? One thing I learned recently is that there's a supporting muscle that runs from the spine, through the pelvic bone, and to the inner thigh. In Yoga at least, it's known as the Psoas muscle and is also the top part of the hip flexors. Mine's injured right now, and lifting anything of enough weight to engage that area is something that aggravates it. The pain, for me, goes deeper than the typical back muscle pain, and isn't helped by the typical muscle pain relief methods, so it's still sometimes difficult for me to believe that it's muscle pain, despite diagnosis from my GP and confirmation from a physical therapist.

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http://kidneydisease.blogstips.org What are the Foods to Avoid with Kidney Stones | Kidney Stones Diet Kidney stones pain symptoms, in the more mild cases, can be inconvenient. In the more severe cases, they can require surgery to remove, with enough pain to induce nausea or vomiting. Foods to avoid with kidney stones include anything high in oxalate, a chemical that contributes to the development of stones in the urinary tract. Dark leafy greens are a leading culprit, but numerous other foods including chocolate, tea, and okra can also be high in oxalate. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidney_... At the same time, it is important to eat a balanced diet, high in calcium, to prevent oxalate absorption, and lots of fluids to keep the urinary tract flushed. Research suggests that a medium protein diet is optimal for people with a history of kidney stones. Health prevention High-oxalate foods to avoid include any dark green leafy vegetables like kale, chard, and spinach; chocolates and teas; peanuts; wheat germ; okra; soy; and sweet potatoes. All of these foods should be eaten in small amounts, and it is important to cook them thoroughly to promote the breakdown of any oxalate they contain. Some foods contain lesser amounts of oxalate and should be eaten in moderation but do not need to be completely avoided. These include fresh fruits, celery, and liver. While fruits and vegetables rank high on the list of foods to avoid with kidney stones, it is not a good idea to cut them out of the diet completely. Many vegetables, like carrots, are perfectly safe to eat, and fruits can have varying amounts of oxalate; apples and bananas, for example, are good foods choices. Fluids can include water, herbal teas, and juices. Increasing potassium and calcium intake will also help for people with kidney stones. Yogurt, beans, almonds, cheese, and sardines can all be good additions to the diet. The calcium and potassium will bind to the oxalate and limit absorption through the gut. This reduces the amount available for kidney stone formation. Animal protein is not specifically on the list of foods to avoid, but it should be eaten moderately, as higher protein diets appear to have a link with the development of stones. Patients evaluating a list of foods to avoid with kidney stones may feel overwhelmed by the extent of changes they need to make to their diets.Easy prevention. Related tags: healthy foods for kidney stones best foods for kidney stones diet for kidney stones foods to avoid for kidney stones signs of a kidney stone kidney stone home remedy avoid foods for diabetes avoid foods that are high in purines avoid foods to lose weight kidney disease symptoms Visit Website. Click Here http://kidneydisease.blogstips.org What are the Foods to Avoid with Kidney Stones | Kidney Stones Diet

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. New guidelines recommend people who have had a kidney stone increase their fluid intake so they have at least two liters of urine per day Increasing water consumption could decrease your risk of kidney stone recurrence by at least half By Dr. Mercola In the 1970s, less than 4 percent of Americans had suffered from kidney stones. By the 1990s, this had increased to more than 5 percent. Today, with rates continuing to rise, kidney stones will impact one in 10 US adults at some point during their lives1 -- usually between the ages of 20 and 50. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing lasting damage, but the pain during passing can be excruciating. Kidney stones are also sometimes associated with lower back pain, stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, and chills. Generally, the larger the stone, the more pain and symptoms it will cause. Sometimes aggressive treatments are needed to clear the stones, and each year, more than half a million people go to US emergency rooms due to kidney stones.2 Once you've had them, your risk of recurrence increases. About 35 percent to 50 percent of people will have a Continue reading >>

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  1. Niquie

    Just wondering if anyone gets dull and burning pain in one of their kidneys when they are in ketosis? I've been going really great this week on induction (second time over )but I have an annoying dull pain and burn in my right side and mid to lower back.
    I've also started jogging so I don't know if its muscular but when it got bad this evening, I was reaching a dark purple on the tester strips which I have never had at all since I originally started Atkins last Feb.
    Just wondering if anyone has had similar problem and don't worry - I will go to the Doc!
    Appreciate any input you guys might have.

  2. anthonyc

    how much water do you drink per day

  3. Niquie

    On average about 4-6 glasses a day along with 2 herbal teas and 3 decaff coffees. Something else - I seem to be tasting salt in everything, what is up with that? I cant even stomach a piece of bacon cause the salt is making me sick. Yuk !!! ( I normally lurv salt - in moderation of course)

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Despite the fact that there are vaccines that are very effective against most types of pneumonia, every year millions get sick from the disease and about 40,000 die. At HealthConnection.TV, UT Health Northeast physician assistant Gerry Brown answers questions and clears up confusion regarding pneumonia vaccine.

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

It’s funny how our mental state really affects how we write and what we are interested in. When I wrote the introduction to this piece I was just getting settled into our new place in Santa Fe, NM and was looking at over a month at home to work and write. Then a number of wacky events happened and I’ve been home about 7 days out of the last month and I’ve only made it about 70 pages into Kon-Tiki. Ouch. Now I’m home for 8 days and will then be gone for a project that will take me completely off the grid for nearly 3 weeks. No phone, email…nada. When I sat down to do this kidney piece it was with a mindset that I had a ton of time and could really sink my teeth into it. Now I’m time crunched and anxious that I will get it done at all! Up front here I’d like to thank Mat “The Kraken” Lalonde with his help on some literature for this piece. Any inaccuracies however are my own tomfoolery. If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following: 1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE. 2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage. 3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage. 4-Many kidney issues have either a Continue reading >>

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  1. DebbieMiller1981

    Has anyone else had this? Have been a bit sore on and off doing this diet for last 2.5 weeks and wondered if it's normal and if there's anything to do to make it better?
    I know that ketosis does put stress on the kidneys which is why many people disaprove of VLCDs but I really wanna lose teh rest of the weight so don't want to stop! I am worried I am not doing my kidneys any good though so any advice? Reassurance please?
    I know fi I see my GP, he will just tell me it's because of CD as many drs don't agree with it!
    Thanks in advance xxx

  2. Wabbitt

    Drink plenty of water honey, it helps to flush the kidneys out and should help x

  3. DebbieMiller1981

    I'm already drinking about 4 litres a day but will try for a lil more! eek! Thanks x

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