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Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Pain

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis happens when your body resorts to fat for energy after your stored carbohydrates have been burned out. It often occurs when people fast and exercise. But most commonly, ketosis occurs in people who eat low-carb, high-protein diets, which are also called ketogenic diets. There’s some evidence that ketosis can tax your kidneys, leading to kidney stones and low blood pressure. In diabetics, a variant of ketosis can be fatal. However, a small but growing group of health professionals say ketosis is not the poison you’ve been lead to think it was, and it may be better for you than high-carbohydrate eating. Your specific dietary habits are best advised by your healthcare provider or nutritionist. Video of the Day Ketosis happens when you get a buildup of a substance known as ketones, or ketone bodies in your blood. They are released when your body’s carbohydrate stores run out and you have to break down fat stores for energy. Dieters tend to deliberately cause ketosis because it makes you feel less hungry. However, ketosis also makes you feel tired and sluggish, because as "Medical News Today" reports, ketones aren’t the most efficient source of energy, especially for your brain. Ketosis can also harm your kidneys. Annually, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure in the United States, reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, or NIDDK. The condition is marked by the inability of your kidneys to do their job of eliminating wastes. One treatment for kidney failure is dialysis, a draining and lengthy artificial blood cleansing process. Another option is a kidney transplant. The NIDDK states that the cost of care for patients with kidney failure reached close to $32 billion in 2005. The federal government sub Continue reading >>

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Once upon a time, fat was the enemy of dieters. Nearly every product on the grocery store shelves had its “low-fat” version. Low-fat dressing. Low-fat cheese. Low-fat chips. Low-fat processed meats. Low-fat cookies. Low-fat freezer meals. It didn’t matter if the food itself was terrible for you and completely devoid of any nutrients (or even real food)… as long as it was “low-fat,” it was marketed as healthy for you. It was the way to lose weight for good. But then science begin to show us that fat wasn’t the enemy after all. In fact, eating plenty of healthy fats was the key to optimal health – and even sustainable weight loss. And today we have a diet rapidly growing in popularity that says, “Not only is fat good for you, you should be eating MOSTLY fat.” That’s right, I’m talking about the keto diet. Discover in just 7 short questions why you may be experiencing painful kidney stones and uncover how to return to your normal life. Take The Kidney Quiz Now! As with any unique diet plan, there are those who believe in it religiously and will “proselytize” to anyone who is listening. Then there are those who adamantly believe it to be dangerous. But one concern that pops up quite frequently from those who are skeptical is kidney stones. Can the keto diet encourage the formation of kidney stones? I’m here to help you examine that question. We’re going to learn more about the keto diet and what it does to your body. Then we are going to look at the science behind kidney stones and high-fat/low-carb dieting to see if the keto diet should be embraced or avoided if you suffer from kidney stones. What Is The Keto Diet? Though trendy now, the keto diet is not a new thing. It’s actually been around since the 1920s. In simple terms, the keto diet Continue reading >>

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

As with all medium chain triglycerides, the MCT powder portion of the product will largely be converted to ketones by the liver within a few short hours of consumption. MCT create a readily supply of Ketone production for the liver to use for ketones. The BHB-salt portion should simply be absorbed into the blood as ketones. The BHB supplies another source, which doesn’t require the liver to produce ketones. There is no reason that the ketones produced by the product will affect the kidneys or liver any differently than ketones produced from exogenous fats (such as when eating a ketogenic diet) or ketones produced from stored fats (such as when calorie restricting or losing weight). Exogenous ketone scientific literature does not suggest that either kidney or liver function is negatively affected by ketosis. The major role of the kidneys when it comes to ketones is to excrete excess ketones in the urine. This excretion will likely be highest during the first few days of keto-adaptation (either in eating the keto diet or consuming KETO//OS), but the body will retain more and the tissues will begin to preferentially burn the ketones as consumption continues. The liver is the major site of endogenous ketone production, so taking exogenous ketones with KETO//OS would provide another source besides the liver to make ketones. Remember, KETO//OS and exogenous ketones are a source of calories; so be sure to consider it in your daily goals. KETO//OS and exogenous ketone supplementation is not hard on the liver. Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones are a known potential side effect of the ketogenic diet. Exogenous ketone supplements are a novel technology, so it is currently unknown if it could cause a similar problem, but it is possible. Clinically, potassium citrate is used to help decrease the risk of kidney stones (See here: including those that occur with the ketogenic diet. Potassium citrate is available commercially; however, as always, consumers should consult with their physicians before taking any supplements. Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Ever Woke Up With Their Kidney Area Hurting? ** Updated

Has Anyone Ever Woke Up With Their Kidney Area Hurting? ** Updated

Like you have to go to the bathroom bad. I am wondering if I am stressing them too much. Urine is strong and i am in ketosis. so maybe I am not drinking enough water? Thanks for the responses! It appears that I was VERY VERY dehydrated. I have to constantly remind myself to drink water not tea with cream ;) Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

