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Can Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

MORE A type of low-carb, high-fat diet that's typically used to manage seizures for children with epilepsy could reverse kidney disease in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics, a new animal study suggests. If successful in humans, the so-called ketogenic diet could have the potential to replace dialysis, which is a procedure that artificially filters blood in place of a damaged or failed kidney, said study researcher Charles Mobbs, professor of neuroscience and geriatrics and palliative care medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. "I speculate that this may be useful to completely cure diabetic kidney failure , and I hope that it's possible," Mobbs told MyHealthNewsDaily. "If it's possible, we can potentially not require dialysis. That's a big deal." However, a lot more research in mice is needed before any studies can be done in humans, Mobbs said, let alone determine if the diet can reverse advanced kidney disease in humans, he said. "That's the first thing we want to establish in mice: Can we truly reset the clock? Can we completely correct the [kidney] impairments?" Mobbs said. Other experts say the finding is promising for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics with earlier-stage kidney disease, but more research must be done to provide evidence that the diet can make an impact on end-stage kidney disease , or kidney failure. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin (needed to move blood sugar into cells for energy) to control blood sugar levels, according to the National Institutes of Health. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels. Overweight and obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, according to the N Continue reading >>

High-fat Diet Is Awful, But It May Reverse Diabetes-related Kidney Damage

High-fat Diet Is Awful, But It May Reverse Diabetes-related Kidney Damage

A high-fat "ketogenic" diet may reverse the kidney damage caused by diabetes, a study published online Wednesday by the journal PLoS One reports. Past research has shown that lowering blood sugar through diet can prevent kidney failure but not reverse it in patients with diabetes. Lead author Charles Mobbs, a neuroscientist at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, said that this study -- in which mice were fed a high-fat diet of 5% carbohydrate, 8% protein and a whopping 87% fat -- was the first to show that dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse kidney failure caused by diabetes. "This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year," he said. That's hopeful news, but there's a serious problem: Following a ketogenic diet is brutal. A November 2010 article in the New York Times Magazine detailed one family's experience putting their young son on the diet to treat his epilepsy. The boy isn't allowed to eat such staples of childhood as cookies or macaroni and cheese. His mother has to weigh every morsel that passes his lips. At the time the article was published, he had been on the diet for almost two years. Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference? Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis

What’s The Difference? Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis

Ever come across these two terms while searching for healthy living tips: ketoacidosis and ketosis? If you’ve ever looked into the keto lifestyle, odds are you have come across both of these terms at some point. You may have also come across people who warned you about the dangers of ketosis. Sadly, there’s a massive misconception that nutritional ketosis brought on by eating low-carb, high-fat is the same thing as ketoacidosis… They’re NOT the same thing. Ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition where ketone bodies and blood sugar levels are EXTREMELY HIGH at the same time. Being in a state of nutritional ketosis brought on by a low-carb, high-fat diet allows you to burn fat for fuel instead of glucose/carbohydrates. In this state, our ketone bodies are elevated (about 3 mmol/l compared to the 30 mmol/l in ketoacidosis) and our blood sugar is LOW. Here’s the official rundown of the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. If you’re unsure about what ketosis or the ketogenic diet is all about, I highly recommend watching this video where I go in depth regarding what is involved in a keto lifestyle. My experience has been phenomenal! Here are some things that this keto lifestyle can help you with: Reduced blood sugar Increased HDL cholesterol Weight loss Normal cycle for women Overcoming hypothyroidism Overcoming bulimia Balanced moods Boosted energy Reduced cravings And more! If any of these are things you’re dealing with, you are not alone! I’ve dealt with these issues personally, and can say that keto has changed my life for the better! I also believe it can help you. Are there any other terms out there related to keto that you’re unsure about? Ask me in the comments! Continue reading >>

Are Ketogenic Diets Bad For People With Kidney And Liver Issues?

Are Ketogenic Diets Bad For People With Kidney And Liver Issues?

