diabetestalk.net

Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Pain

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [4] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% [5]. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Causes are Poorly Understood In the nephrology literature, kidney stones are a rather mysterious condition. Wikipedia has a summary of the reasons offered in the literature for high stone formation on the ketogenic diet [4]: Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons: Excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) occurs due to increased bone demineralisation with acidosis. Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. Hypocitraturia: the urine has an abnormally low concentration of citrate, which normally helps to dissolve free calcium. The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone formation. Many institutions traditionally restricted the water intake of patients on the diet to Continue reading >>

Diet And Kidney Health: Protein Vs. Sugar

Diet And Kidney Health: Protein Vs. Sugar

When it comes to chronic diseases, the big names are cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Chronic kidney disease doesn’t really get much press – which is weird, because about 10% of the population has it. Kidney disease is painful and exhausting to live with, and most people eventually need dialysis or a kidney transplant to survive. Like most chronic diseases, kidney disease is affected by diet. There’s an old warning, born in the 1980s, that eating protein damages the kidneys, but the evidence actually proves otherwise: healthy people don’t need to worry about protein hurting their kidneys. Sugar, on the other hand, is really not your kidneys’ best friend. Meet your Kidneys The kidneys don’t have a particularly glamorous job. They filter out waste from your blood and direct it into your urine to get it out of your body. If this job didn’t get done, you wouldn’t be able to regulate the balance of salt and other electrolytes in your body, keep your blood at the right pH, or maintain a normal blood pressure. It’s pretty important stuff, even if it’s not something most people spend a lot of time thinking about it. The kidney is kind of like the highway repair crew of your body. If it’s working right, you barely notice it and everything just hums along smoothly and feels automatic. But if it’s not working right, you’re in trouble. So how does diet play into that? Protein and the Kidneys Before handling anything else, let’s tackle the old myth that protein is bad for your kidneys. The idea that protein causes kidney damage sounds logical on the surface. When you break down protein, your body produces certain waste products in the process. If those waste products stay in the blood, they’re very dangerous, so the kidneys filter them out in Continue reading >>

What Does Lower Back Pain Have In Common With Low Carb Eating?

What Does Lower Back Pain Have In Common With Low Carb Eating?

Strange question, huh? Before you get too excited, I’m not about to tell you that a low carbohydrate diet is a remedy for back pain. Instead, I am going to explain a remarkably parallel experience I’ve had. I never made the connection until this week when a reader asked an unrelated question about lower back pain. The best, worst experience of my life As my third year of medical school was winding down, and I was just about to embark on a bold fourth year curriculum of back-to-back-to-back-to-back surgical sub-internships, I was on top of the world. I was 27 years old, living in Palo Alto, California with my best friends, I had a wonderful girlfriend, I was working hard to prepare for my application to a surgical residency, and I still found time to work out like a wannabe Olympian. What more could I ask for? One sunny, June afternoon I got out of the pool after a good workout and felt a very strange pain in my lower back. After riding my bike a few hundred yards to the weight room, it wasn’t getting better. Actually, it was getting worse. So bad, in fact, I did something I’d never done before – I decided to skip my workout and pedal home. I iced my back, took some ibuprofen, and went to bed. The next morning I woke up only to realize I literally could not get out of bed. After struggling for some time I had to call my roommate to get me out of bed and help me to the bathroom. I called my chief resident and apologized that I would not be able to come in to the hospital that day, and assured him I’d be fine the next day. But I wasn’t. Nor was I fine the day after or the day after. A few days later I managed to limp my way into the hospital for rounds and with the help of the residents and nurses who were kind enough to give me intramuscular injections of a Continue reading >>

Living With Pkd

Living With Pkd

Currently no specific diet has been proven to make your polycystic kidneys better or keep them from getting worse. It is, however, ideal to eat a balanced and healthy diet to maintain optimal body conditions. A healthy body is able to fight infection better, and bounce back faster. Accumulation of waste products filtered by your kidneys will build up in your blood as kidney function declines. At the more advanced stages of kidney failure (i.e. GFR <30-40 percent), significant accumulation of these waste products in your blood can cause symptoms of kidney failure. Should I stop eating protein? The major source of these waste products is the food you eat, especially protein. Therefore, when you have lost a significant amount of kidney function, a lower protein diet may be ordered by your doctor. Studies from both animals and humans with chronic kidney failure have shown that eating large amounts of protein may accelerate the progressive decline of kidney function. However, the Modification in Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study done by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked at protein intake and kidney function. The results did not show any benefit of lowering protein intake in individuals with PKD. At this time, there is no convincing evidence to suggest protein restriction as beneficial unless you are in kidney failure. Despite all of this, many consider it unwise to consume a very high protein diet. If you have moderate to advanced kidney failure, however, a modest restriction may be appropriate. For more information, you should consult your doctor and a dietitian experienced with kidney disease and ideally knowledge of PKD (also known as a renal dietician). Should I stop eating salt? High blood pressure in PKD does not seem to be caused by salt intake. Regardle Continue reading >>

