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Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

This is not a “feel-good” post. We are going to talk about some of the not-so-pleasant side effects of transitioning into ketosis, especially looking at why ketones (and transitioning to ketosis, in general) can cause stomach pain. We will also talk about what you can do to solve the issues. Some are practical solutions; others have to do with summoning the mental strength to just deal with a little discomfort to get the rewards and results you want. If Captain Jack Sparrow were doing the ketogenic diet, he would probably say. “The stomach pain is not the problem… it’s your attitude about the stomach pain which is the problem.” I’ve been there too. The first time I ever tried exogenous ketones, I was about 16 hours removed from carbohydrates (In-N-Out burger) and I was feeling awful. I thought Perfect Keto would make it all better. I took a heaping scoop of Peaches and Cream and waited 30 minutes. The results? Significant stomach issues, to put it kindly. I thought surely these ketones are bad and I quit my attempt to “go keto” on the spot. Why Ketosis Causes Stomach Pain The short answer is dehydration. The process of keto-adaptation is going to dehydrate us. Remember that one purpose of taking exogenous ketones is to speed up keto-adaptation. This means taking ketones will also speed up the side-effects of keto-adaptation. Why Does Ketosis Dehydrate? Transitioning to keto means we are moving from using glycogen and carbs to using fat and ketones. There are two reasons this dehydrates us. 1) One of the main inefficiencies with glycogen and carbs is that it must be stored with water. It takes 4 grams of water to store a gram of glycogen.[1] As you run through your glycogen you will lose tons of water (not literally tons but you get the point). 2) High Continue reading >>

Reversing Impaired Kidney Function In Diabetics May Be Possible With Ketogenic Diet

Reversing Impaired Kidney Function In Diabetics May Be Possible With Ketogenic Diet

Reversing impaired kidney function in diabetics may be possible with the ketogenic diet. The researchers at Mount Sinai Medical School found that the ketogenic diet, a style of eating based on high-fat and low-carbohydrate intake, may be beneficial in reversing kidney function. The researchers studied mice that were genetically predisposed to have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The mice went on to develop diabetic kidney damage. Half of the mice were put on the ketogenic diet and the other half served as controls. After eight weeks, molecular indicators of kidney damage were reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet, along with kidney pathology in mice with type 2 diabetes. Researcher Charles Mobbs said, “Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes. This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year.” The ketogenic diet has also been found to be successful in controlling seizures in epileptic children. Many cells in the body obtain their energy from ketones, which are produced when glucose levels are low and blood fat levels are high. High glucose in diabetes has been suspected to lead to kidney damage, so the ketogenic style of eating blocks the toxic effects of glucose. Unfortunately, the diet is pretty extreme, so it is not a long-term solution for adults. Still, the researchers suggest that even a limited exposure to the diet may be enough to reset gene expression and pathological processes associated with kidney failure. Dr. Mobbs concluded, “Knowing how the ketogenic diet reverses nephropathy will help us identify a drug target and subsequent pharmacological intervention Continue reading >>

Can A High-protein Diet Reduce Back Pain?

Can A High-protein Diet Reduce Back Pain?

High-protein diets have become very popular for weight loss and body building. New diets are popping up all the time, promising a slim waist and reduced appetite. Another allure of these diets is the idea that one can eat butter, bacon and steak as opposed to salads, and still lose weight. The list of approved foods in this type of diet sounds like a dieter’s dream to be sure. How do these diets work? High-protein, low-carb diets cause the body to burn fat for energy and, if the diet is adhered to long enough, it causes the body to go into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when a body burns fat, including its own, for fuel. This often results in weight loss. While burning fat, the body produces a substance called ketones – acids that can change the pH of a person’s blood. Due to the upped pH, calcium is excreted in an attempt to balance the body. This means high-protein diets can cause strain on the kidneys and possibly cause kidney stones. Pain caused by kidney problems is felt in the back, causing or worsening symptoms. Calcium depletion can cause more than the possibility of kidney stones. The calcium consumed is excreted and doesn’t go toward keeping bones healthy. The lack of calcium could spur on osteoporosis, weakening vertebrae and taking support away from the spine. Weakened vertebrae cause more pressure on discs in the neck and back, which can cause pain. Low-fiber diets can worsen lower back pain by lack of proper waste evacuation. The pressure of digested food accumulating in the lower intestine can cause pain in the abdomen and lower back. For proper elimination it’s important to eat enough vegetables, fruits and whole grains; foods that are often avoided in a high-protein low-carb diet. Many foods containing anti-inflammatory properties are also Continue reading >>