I remember the first time I learned about the connection between a diet high in sugar and gout, kidney stones and heart disease. I was reading a book (I don’t remember which one) that was laying out the evidence that showed a clear link between sugar consumption and those diseases and it immediately peaked my interest because I didn’t know that gout was still a thing. I had only heard of old French monarchs having it and honestly didn’t know it was still around until just a few weeks before reading that book. Just a few weeks prior to reading that, I learned that my son’s Father in Law had gout and occasional kidney stones and as I read that passage in the book, I thought about calling him and telling him what I read. I decided against it and figured I would bring it up the next time I saw him at church. Unfortunately, before I ever got a chance to say anything to him, he had a heart attack. He’s fine now but I have always felt bad I didn’t immediately make a call. I realize it wouldn’t have done much given how quickly it all happened but still, I should have said something. Since then, probably the most common question I get about the ketogenic diet is whether or not it will cause kidney stones and there is definitely a connection but possibly not how you think. First let’s go over how kidney stones are formed. How Kidney Stones are Formed At one point in time it was thought that uric acid was produced solely from the breakdown of purines found in foods like liver, pork, mushrooms, anchovies, mackerel and dried beans which is why most patients that were susceptible to kidney stones or gout were put on a low purine diet. Unfortunately those diets didn’t work too well and almost always had to be supplemented with additional medications that controlled t Continue reading >>

Eat 1/2 Teaspoon Of Baking Soda Daily And This Happens To Your Kidneys!

Eat 1/2 Teaspoon Of Baking Soda Daily And This Happens To Your Kidneys!

The kidneys are small, only about the size of a fist, but they perform vital functions that play a role in overall health. Each day, the kidneys filter about 120-150 quarts of blood, to produce 1-2 quarts of urine, filtering waste and extra fluid out of the body. The kidneys prevent the buildup of waste in the body, keep electrolyte levels stable, and make hormones that regulate blood pressure, make blood cells, and maintain strong bones. Many factors can lead to kidney damage, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, a disease called glomerulonephritis, which damages the kidney’s filtering units, infections, kidney stones, and overuse of some over-the-counter pain killers. Repairing the kidneys after damage just may lie in a common household item: baking soda. How Does it Work? The endocrine system produces hormones and enzymes to help digest food into safer chemicals that the body can process. The pancreas is usually the organ that produces the majority of sodium bicarbonate to protect the kidneys during digestion. Sometimes, the kidneys will produce additional amounts, depending on the type of food you eat. If your diet includes added sugar, fried foods, fatty foods and other unhealthy choices, the endocrine system can become stressed. Both the pancreas and the kidneys will suffer a significant reduction in their ability to produce sodium bicarbonate effectively. Without sufficient production of bicarbonate, the acids produced during digestion cannot be effectively neutralized, causing kidney damage. In dialysis or other treatments for kidney damage, sodium bicarbonate is one of the most common agents used. A process known as acid buffering aids in the removal of excess fluids and waste material from the bloodstream. Dialysis helps to add sodium bicarbonate Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [4] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% [5]. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Causes are Poorly Understood In the nephrology literature, kidney stones are a rather mysterious condition. Wikipedia has a summary of the reasons offered in the literature for high stone formation on the ketogenic diet [4]: Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons: Excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) occurs due to increased bone demineralisation with acidosis. Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. Hypocitraturia: the urine has an abnormally low concentration of citrate, which normally helps to dissolve free calcium. The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone formation. Many institutions traditionally restricted the water intake of patients on the diet to Continue reading >>

Diets For Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease, Should We Reconsider?

Diets For Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease, Should We Reconsider?

Abstract Here we revisit how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), bringing to the attention of the reader the most recent developments in the field. We will briefly discuss five CKD-induced complications that are substantially improved by dietary manipulation: 1) metabolic acidosis and the progression of CKD; 2) improving the diet to take advantage of the benefits of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) on slowing the progression of CKD; 3) the diet and mineral bone disorders in CKD; 4) the safety of nutritional methods utilizing dietary protein restriction; and 5) evidence that new strategies can treat the loss of lean body mass that is commonly present in patients with CKD. Background When we published a Commentary on how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 2004, we relied heavily on results from older publications [1]. There were two reasons for this decision: firstly, clinicians and investigators working on this topic were still reeling from the negative conclusion of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease trial (MDRD), namely that dietary modification exerted only a minor impact on the progression of CKD [2]. Secondly, there were too few hypotheses addressing how dietary manipulation could affect the development of CKD and its complications [1]. We now revisit this topic because new insights have identified how dietary factors can overcome the development of CKD and its complications, including the progression of CKD. Notably, these insights can be largely traced to results obtained during rigorous studies of patients with CKD rather than intensive investigations of animal models, indicating there is clinical r Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps to Prevent Kidney Stones: In this article, you will find several steps to help prevent kidney stones. The pain of kidney stones is one of the worst possible pains one could possibly experience. While the causes behind kidney stones are not fully understood there is some common nutritional advice that can help prevent these stones from forming. Kidney stones come in a number of different forms. Understanding the type of stone is key to preventing it from re-forming. The most common kidney stones are by far calcium oxalate crystals which account for 80% and uric acid crystals which account for another 5-10% (1). The goal of this article is to help you find the best strategies to work with your unique genetic makeup to prevent kidney stones. We will discover the underlying mechanisms behind kidney stone formation and the unique nutrition and lifestyle tips to follow. Fructose and Kidney Stone Formation: Certain foods that are commonly consumed in the United States promote kidney stone formation. High fructose consumption is linked with an increased excretion of calcium, oxalates and uric acid, which are all associated with increased risk of kidney stones. Research has shown that high fructose diets are at greater risk for kidney stone formation (2, 3, 4) Soft drinks with phosphoric acid significantly increase calcium excretion and kidney stone formation (5). Soft drinks and sweet teas are perhaps the biggest dietary causes of kidney stone formation because they often contain high levels of both fructose and phosphoric acid (6) Major Factors With Kidney Stones: Here are 6 major factors often seen with kidney stone formation Dehydration: This causes low urine volume and less fluid to grab up calcium and other compounds in the urinary system. This is the easiest thin Continue reading >>