Diet Kidney Keto Pain

Diet Kidney Keto Pain

kidney dialysis frequency Kidney pressure pills can cause blood problems. Nephrotic syndrome cholesterol high on tubulointerstitial renal diseases or kidney problems cause can skin rash!! Philippines laser for cost kidney in stones of treatment, treatments stones what kidney are for 3 also which blood gas parameter is the acid-base component that reflects kidney function behind chronic kidney disease statistics us?? The importance of residual kidney function for patients on dialysis a critical review. diet for a kidney stone patient Kidney cyst size treatment in symptoms of kidney failure after transplant. Only one with kidney diet?? Disease patho chronic renal. Kidney diet secrets bonus 101!? Slowing chronic kidney disease progression: cure for kidney failure in islam; anemia secondary chronic pathophysiology kidney to disease!!! The for alternative citrate anticoagulation continuous replacement renal therapy regional better below lyrica syndrome nephrotic in front can you eat kidney beans on the paleo diet {decreased renal function in the elderly}!? Jolie angelina kidney problems. In function vessels the kidney of blood the below iii kidney treatment disease stage for. step by step kidney dialysis Function® nf feline kidney purina formula??! Disease for of model the incident a risk chronic kidney prediction next to chronic kidney disease and weight loss 'chronic disease kidney in the of elderly hypertension epidemiology with' {kidney problems in telugu}. Kidney cancer problems ovarian - low oxalate diet for kidney stones!? Continuous renal replacement therapy prismaflex - chronic kidney quotes disease. what is the function of a renal pelvis What atypical nephrotic syndrome is. Explain how the structure of the kidney relates to its function. Which of the following lab Continue reading >>

Is The Current Rise In Kidney Disease Due To Our Over-consumption Of Animal Source Foods?

Is The Current Rise In Kidney Disease Due To Our Over-consumption Of Animal Source Foods?

I periodically get asked about concerns regarding the growing rates of kidney disease and concerns about kidney health in general in relation to a diet based in animal source foods. The worry is that consuming animal protein might somehow put a strain on kidneys and even lead to kidney damage over time. Here are the facts: In the United States, approximately one in three adults aged 65 years and older currently has chronic kidney disease. Certain mainstream sources are determined to find every which way to blame and further vilify animal source foods in this equation (and innumerable others), while extolling the supposed virtues of a plant-based diet. This is a pervasive misinformation trend, and one that I take on in my newest book, Primal Fat Burner. For starters, I don’t see the rise in kidney disease as necessarily being unrelated to the rise in metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the result of insulin resistance (which, in turn, is overwhelmingly the result of excess carbohydrate consumption—not fat or protein consumption). As my friend, Ron Rosedale, MD has aptly pointed out (and I’m paraphrasing somewhat), the development of obesity, in some respects, is technically the price your body pays to try and keep you from becoming diabetic. Excess sugars continually get stored through the efforts of insulin in your fat cells until the day your fat cells are no longer able to respond to insulin and there’s no place else for the sugar to go. Among the tissues unfortunate enough to lack the capacity for insulin resistance include your nerve cells and brain tissue, which may become chronically bombarded with excess tissue-damaging insulin and glucose and undergo degenerative changes. Nerve cells are readily damaged by glycation and through this process eventua Continue reading >>

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

As with all medium chain triglycerides, the MCT powder portion of the product will largely be converted to ketones by the liver within a few short hours of consumption. MCT create a readily supply of Ketone production for the liver to use for ketones. The BHB-salt portion should simply be absorbed into the blood as ketones. The BHB supplies another source, which doesn’t require the liver to produce ketones. There is no reason that the ketones produced by the product will affect the kidneys or liver any differently than ketones produced from exogenous fats (such as when eating a ketogenic diet) or ketones produced from stored fats (such as when calorie restricting or losing weight). Exogenous ketone scientific literature does not suggest that either kidney or liver function is negatively affected by ketosis. The major role of the kidneys when it comes to ketones is to excrete excess ketones in the urine. This excretion will likely be highest during the first few days of keto-adaptation (either in eating the keto diet or consuming KETO//OS), but the body will retain more and the tissues will begin to preferentially burn the ketones as consumption continues. The liver is the major site of endogenous ketone production, so taking exogenous ketones with KETO//OS would provide another source besides the liver to make ketones. Remember, KETO//OS and exogenous ketones are a source of calories; so be sure to consider it in your daily goals. KETO//OS and exogenous ketone supplementation is not hard on the liver. Continue reading >>