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

“Keto flu” is very common state during induction phase of Ketosis. This state is also followed by dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, or muscle cramps. Ketogenic life is real science, but don’t let loose yourself in a whole bunch of numbers. This article is very important for beginners, because they often have higher goals than experience. For some keto beginner’s, “Keto-flu” can be a real challenge for continuing or stopping with keto diet. Normalize your blood pressure People who ends up on Keto diet automatically ends up with cutting a lot of processed food rich with sodium. Reduced intake of carbs causing proper leveling of blood sugar, for that reason our body doesn’t need to elevate levels of insulin to stabilize blood sugar. The final effect is, low blood pressure In normal conditions our kidneys tend to store high levels of sodium. But on low insulin levels, kidneys change their behavior. There are a lot of hormonal activities which the kidneys put in diuretic type mode. In this mode kidneys release stored levels of sodium, potassium, and water through the urine. The major function of the salt is maintaining blood pressure, but if you do not replace your daily needs of salt as a side effect you can feel dizziness, fatigue, or weakness. For that reason introduce salt and fluids in your diet. Fluids are essential part for right leveling blood pressure. There are certainly kind of beverages that are carb-free or very low in carbs. Check out a few ideas in the link below (Premium Collection of Keto Beverages) Another easy way to overcome this state is preparing (Natural Sugar-free Ketogenic Electrolyte Drink). This drink refuels your daily needs for sodium, magnesium and potassium. Prevent nausea and diarrhea Some people have bad experience with Keto-flu foll Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain - Low-carb, high-protein diets: risks (ketosis) benefits, High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like the atkins diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. these programs generally recommend that dieters. Pictures types breast cancer, Pictures showing breast cancer types click on the images to enlarge and to read more about types of breast cancer.. Nagato | narutopedia | fandom powered wikia, Nagato (長門, nagato) was a shinobi of amegakure and descendant of the uzumaki clan. forming. Is ketosis dangerous? - eating academy, You may have heard from your doctor that ketosis is a life-threatening condition. if so, your doctor is confusing diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) with nutritional ketosis. Ketosis – advantaged misunderstood state? (part ), Melancholy aeon november 27, 2012 @gus “he claimed that he had seen ‘severe cns effects’ in those who attempted ketosis,” bwah-ha-ha-ha! i eat 1650 calories a. Esophagus - pain neck, The esophagus- anatomy the esophagus is a relatively straight cartilaginous tube, measuring 25-30cm in an adult, which connects to the pharynx and through which food. Kidney stones: symptoms, , treatment, What causes kidney stones? learn to recognize the symptoms and signs of kidney stone pain. explore kidney stone treatment and how to prevent kidney stones.. The ultimate ketogenic diet beginner’ guide, This guide will help you get started on ketogenic diet basics, and what type best fits your lifestyle.. How prevent gallstones naturally diet | natural, The american medical association suggests that a low-fat, high-fiber diet can also help prevent gallstones. we suggest ingesting fiber from whole plant sources. Lowcarb, highprotein diets risks (ketosis) and benefits → Pictures of types of breast Continue reading >>

Is The Current Rise In Kidney Disease Due To Our Over-consumption Of Animal Source Foods?

Is The Current Rise In Kidney Disease Due To Our Over-consumption Of Animal Source Foods?

I periodically get asked about concerns regarding the growing rates of kidney disease and concerns about kidney health in general in relation to a diet based in animal source foods. The worry is that consuming animal protein might somehow put a strain on kidneys and even lead to kidney damage over time. Here are the facts: In the United States, approximately one in three adults aged 65 years and older currently has chronic kidney disease. Certain mainstream sources are determined to find every which way to blame and further vilify animal source foods in this equation (and innumerable others), while extolling the supposed virtues of a plant-based diet. This is a pervasive misinformation trend, and one that I take on in my newest book, Primal Fat Burner. For starters, I don’t see the rise in kidney disease as necessarily being unrelated to the rise in metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the result of insulin resistance (which, in turn, is overwhelmingly the result of excess carbohydrate consumption—not fat or protein consumption). As my friend, Ron Rosedale, MD has aptly pointed out (and I’m paraphrasing somewhat), the development of obesity, in some respects, is technically the price your body pays to try and keep you from becoming diabetic. Excess sugars continually get stored through the efforts of insulin in your fat cells until the day your fat cells are no longer able to respond to insulin and there’s no place else for the sugar to go. Among the tissues unfortunate enough to lack the capacity for insulin resistance include your nerve cells and brain tissue, which may become chronically bombarded with excess tissue-damaging insulin and glucose and undergo degenerative changes. Nerve cells are readily damaged by glycation and through this process eventua Continue reading >>