There is an international organization of doctors and other professionals who have clinical experience with ketogenic diets. It's called the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. They publish guidelines for safe use of ketogenic diets. The guidelines include a list of medical conditions (contraindications) which would make a ketogenic diet unsafe. At least one of the conditions on the list (carnitine deficiency) can cause liver dysfunction. You don't say exactly what sort of liver problem you have in mind. If you personally have a disease that affects the liver, maybe you should look at the list of contraindications carefully. Another condition on the list, beta-oxidation defects, can cause the liver to lack the ability to oxidize fatty acids. Regarding this condition the guidelines say, "An inborn metabolic error at any point along this pathway can lead to a devastating catabolic crisis (i.e., coma, death) in a patient fasted or placed on a [ketogenic diet]." Ketogenic diets increase the risk of kidney stones. Doctors often prescribe potassium citrate to people on medical ketogenic diets as a prophylactic measure against kidney stones. Here is a link to the full text of the guidelines. Contradindications are in Table 2. The title says "children" because virtually all clinical experience with ketogenic diets has been with kids. If you want to read more about the risks of ketogenic diets, click here to see a bibliography on my website (with many links to full text) of articles about risks and prevention. Some people seem to believe that ketogenic diets are harmless, risk-free, totally wonderful things. This isn't true. Ketogenic diets are like medications. They bring benefits but they also bring risks and harmful side effects. They involve tradeoffs. I'm not against Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Healing Naturally

Kidney Disease Healing Naturally

I just have to tell you, just to remind you, I am a type 1 diabetic and have been for 34 years. My kidney function has been going down gradually for several years including 4 points from June of this year to August. My GFR score was 42 in August, which I was told was stage 3 kidney failure. As of October 24 — I just got the results today — but as of October 24 my GFR score was 57 — 60 is considered normal. My kidney doctor said that he has never seen anything like that before and wanted to know what I was doing. I told him that I was doing a combination of a ketogenic diet and daily coffee enemas. He couldn’t believe his ears. I had to explain what each one of those things were. Anyway, I just thought I would let you know. Everyone is shocked that my kidney disease healing the way it is. And by the way, my HgA1C was 5.7 as of a week ago. Again almost into normal range which is my goal. Now, that is due to the ketogenic lifestyle. Oh, and by the way, I am going to see my “local” (80 minutes away) Maximized Living Chiropractor and getting great care. I have been really impressed with his office and “bed-side-manner.” I can’t believe all the things that he is doing to help improve my health. I have been to a few chiropractors before, but none ever even suggested they could do that. I told him that I had purchased your material on the ketogenic diet. He said that he knew you. His name is Dr. Josh Johnson. You may have heard of him. He said that he went to school with you. I thought that was pretty cool. Small world sometimes. Thanks again for all your help! Pastor Eric Sawyer Continue reading >>

Living With Pkd

Living With Pkd

Currently no specific diet has been proven to make your polycystic kidneys better or keep them from getting worse. It is, however, ideal to eat a balanced and healthy diet to maintain optimal body conditions. A healthy body is able to fight infection better, and bounce back faster. Accumulation of waste products filtered by your kidneys will build up in your blood as kidney function declines. At the more advanced stages of kidney failure (i.e. GFR <30-40 percent), significant accumulation of these waste products in your blood can cause symptoms of kidney failure. Should I stop eating protein? The major source of these waste products is the food you eat, especially protein. Therefore, when you have lost a significant amount of kidney function, a lower protein diet may be ordered by your doctor. Studies from both animals and humans with chronic kidney failure have shown that eating large amounts of protein may accelerate the progressive decline of kidney function. However, the Modification in Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study done by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked at protein intake and kidney function. The results did not show any benefit of lowering protein intake in individuals with PKD. At this time, there is no convincing evidence to suggest protein restriction as beneficial unless you are in kidney failure. Despite all of this, many consider it unwise to consume a very high protein diet. If you have moderate to advanced kidney failure, however, a modest restriction may be appropriate. For more information, you should consult your doctor and a dietitian experienced with kidney disease and ideally knowledge of PKD (also known as a renal dietician). Should I stop eating salt? High blood pressure in PKD does not seem to be caused by salt intake. Regardle Continue reading >>