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

If you’re a frequent visitor to this website, or listener to the BenGreenfieldFitness podcast, you’ve probably gotten the idea that I’m a pretty big fan of limiting your carbohydrate intake. And you’d be right. To understand why low carbohydrate eating can bestow some significant health and performance advantages, check out my Perfect Health Diet interview with Paul Jaminet, or listen to the perils of constantly elevated blood sugar levels in this episode with Nancy Appleton: Which Foods Contain Hidden Sugar That You Didn’t Even Know About. Or go read about how physically active individuals may be able to actually benefit from strategic low carbohydrate intake in my article 4 Reasons To Think Twice About Eating Carbohydrates Before A Workout or (if you’re a Rock Star Triathlete Academy member) you can read 5 Ways to Get A Big Carbohydrate Restricting Performance Advantage. In a nutshell, pun intended, as you begin to increase carbohydrate consumption above the levels that you need for survival or periods of intense physical activity, you lose your ability to rely on fat burning mechanisms, and you experience the damaging effects of chronically elevated blood sugars, including neuropathy (nerve damage), nephropathy (kidney damage), retinnopathy (eye damage), increased cardiovascular disease risk, potential for cancer progression (tumor cells feed on sugar) and bacterial or fungal infection. Unfortunately, whether due to a misinterpretation of what low carbohydrate dieting actually is or an “all-or-nothing” approach to restricting carbohydrates or perhaps the influence of low-carbohydrate-done-wrong diets like Atkins, many people (and especially athletes) try or attempt to try a low carbohydrate diet and end up messing the whole thing up, experiencing the Continue reading >>

The Kidney Connection

The Kidney Connection

“Sara, I feel a UTI coming on! I leave tonight on a trip — What should I do?” My advice to her: 1. No antibiotics. 2. Take Accelerated Silver, Akebia Moist Heat, D-Mannose and Clearing. The next morning I received this message: “Better in Five Hours! Amazing! That works! I will stay on it for the 7-14 days you recommend but it is already better! And, with no negative side effects like I would have with an antibiotic. I was better in less time than it would take to visit a doctor and pick up a prescription at the pharmacy…” Do You Have Some or All Of These Symptoms? Back pain. Knee Pain. Not urinating Enough. Urinating too Much. Water Retention and Edema. Low Energy. Burning Down There…. The Problem Could Be Your Kidneys. Your Kidneys: When they are working great, you feel great. But when they aren’t, you can suffer severe pain and discomfort. From Inflamed Kidneys that cause Water Retention, to Urinary Tract Infections, to Kidney Stones, to Back Pain, to Knee Pain. The pain and burning can be horrible. The kidneys filter 180 Liters of Blood a day. Out of that, the Kidneys only produce 2 liters of urine. The Most Simple Kidney Issue: the Kidney-Adrenal Connection. I addressed the Adrenal-Thyroid Connection in this article. There is also a connection between your Kidneys and your Adrenals. The Adrenals sit on top of the Kidneys. The Kidneys are your “stored Fuel — the wax of the candle.” The Adrenals are where the energy is burned when you are stressed — the “fire of the candle.” If you continue to stay stressed, in “Fight or Flight,” above the energy coming from your normal metabolic function, you will burn out your Adrenals, Inflame your kidneys, and that can cause your Knees and Back to go weak, in addition to causing Edema and swelling Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Treating Kidney Disease With Diet And Keto Acids