Reversal Of Diabetic Nephropathy By A Ketogenic Diet

Reversal Of Diabetic Nephropathy By A Ketogenic Diet

Go to: Introduction While intensive insulin therapy and other interventions slow the development of diabetic complications [1], there is far less evidence that these interventions reverse diabetic complications. For example, tight glucose control prevented the development of nephropathy (as indicated by proteinuria) in a rat model of Type 1 diabetes, but did not reverse nephropathy once proteinuria had developed [2]. Thus there is a general consensus that diabetes is associated with progressive and cumulative processes that are much more amenable to retardation than to reversal. Nevertheless, from a clinical perspective, reversing pathologies associated with diabetes would be far more valuable than simply delaying their onset. We have proposed that both diabetic complications and age-related pathologies develop due to a progressive and cumulative effect of glucose metabolism that produces a bistable hysteretic effect on gene expression [3]. In addition to glycolytic enzymes that would be expected to produce oxidative stress [3], glucose metabolism also induces a variety of molecular responses such as thioredoxin-interaction protein [4] and p65 [5] that could plausibly contribute to nephropathy. Indeed, the latter induction is persistent, even after normalization of glucose, thus exemplifying glucose-induced hysteresis and its clinical correlate, metabolic memory, including in nephropathy [6]. Furthermore, based particularly on detailed analysis of the hysteretic behavior of the lac operon [7], [8], we have hypothesized that sufficiently prolonged and robust reduction in glucose metabolism or molecular responses to glucose metabolism may reverse this bistable molecular state, leading to reversal of pathology [3]. While examining basic mechanisms mediating molecular respo Continue reading >>

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

It’s funny how our mental state really affects how we write and what we are interested in. When I wrote the introduction to this piece I was just getting settled into our new place in Santa Fe, NM and was looking at over a month at home to work and write. Then a number of wacky events happened and I’ve been home about 7 days out of the last month and I’ve only made it about 70 pages into Kon-Tiki. Ouch. Now I’m home for 8 days and will then be gone for a project that will take me completely off the grid for nearly 3 weeks. No phone, email…nada. When I sat down to do this kidney piece it was with a mindset that I had a ton of time and could really sink my teeth into it. Now I’m time crunched and anxious that I will get it done at all! Up front here I’d like to thank Mat “The Kraken” Lalonde with his help on some literature for this piece. Any inaccuracies however are my own tomfoolery. If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following: 1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE. 2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage. 3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage. 4-Many kidney issues have either a hyperinsulinemic characteristic, an autoimmune characteristic, and or a combination of autoimmunity or hyperinsulinism. A standard, low-ish carb paleo diet can fix most of these issues. 5-For serious kidney damage a low-protein, ketogenic diet can be remarkably therapeutic. 6-If you get kidney stones that are from oxalates, reduce your green veggie intake (spinach for example) and have other types of veggies. 7-If you get kidney stones that are from urate salts, you are likely NOT following a low-ish carb paleo diet, you likely have insulin resistance and your liver is not processing uric acid Continue reading >>

Treating Kidney Disease With Diet And Keto Acids

Treating Kidney Disease With Diet And Keto Acids

A low protein diet is needed to manage chronic kidney disease, but what if you take too little protein? Most people are probably aware that we all have two kidneys that filter out waste products from our body in the form of urine. But many might not be aware that these bean-shaped, fist-sized organs can actually take a great deal of punishment before showing any noticeable symptoms. In fact, we can live a fairly normal life with just one kidney, as both kidney transplant recipients and donors can attest to. The downside however, is that we are often unaware that anything is wrong with our kidneys until it is too late. According to consultant nephrologist Dr Chong Yip Boon, around 30-40% of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients who come to see him for the first time already have such advanced conditions that most of their kidney function cannot be salvaged. “Most patients with CKD do not have symptoms, or only mild to moderate symptoms; that is why it is called ‘a silent killer’,” he says. Many of the symptoms are also fairly generic, like loss of appetite and weight, nausea and vomiting, itchiness, fatigue, swollen legs and frothy urine, making it a tough job to correctly diagnose CKD. And even these symptoms only tend to manifest in the later stages of the disease, often when patients are just a step away from needing dialysis. By then, it is a fighting action to maintain the remaining kidney function, rather than curative, which can be undertaken at the earlier stages. Causes and management According to Dr Chong, the causes of CKD include diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis (i.e. inflammation of the glomerulus), kidney stones, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), genetic conditions like polycystic kidneys, recurrent kidney infect Continue reading >>