How To Prevent And Treat Kidney Problems With Food

How To Prevent And Treat Kidney Problems With Food

Poor kidney function is associated with diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Common signs of kidney problems include frequent urination, problems urinating, and constant thirst Good kidney function is essential for maintaining homeostasis in your body, including your pH level and electrolyte balance; your kidneys also produce hormones that make red blood cells and regulate blood pressure Most Americans consume three to five times more protein than they need, and two to four times more fructose than is safe. These two dietary factors places significant stress on your kidneys, promoting kidney disease and stones By Dr. Mercola Your kidneys — two bean-shaped organs — are located just below your rib cage one on either side of your spine. Positioned on top of each kidney are your adrenal glands. Each day, your kidneys filter up to 150 quarts of blood and flush out waste products through your urine. One of the reasons why you need to drink enough water is to ensure healthy kidney function. In fact, chronic low-grade dehydration is one of the most common causes of kidney stones. Poor kidney function is also associated with a number of other serious health problems, including diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Common signs of kidney problems include: Frequent urination Problems urinating Pain or burning sensation during urination Constant thirst Good kidney function1 is essential for maintaining homeostasis in your body, starting with the composition of your blood. For example, your kidneys are responsible for maintaining proper pH level and electrolyte balance (the ratios of sodium, potassium and phosphates). They also produce hormones that make red blood cells, and those that help regulate your blood pressure. Dietary Factors That Threaten Kidney Health Wast Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Researchers have found that by administering a low-carb, high-fat diet in mice, that diabetic kidney damage was reversed, and also uncovered an array of genes associated with kidney failure. Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have for the first time determined that the ketogenic diet, a specialized high-fat, low carbohydrate diet, may reverse impaired kidney function in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They also identified a previously unreported panel of genes associated with diabetes-related kidney damage, whose changes in expression were reversed by the diet. The findings were published online in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE. Charles Mobbs, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience and Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and his research team evaluated mice that were genetically predisposed to have Type 1 or 2 diabetes. The mice were allowed to develop diabetic nephropathy, or kidney damage. Half of the mice were put on the ketogenic diet, while the control group maintained a standard high carbohydrate diet. The researchers found that after eight weeks, molecular and functional indicators of kidney damage were reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Microscopic analysis showed that kidney pathology in the model of Type 2 diabetes was partially reversed. "Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," said Dr. Mobbs. "This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year." The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high-fat diet typically used to control seizures in children with epilepsy. Many cells can get their e Continue reading >>

High Fat Diet May Be Able To Reverse Kidney Failure

High Fat Diet May Be Able To Reverse Kidney Failure

Scientists, in experiments with mice, have demonstrated for the first time that a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet called the ketogenic diet can reverse kidney failure caused by type 1 or type 2 diabetes. See also: A new exercise prescription for diabetes. If the findings can be replicated in humans, the diet would have profound implications for personal health and for the nation's health care, says neuroscientist Charles Mobbs of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. "This is the first study to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," says Mobbs, senior author of a paper published online in PLoS One on April 20. The mice, bred to develop type 1 or type 2 diabetes, were allowed to develop kidney failure, known as diabetic nephropathy. Then half were fed a standard high-carbohydrate diet while the other half ate a high-fat ketogenic diet, typically used to control epilepsy in children. After eight weeks, kidney failure was reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Their blood glucose returned to normal and the presence of the protein albumin in urine, a strong predictor of the progression of kidney disease, also was corrected. Controlling blood glucose and blood pressure slows the progression of diabetic kidney disease, but once the kidneys are damaged there currently is no way to repair them. If they fail, dialysis or a kidney transplant is the only option, experts say, which means that reversing the disease would be far more valuable than simply delaying it. "I believe that glucose metabolism in the cells drives diabetic complications," says Mobbs. "But controlling blood glucose levels alone doesn't correct the complications. We had to go beyond simply correcting blood glucose." In monitoring the Continue reading >>

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

The Hidden Dangers Of A Low Carbohydrate Diet

If you’re a frequent visitor to this website, or listener to the BenGreenfieldFitness podcast, you’ve probably gotten the idea that I’m a pretty big fan of limiting your carbohydrate intake. And you’d be right. To understand why low carbohydrate eating can bestow some significant health and performance advantages, check out my Perfect Health Diet interview with Paul Jaminet, or listen to the perils of constantly elevated blood sugar levels in this episode with Nancy Appleton: Which Foods Contain Hidden Sugar That You Didn’t Even Know About. Or go read about how physically active individuals may be able to actually benefit from strategic low carbohydrate intake in my article 4 Reasons To Think Twice About Eating Carbohydrates Before A Workout or (if you’re a Rock Star Triathlete Academy member) you can read 5 Ways to Get A Big Carbohydrate Restricting Performance Advantage. In a nutshell, pun intended, as you begin to increase carbohydrate consumption above the levels that you need for survival or periods of intense physical activity, you lose your ability to rely on fat burning mechanisms, and you experience the damaging effects of chronically elevated blood sugars, including neuropathy (nerve damage), nephropathy (kidney damage), retinnopathy (eye damage), increased cardiovascular disease risk, potential for cancer progression (tumor cells feed on sugar) and bacterial or fungal infection. Unfortunately, whether due to a misinterpretation of what low carbohydrate dieting actually is or an “all-or-nothing” approach to restricting carbohydrates or perhaps the influence of low-carbohydrate-done-wrong diets like Atkins, many people (and especially athletes) try or attempt to try a low carbohydrate diet and end up messing the whole thing up, experiencing the Continue reading >>

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

How Does Keto//os Affect Kidneys And Liver And The Role In Metabolizing Ketones?