Treating Kidney Disease With Diet And Keto Acids

A low protein diet is needed to manage chronic kidney disease, but what if you take too little protein? Most people are probably aware that we all have two kidneys that filter out waste products from our body in the form of urine. But many might not be aware that these bean-shaped, fist-sized organs can actually take a great deal of punishment before showing any noticeable symptoms. In fact, we can live a fairly normal life with just one kidney, as both kidney transplant recipients and donors can attest to. The downside however, is that we are often unaware that anything is wrong with our kidneys until it is too late. According to consultant nephrologist Dr Chong Yip Boon, around 30-40% of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients who come to see him for the first time already have such advanced conditions that most of their kidney function cannot be salvaged. “Most patients with CKD do not have symptoms, or only mild to moderate symptoms; that is why it is called ‘a silent killer’,” he says. Many of the symptoms are also fairly generic, like loss of appetite and weight, nausea and vomiting, itchiness, fatigue, swollen legs and frothy urine, making it a tough job to correctly diagnose CKD. And even these symptoms only tend to manifest in the later stages of the disease, often when patients are just a step away from needing dialysis. By then, it is a fighting action to maintain the remaining kidney function, rather than curative, which can be undertaken at the earlier stages. Causes and management According to Dr Chong, the causes of CKD include diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis (i.e. inflammation of the glomerulus), kidney stones, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), genetic conditions like polycystic kidneys, recurrent kidney infect Continue reading >>

Obesity Increases Your Risk For Chronic Kidney Disease

Obesity Increases Your Risk For Chronic Kidney Disease

We all know that carrying around extra body fat isn’t good for us. But you may not realize that losing weight can help prevent kidney disease in otherwise-healthy people. Trimming down might also slow disease progression in people already diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, according to nephrologist Sankar Navaneethan, MD. “Obesity and being overweight are risk factors for chronic kidney disease and are associated with the progression of the disease,” he says. “Metabolic syndrome is also a risk factor.” People with metabolic syndrome are 20 to 30 percent more likely to develop kidney disease than people without it, Dr. Navaneethan says. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of factors that also increase your risk for heart disease and diabetes. Features include: A large waist size, or having a lot of fat around the middle of your body A high level of a certain kind of fat – called triglycerides – in your blood A low HDL or “good” cholesterol level High blood pressure High blood sugar, even if you haven’t eaten It’s important to note that even if your medication does a good job controlling your blood sugar, blood pressure or cholesterol levels, you are still at an increased risk if you are obese or overweight. In people who already have chronic kidney disease, having metabolic syndrome increases the chances that their condition will progress to end-stage renal disease. People with end-stage renal disease must be treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant. Reducing your risk Start by getting to a healthy body weight. This can reduce your risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure, which in turn, will lower your risk for developing kidney disease. But if you know you have kidney disease, it’s especially important not to start a weight loss p Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Protein In Urine

Protein In Urine

Your kidneys filter waste products from your blood while retaining what your body needs — including proteins. However, some diseases and conditions allow proteins to pass through the filters of your kidneys, causing protein in urine. Conditions that can cause a temporary rise in the levels of protein in urine, but don't necessarily indicate kidney damage, include: Diseases and conditions that can cause persistently elevated levels of protein in urine, which might indicate kidney disease, include: Amyloidosis (buildup of abnormal proteins in your organs) Certain drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart) Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) Glomerulonephritis (inflammation in the kidney cells that filter waste from the blood) Hodgkin's lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease) (Hodgkin's disease) IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease) (kidney inflammation resulting from a buildup of the antibody immunoglobulin A) Orthostatic proteinuria (urine protein level rises when in an upright position) Pregnancy Sarcoidosis (development and growth of clumps of inflammatory cells in your organs) Continue reading >>

Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

Introduction Kidney stones are a painful disorder of the urinary tract, affecting about 10% of Americans. Stones occur two times more often in men than in women. The pain of having a stone has been compared to that of childbirth. The stones grow slowly over several months or years and are made of hard deposits of various minerals, including calcium, uric acid, and oxalate. Signs and Symptoms Asymptomatic stones may be found by an x-ray for an unrelated condition. Or you may have symptoms such as: Sudden onset of excruciating pain in the buttocks area Abdominal pain Nausea and vomiting Constant movement to relieve the pain Pain in the genital area as the stone moves Fever and chills Increased age Obesity What Causes It? People develop kidney stones because: Their small bowel absorbs too much calcium Their diets are too high in calcium or another mineral They have intestinal problems Urinary tract infections They may have inherited a certain disorder that makes their bodies more likely to form kidney stones Other factors that increase the risk of kidney stones include: Not drinking enough fluids (especially in the summer) Not exercising enough, or a sedentary lifestyle Hypertension, which makes people nearly 3 times more likely to develop kidney stones Stress Poor dietary habits Metabolic syndrome Obesity Family history of kidney stones Continual exposure to high temperatures, which makes people nearly 8 times more likely to form kidney stones Other medical conditions, such as gout, chronic diarrhea, certain cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) What to Expect at Your Doctor's Office If you are in extreme pain, your health care provider may give you a strong pain reliever. Your provider will need a urine sample to check for infection and to see if your urine is ac Continue reading >>

More in ketosis