4 Ways Ketogenic Diet Benefits In Rheumatoid Arthritis (dosage, Precautions)

4 Ways Ketogenic Diet Benefits In Rheumatoid Arthritis (dosage, Precautions)

Rheumatoid arthritis(RA) is a disease in which the body’s immune system attacks its own healthy cells. This causes inflammation, swelling, pain and redness of the bone joints. It can affect any joint of the body [1]. Rheumatoid arthritis mostly affects women than men [2]. The exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis is not identified but it may be related to genetic, environmental and hormonal factors [3]. Inflammation involves the accumulation of immune cells (that protect the body from foreign substances) at the joints which are brought about by biochemical compounds called inflammatory mediators [4]. Diet control can have a great influence on disease control [5]. One such unique diet proposed to reduce inflammation is called Ketogenic Diet. Before we discuss its benefits let us know a little about this diet. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is a fat rich and low carbohydrate diet. The carbohydrates consumed in a normal diet are converted to glucose and used as energy. The fats in the diet are usually stored in the body [6]. When there is a low intake of carbohydrate in the diet the body is forced to metabolize fat. This allows the body to depend on fat rather than glucose [7]. Fat metabolism results in the release of ketones (product of fat metabolism in the body) into the blood, which provides energy to the body. This state of increased ketones in the body is known as ketosis [8]. A ketogenic diet mainly focuses on achieving the state of ketosis and these ketones provide the energy required for the body’s functions [9]. The total calorie intake is restricted to three-fourths of the normal calorie intake but, the volume may appear much smaller [10]. Does Ketogenic Diet Benefit in Rheumatoid Arthritis? The Ketogenic diet can help in rheumatoid arthritis in Continue reading >>

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. New guidelines recommend people who have had a kidney stone increase their fluid intake so they have at least two liters of urine per day Increasing water consumption could decrease your risk of kidney stone recurrence by at least half By Dr. Mercola In the 1970s, less than 4 percent of Americans had suffered from kidney stones. By the 1990s, this had increased to more than 5 percent. Today, with rates continuing to rise, kidney stones will impact one in 10 US adults at some point during their lives1 -- usually between the ages of 20 and 50. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing lasting damage, but the pain during passing can be excruciating. Kidney stones are also sometimes associated with lower back pain, stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, and chills. Generally, the larger the stone, the more pain and symptoms it will cause. Sometimes aggressive treatments are needed to clear the stones, and each year, more than half a million people go to US emergency rooms due to kidney stones.2 Once you've had them, your risk of recurrence increases. About 35 percent to 50 percent of people will have another bout with kidney stones within five years unless changes are made.3 What type of changes? According to new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP), one of the simplest strategies you can take is to drink more water. Staying Hydrated Lowers Your Risk of Recurrent Kidney Stones The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. If you aren't drinking enough, your urine will have higher concentrations of substances that can precipitate out and form stones. Specifically, stone-forming chemicals include calcium, oxalate, urate, cysteine, xanthine Continue reading >>

Living With Pkd

Living With Pkd

Currently no specific diet has been proven to make your polycystic kidneys better or keep them from getting worse. It is, however, ideal to eat a balanced and healthy diet to maintain optimal body conditions. A healthy body is able to fight infection better, and bounce back faster. Accumulation of waste products filtered by your kidneys will build up in your blood as kidney function declines. At the more advanced stages of kidney failure (i.e. GFR <30-40 percent), significant accumulation of these waste products in your blood can cause symptoms of kidney failure. Should I stop eating protein? The major source of these waste products is the food you eat, especially protein. Therefore, when you have lost a significant amount of kidney function, a lower protein diet may be ordered by your doctor. Studies from both animals and humans with chronic kidney failure have shown that eating large amounts of protein may accelerate the progressive decline of kidney function. However, the Modification in Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study done by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked at protein intake and kidney function. The results did not show any benefit of lowering protein intake in individuals with PKD. At this time, there is no convincing evidence to suggest protein restriction as beneficial unless you are in kidney failure. Despite all of this, many consider it unwise to consume a very high protein diet. If you have moderate to advanced kidney failure, however, a modest restriction may be appropriate. For more information, you should consult your doctor and a dietitian experienced with kidney disease and ideally knowledge of PKD (also known as a renal dietician). Should I stop eating salt? High blood pressure in PKD does not seem to be caused by salt intake. Regardle Continue reading >>

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