As with all medium chain triglycerides, the MCT powder portion of the product will largely be converted to ketones by the liver within a few short hours of consumption. MCT create a readily supply of Ketone production for the liver to use for ketones. The BHB-salt portion should simply be absorbed into the blood as ketones. The BHB supplies another source, which doesn’t require the liver to produce ketones. There is no reason that the ketones produced by the product will affect the kidneys or liver any differently than ketones produced from exogenous fats (such as when eating a ketogenic diet) or ketones produced from stored fats (such as when calorie restricting or losing weight). Exogenous ketone scientific literature does not suggest that either kidney or liver function is negatively affected by ketosis. The major role of the kidneys when it comes to ketones is to excrete excess ketones in the urine. This excretion will likely be highest during the first few days of keto-adaptation (either in eating the keto diet or consuming KETO//OS), but the body will retain more and the tissues will begin to preferentially burn the ketones as consumption continues. The liver is the major site of endogenous ketone production, so taking exogenous ketones with KETO//OS would provide another source besides the liver to make ketones. Remember, KETO//OS and exogenous ketones are a source of calories; so be sure to consider it in your daily goals. KETO//OS and exogenous ketone supplementation is not hard on the liver. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Antidote To Chronic Renal Disease

The Ketogenic Antidote To Chronic Renal Disease

It is well know that one of the most profound complications of diabetes is damage to the kidney and the very small arteries within the kidney acting as your body’s filtration system. The kidney begins to lose the ability to adequately filter and retain microscopic protein progressively over time. As the blood sugar and insulin levels continually rise over time in the patient with diabetes or pre-diabetes, damage to the delicate filtering system of the kidneys occur. This very common and progressively damaging problem is called “nephropathy.” We knew in 1972 that patients with diabetes had thickening of the basement membrane or endothelium of the small tubles within the kidneys. In fact, 98.6% of diabetics tested had thickening of this area of endothelium and tubules also called the renal glomeruli (1). This allows the glomerulus or filtration system of the kidney to become more “leaky” and microscopic protein loss begins to occur through the kidney. This loss of important proteins in the blood is called “albuminuria” or “micro-albuminuria.” It is a flag that further damage of the kidney can and will occur without making significant changes to lower the blood sugar and the insulin. As of today, it is not totally clear how the basement membrane is damaged at the microscopic level, however, there is some evidence that elevated insulin has both a physical and immune type effect that stimulates oxidative stress, atherogenesis, immunoglobulins, as well as the formation advanced glycation end products leading to endothelial wall damage (2). Recent research reveals that a ketogenic diet effectively repairs and/or completely reverses the albuminuria (3). Evidence in my office of the significant improvement in micro-albumin can be seen in the one of a number of Continue reading >>

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

A s I walk down my hospital unit, on my way to the lunch room, I try to not be so conspicuous. The aroma of crisp fatty bacon leaves a trail of evidence that I simply can’t cover. In normal situations, I wouldn’t care if people saw me eating bacon. However, I’m a dietitian, and unless you are caught up on research, registered nutritionists should NOT be eating bacon. Explaining myself sometimes takes a lot of energy, and the last thing I need on my lunch break is a headache. Thus, I often chose my battles when it comes to explaining my low-carb, high-fat lifestyle. For clinical workers who are not up to speed, I may be viewed as a clinician who lacks integrity. Those of us who follow Carb Nite® or Carb Backloading™, know that simply isn’t the case, and in fact, quite the opposite. One of the biggest misconceptions I find is the thought that higher protein, or low-carb diets, cause damage to the kidneys. As I chomp on my bacon people often look at me with a dumbfounded look and ask, “Isn’t all that protein bad on your kidneys?” I thought this topic was old news. I was incorrect. It’s actually one of the most common questions, next to the saturated fat topic, that seems to keep resurfacing with whoever questions the low-carb lifestyle. It’s time to set the record straight. • Higher protein diets are safe for the general population. • There is a small population who may need to keep their protein intake at a minimum. • High-fat, moderate protein diets may have a protective effect in those with insulin resistance. It’s important to note the researched reviewed was not done on athletes; the recommendations made are for the average population. Higher protein diets are safe, for most people Research shows that high-protein diets may be harmful for Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

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