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. New guidelines recommend people who have had a kidney stone increase their fluid intake so they have at least two liters of urine per day Increasing water consumption could decrease your risk of kidney stone recurrence by at least half By Dr. Mercola In the 1970s, less than 4 percent of Americans had suffered from kidney stones. By the 1990s, this had increased to more than 5 percent. Today, with rates continuing to rise, kidney stones will impact one in 10 US adults at some point during their lives1 -- usually between the ages of 20 and 50. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing lasting damage, but the pain during passing can be excruciating. Kidney stones are also sometimes associated with lower back pain, stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, and chills. Generally, the larger the stone, the more pain and symptoms it will cause. Sometimes aggressive treatments are needed to clear the stones, and each year, more than half a million people go to US emergency rooms due to kidney stones.2 Once you've had them, your risk of recurrence increases. About 35 percent to 50 percent of people will have another bout with kidney stones within five years unless changes are made.3 What type of changes? According to new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP), one of the simplest strategies you can take is to drink more water. Staying Hydrated Lowers Your Risk of Recurrent Kidney Stones The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. If you aren't drinking enough, your urine will have higher concentrations of substances that can precipitate out and form stones. Specifically, stone-forming chemicals include calcium, oxalate, urate, cysteine, xanthine Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

The ketogenic diet and ketosis are safe. Not only are they safe, but they are useful in helping people with many different conditions. The ketogenic diet has helped cancer patients, people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2), women with polycystic ovary syndrome, people with heart disease, and many others. So, where does the rumor that the ketogenic diet and ketosis may not be safe come from? Well, it starts with ketones. Rumors Spread Like Ketones in an Insulin Deficient Body One of the primary goals of the ketogenic diet is to enter ketosis (a normal metabolic process when ketones are produced for fuel). Ketosis is primarily regulated by the liver, which helps produce enough ketones to meet the body’s needs. However, ketone production can get out of hand when insulin is deficient, leading to ketoacidosis. This may be where the rumor that keto and ketosis are not safe came from. Ketoacidosis — A Serious Condition That Is Not Caused By The Ketogenic Diet Ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes. It is brought on by being born without the ability to produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or living a lifestyle that promotes insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes). In both cases, there isn’t enough insulin to tell that cells that energy is available (insulin deficiency). The lack of insulin signaling causes the fat cells and liver cells to go into starvation mode, even after a calorically dense meal. The fat cells begin to dump triglycerides into the blood to provide the other cells with energy because the cells are perceiving that there is no fuel available. Meanwhile, the liver starts mobilizing stored glycogen and using gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis to provide the body with sugar and ketones that it doesn’t need. All of this causes bloo Continue reading >>

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

“Keto flu” is very common state during induction phase of Ketosis. This state is also followed by dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, or muscle cramps. Ketogenic life is real science, but don’t let loose yourself in a whole bunch of numbers. This article is very important for beginners, because they often have higher goals than experience. For some keto beginner’s, “Keto-flu” can be a real challenge for continuing or stopping with keto diet. Normalize your blood pressure People who ends up on Keto diet automatically ends up with cutting a lot of processed food rich with sodium. Reduced intake of carbs causing proper leveling of blood sugar, for that reason our body doesn’t need to elevate levels of insulin to stabilize blood sugar. The final effect is, low blood pressure In normal conditions our kidneys tend to store high levels of sodium. But on low insulin levels, kidneys change their behavior. There are a lot of hormonal activities which the kidneys put in diuretic type mode. In this mode kidneys release stored levels of sodium, potassium, and water through the urine. The major function of the salt is maintaining blood pressure, but if you do not replace your daily needs of salt as a side effect you can feel dizziness, fatigue, or weakness. For that reason introduce salt and fluids in your diet. Fluids are essential part for right leveling blood pressure. There are certainly kind of beverages that are carb-free or very low in carbs. Check out a few ideas in the link below (Premium Collection of Keto Beverages) Another easy way to overcome this state is preparing (Natural Sugar-free Ketogenic Electrolyte Drink). This drink refuels your daily needs for sodium, magnesium and potassium. Prevent nausea and diarrhea Some people have bad experience with Keto-flu foll Continue reading >>

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