diabetestalk.net

Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Pain

Protein In Urine

Protein In Urine

Your kidneys filter waste products from your blood while retaining what your body needs — including proteins. However, some diseases and conditions allow proteins to pass through the filters of your kidneys, causing protein in urine. Conditions that can cause a temporary rise in the levels of protein in urine, but don't necessarily indicate kidney damage, include: Diseases and conditions that can cause persistently elevated levels of protein in urine, which might indicate kidney disease, include: Amyloidosis (buildup of abnormal proteins in your organs) Certain drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart) Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) Glomerulonephritis (inflammation in the kidney cells that filter waste from the blood) Hodgkin's lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease) (Hodgkin's disease) IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease) (kidney inflammation resulting from a buildup of the antibody immunoglobulin A) Orthostatic proteinuria (urine protein level rises when in an upright position) Pregnancy Sarcoidosis (development and growth of clumps of inflammatory cells in your organs) Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

It’s funny how our mental state really affects how we write and what we are interested in. When I wrote the introduction to this piece I was just getting settled into our new place in Santa Fe, NM and was looking at over a month at home to work and write. Then a number of wacky events happened and I’ve been home about 7 days out of the last month and I’ve only made it about 70 pages into Kon-Tiki. Ouch. Now I’m home for 8 days and will then be gone for a project that will take me completely off the grid for nearly 3 weeks. No phone, email…nada. When I sat down to do this kidney piece it was with a mindset that I had a ton of time and could really sink my teeth into it. Now I’m time crunched and anxious that I will get it done at all! Up front here I’d like to thank Mat “The Kraken” Lalonde with his help on some literature for this piece. Any inaccuracies however are my own tomfoolery. If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following: 1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE. 2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage. 3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage. 4-Many kidney issues have either a hyperinsulinemic characteristic, an autoimmune characteristic, and or a combination of autoimmunity or hyperinsulinism. A standard, low-ish carb paleo diet can fix most of these issues. 5-For serious kidney damage a low-protein, ketogenic diet can be remarkably therapeutic. 6-If you get kidney stones that are from oxalates, reduce your green veggie intake (spinach for example) and have other types of veggies. 7-If you get kidney stones that are from urate salts, you are likely NOT following a low-ish carb paleo diet, you likely have insulin resistance and your liver is not processing uric acid Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis happens when your body resorts to fat for energy after your stored carbohydrates have been burned out. It often occurs when people fast and exercise. But most commonly, ketosis occurs in people who eat low-carb, high-protein diets, which are also called ketogenic diets. There’s some evidence that ketosis can tax your kidneys, leading to kidney stones and low blood pressure. In diabetics, a variant of ketosis can be fatal. However, a small but growing group of health professionals say ketosis is not the poison you’ve been lead to think it was, and it may be better for you than high-carbohydrate eating. Your specific dietary habits are best advised by your healthcare provider or nutritionist. Video of the Day Ketosis happens when you get a buildup of a substance known as ketones, or ketone bodies in your blood. They are released when your body’s carbohydrate stores run out and you have to break down fat stores for energy. Dieters tend to deliberately cause ketosis because it makes you feel less hungry. However, ketosis also makes you feel tired and sluggish, because as "Medical News Today" reports, ketones aren’t the most efficient source of energy, especially for your brain. Ketosis can also harm your kidneys. Annually, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure in the United States, reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, or NIDDK. The condition is marked by the inability of your kidneys to do their job of eliminating wastes. One treatment for kidney failure is dialysis, a draining and lengthy artificial blood cleansing process. Another option is a kidney transplant. The NIDDK states that the cost of care for patients with kidney failure reached close to $32 billion in 2005. The federal government sub Continue reading >>

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Once upon a time, fat was the enemy of dieters. Nearly every product on the grocery store shelves had its “low-fat” version. Low-fat dressing. Low-fat cheese. Low-fat chips. Low-fat processed meats. Low-fat cookies. Low-fat freezer meals. It didn’t matter if the food itself was terrible for you and completely devoid of any nutrients (or even real food)… as long as it was “low-fat,” it was marketed as healthy for you. It was the way to lose weight for good. But then science begin to show us that fat wasn’t the enemy after all. In fact, eating plenty of healthy fats was the key to optimal health – and even sustainable weight loss. And today we have a diet rapidly growing in popularity that says, “Not only is fat good for you, you should be eating MOSTLY fat.” That’s right, I’m talking about the keto diet. Discover in just 7 short questions why you may be experiencing painful kidney stones and uncover how to return to your normal life. Take The Kidney Quiz Now! As with any unique diet plan, there are those who believe in it religiously and will “proselytize” to anyone who is listening. Then there are those who adamantly believe it to be dangerous. But one concern that pops up quite frequently from those who are skeptical is kidney stones. Can the keto diet encourage the formation of kidney stones? I’m here to help you examine that question. We’re going to learn more about the keto diet and what it does to your body. Then we are going to look at the science behind kidney stones and high-fat/low-carb dieting to see if the keto diet should be embraced or avoided if you suffer from kidney stones. What Is The Keto Diet? Though trendy now, the keto diet is not a new thing. It’s actually been around since the 1920s. In simple terms, the keto diet Continue reading >>

Mission Failure : The 5-day Water Fast Tries To Kill Me

Mission Failure : The 5-day Water Fast Tries To Kill Me

First, this isn’t really a food blog. It’s an account of escaping this, and instead, vagabonding around the world while gaining new experience. Now, on to my water fasting experience… I could feel every dimple and imperfection on the blueberry as I rolled it around on my tongue. It was like eating a blueberry for the first time. I could even sense its temperature with my mouth. When I finally got bold enough to chew it, the flavor was surprising. So was the sound when I swallowed and it hit my empty stomach, which then convulsed in surprise and annoyance that we were starting with fruit rather than saturated fat. Going just these 2.5 days with no food has given me a new appreciation for both eating and the people scattered around the globe who can’t eat when they want. I am a failure. After nearly 60 hours of starvation, just barely half way through my planned five-day water fast, I had to stop. When I woke up this morning, my right kidney was swollen, and it felt like someone had stuck me with a sword. I could barely drag around the house, and to make matters worse, I had a photo shoot for work. Nothing like trying to get people to smile when you are pastier than Neo from the Matrix and can’t straighten up all the way. I know, I know. I can hear the “I told you so” resonating all over the internet. As soon as I posted the start of my five-day starvation period — also known as a “fast” — I received a hail of criticism on the web. Facebook, Twitter, email — you name the network — the caring nastygrams came like a winter storm into my various inboxes. Yes, I know deliberate starvation is one of my more pathetic, half-baked adventures, but isn’t there a thin line between genius and madness? Completing a five-day water fast has been on my life bu Continue reading >>

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain

Ketosis Diet Kidney Pain - Low-carb, high-protein diets: risks (ketosis) benefits, High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like the atkins diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. these programs generally recommend that dieters. Pictures types breast cancer, Pictures showing breast cancer types click on the images to enlarge and to read more about types of breast cancer.. Nagato | narutopedia | fandom powered wikia, Nagato (長門, nagato) was a shinobi of amegakure and descendant of the uzumaki clan. forming. Is ketosis dangerous? - eating academy, You may have heard from your doctor that ketosis is a life-threatening condition. if so, your doctor is confusing diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) with nutritional ketosis. Ketosis – advantaged misunderstood state? (part ), Melancholy aeon november 27, 2012 @gus “he claimed that he had seen ‘severe cns effects’ in those who attempted ketosis,” bwah-ha-ha-ha! i eat 1650 calories a. Esophagus - pain neck, The esophagus- anatomy the esophagus is a relatively straight cartilaginous tube, measuring 25-30cm in an adult, which connects to the pharynx and through which food. Kidney stones: symptoms, , treatment, What causes kidney stones? learn to recognize the symptoms and signs of kidney stone pain. explore kidney stone treatment and how to prevent kidney stones.. The ultimate ketogenic diet beginner’ guide, This guide will help you get started on ketogenic diet basics, and what type best fits your lifestyle.. How prevent gallstones naturally diet | natural, The american medical association suggests that a low-fat, high-fiber diet can also help prevent gallstones. we suggest ingesting fiber from whole plant sources. Lowcarb, highprotein diets risks (ketosis) and benefits → Pictures of types of breast Continue reading >>

How Are Diabetes Andkidney Disease Related?

How Are Diabetes Andkidney Disease Related?

Diabetes mellitus is more commonly known to the public as diabetes. The connection between diabetes and kidney disease has been known for decades. Diabetes can occur in one of two ways: When the body doesn’t produce enough insulin. When the body cannot properly use insulin that the body produces. So how are diabetes and kidney disease related, and what part does insulin production and how the body uses it play a part? Insulin is an essential hormone for health. It governs the quantity of sugar that circulates through your blood. When blood sugar levels are too high or too low, the health of many of the body’s organs and tissues can be adversely affected. Diabetes is one of America’s leading chronic diseases. Diabetes is one of the most common conditions among patients who seek therapy at the National Stem Cell Institute (NSI), a leading regenerative medicine clinic based in the United States. So the physicians and medical staff at the Institute are well versed in the connection between diabetes and kidney disease. With that in mind, NSI takes a closer look at diabetes and how it affects the kidneys. The Difference Between Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 The connection between diabetes and kidney disease is strong regardless of the type of diabetes someone has. The two primary forms of diabetes are: Type 1. Formerly known as juvenile diabetes, this type generally occurs in childhood. In cases of type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce adequate amounts of insulin. People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections throughout their lives. Type 2. This type of diabetes is the most common form. In type 2, the pancreas produces plenty of insulin, but the body loses the ability to use it correctly. Traditionally, it develops after the age of 40. Howeve Continue reading >>

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

A s I walk down my hospital unit, on my way to the lunch room, I try to not be so conspicuous. The aroma of crisp fatty bacon leaves a trail of evidence that I simply can’t cover. In normal situations, I wouldn’t care if people saw me eating bacon. However, I’m a dietitian, and unless you are caught up on research, registered nutritionists should NOT be eating bacon. Explaining myself sometimes takes a lot of energy, and the last thing I need on my lunch break is a headache. Thus, I often chose my battles when it comes to explaining my low-carb, high-fat lifestyle. For clinical workers who are not up to speed, I may be viewed as a clinician who lacks integrity. Those of us who follow Carb Nite® or Carb Backloading™, know that simply isn’t the case, and in fact, quite the opposite. One of the biggest misconceptions I find is the thought that higher protein, or low-carb diets, cause damage to the kidneys. As I chomp on my bacon people often look at me with a dumbfounded look and ask, “Isn’t all that protein bad on your kidneys?” I thought this topic was old news. I was incorrect. It’s actually one of the most common questions, next to the saturated fat topic, that seems to keep resurfacing with whoever questions the low-carb lifestyle. It’s time to set the record straight. • Higher protein diets are safe for the general population. • There is a small population who may need to keep their protein intake at a minimum. • High-fat, moderate protein diets may have a protective effect in those with insulin resistance. It’s important to note the researched reviewed was not done on athletes; the recommendations made are for the average population. Higher protein diets are safe, for most people Research shows that high-protein diets may be harmful for Continue reading >>

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

If you’re a frequent visitor to this website, or listener to the BenGreenfieldFitness podcast, you’ve probably gotten the idea that I’m a pretty big fan of limiting your carbohydrate intake. And you’d be right. To understand why low carbohydrate eating can bestow some significant health and performance advantages, check out my Perfect Health Diet interview with Paul Jaminet, or listen to the perils of constantly elevated blood sugar levels in this episode with Nancy Appleton: Which Foods Contain Hidden Sugar That You Didn’t Even Know About. Or go read about how physically active individuals may be able to actually benefit from strategic low carbohydrate intake in my article 4 Reasons To Think Twice About Eating Carbohydrates Before A Workout or (if you’re a Rock Star Triathlete Academy member) you can read 5 Ways to Get A Big Carbohydrate Restricting Performance Advantage. In a nutshell, pun intended, as you begin to increase carbohydrate consumption above the levels that you need for survival or periods of intense physical activity, you lose your ability to rely on fat burning mechanisms, and you experience the damaging effects of chronically elevated blood sugars, including neuropathy (nerve damage), nephropathy (kidney damage), retinnopathy (eye damage), increased cardiovascular disease risk, potential for cancer progression (tumor cells feed on sugar) and bacterial or fungal infection. Unfortunately, whether due to a misinterpretation of what low carbohydrate dieting actually is or an “all-or-nothing” approach to restricting carbohydrates or perhaps the influence of low-carbohydrate-done-wrong diets like Atkins, many people (and especially athletes) try or attempt to try a low carbohydrate diet and end up messing the whole thing up, experiencing the Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Ever Woke Up With Their Kidney Area Hurting? ** Updated

Has Anyone Ever Woke Up With Their Kidney Area Hurting? ** Updated

Like you have to go to the bathroom bad. I am wondering if I am stressing them too much. Urine is strong and i am in ketosis. so maybe I am not drinking enough water? Thanks for the responses! It appears that I was VERY VERY dehydrated. I have to constantly remind myself to drink water not tea with cream ;) Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones are a known potential side effect of the ketogenic diet. Exogenous ketone supplements are a novel technology, so it is currently unknown if it could cause a similar problem, but it is possible. Clinically, potassium citrate is used to help decrease the risk of kidney stones (See here: including those that occur with the ketogenic diet. Potassium citrate is available commercially; however, as always, consumers should consult with their physicians before taking any supplements. Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [4] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% [5]. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Causes are Poorly Understood In the nephrology literature, kidney stones are a rather mysterious condition. Wikipedia has a summary of the reasons offered in the literature for high stone formation on the ketogenic diet [4]: Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons: Excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) occurs due to increased bone demineralisation with acidosis. Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. Hypocitraturia: the urine has an abnormally low concentration of citrate, which normally helps to dissolve free calcium. The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone formation. Many institutions traditionally restricted the water intake of patients on the diet to Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

The ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketotic, and only for a brief portion of the program. It has not been associated with kidney damage or disease in individuals who have normally functioning kidneys. Concerns regarding undue stress on the kidneys are often aimed at very low carbohydrate, very high protein ketogenic diets. Few studies have shown any actual damage, however. (Note: Although the Weight Loss portion of the ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketogenic, it is not considered to be exceptionally “high protein” for most individuals.) Dietary ketosis is among the most maligned and misunderstood concepts in nutrition medicine. Particularly among researchers who don’t actually treat patients, ketosis (the presence of ketone bodies in the urine) is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening build-up of ketone bodies due to muscle wasting and dehydration as in states of shock or uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Whereas patients in ketoacidosis are closely monitored in Intensive Care Units, individuals in ketosis are amongst the healthy, active population. Dietary ketosis is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. It would be diffi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

More in ketosis