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Can Ketosis Cause Insomnia

How I Cured Obesity, Insomnia, Asthma, And Allergies Through Diet Experimentation (nutritional Ketosis)

How I Cured Obesity, Insomnia, Asthma, And Allergies Through Diet Experimentation (nutritional Ketosis)

**Disclaimer: I am not a doctor or nutritionist. Do not try this at home. Talk to a doctor before trying any new health routine. If you are going to self experiment, you MUST have studied the scientific literature. Not just blog articles on the internet. If you act on any information in this article you do so at your own risk.** Nutrition Science is in it’s early stages. Don’t get me wrong, medicine is advanced. This is because science is best at proving what doesn’t work, not what does. Nutrition science is about optimal health, harder to prove in the lab. Want an example? First we couldn’t eat eggs because cholesterol was bad. Now we can eat eggs because cholesterol is good. Enjoy this quote from The Skeptical Nutritionist: “Credible nutrition scientists have opposing views on whether omega 6 in vegetable oils is good for heart health. But who is right?” Here is another quote, I can’t remember who it’s from. “Nutrition science is the only science where researchers can hold opposing views, and both can be right.” So what can we do with our diets? I think the worst thing we can do is listen to all the noise that is out there on the internet. I actually think the best thing we can do is experiment on ourselves. EXPERIMENTATION AND OPTIONS. Forget the theory, try it. I will detail my own experimentation below that has yielded impressive results. I have lost 5 kilos so far. Just as important, experimentation leads to lucky accidents. I have, by accident, uncovered two major health issues that no doctor has ever been able to diagnose. These are long-term insomnia and life long hay fever due to allergies. Before I do that though, here is a practical guide for your own diet experimentation: Step 1: Choose a diet. Step 2: Stay on the diet for one month. Ste Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

What Could Cause Extreme Insomnia On A Low Carb Diet?

What Could Cause Extreme Insomnia On A Low Carb Diet?

it happens each time i attempt a ketogenic diet. i eat high-quality foods and that doesn't seem to matter. i also experience tingling arms and legs when trying to sleep on a low carb diet. anyone know what the problem could be? Continue reading >>

What’s Causing Your Insomnia And How To Fix It

What’s Causing Your Insomnia And How To Fix It

Insomnia can turn a normal, happy life into a waking nightmare. We’re not tired enough to sleep at night and too tired to get anything done during the day. Peeking at the list of causes below might reveal a simple, fixable culprit. Insomnia wears many masks. Some sufferers have trouble falling asleep while others drop off right away only to bounce up at 2 am. It makes us irritable enough to bite off loved ones’ heads. It leaves us tired, anxious and depressed. So what makes insomnia tick? In some cases stress is lurking in the wings. In others, diet or bad habits. Medications, medical conditions and aging can also lend a hand. Weapons in the war against the sleep-stealing sickness are changes in diet, daily habits and strategies to manage worry. Do Midnight Snacks Help Cure Insomnia? Midnight snacks definitely don’t cure insomnia. In fact the opposite is true. Eating late wakes up the digestive system and that can jazzercize your brain. Drinking a lot of milk or water before bed creates a double whammy, waking us when the bladder alarm begins to clang. Late eating turns the insomnia crankshaft especially hard in those with heartburn troubles. Lying down on a full stomach gives GERD victims a nighttime case of the burbles. That’s enough to wake up any sleeper. The Best Insomnia Home Remedy: Exercise Not tired? Get tired. Exercise can make us sleep longer and more soundly. According to the National Sleep Foundation, people who get at least 20 minutes a day of exercise sleep better. That means a better sleep and a more bright eyed, bushy-tailed feeling during the day. Exercise helps sleep the most when it’s done early. Nighttime workouts are a stimulant that actually works against our peaceful slumber. Don’t just exercise the body either. All kinds of activity Continue reading >>

Getting Better Sleep — Cool, Dark, And Lots Of B6, Carbs, Calories, And Fat

Getting Better Sleep — Cool, Dark, And Lots Of B6, Carbs, Calories, And Fat

recently posted some sleeping tips. A lot of other great bloggers write about sleep too, like Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, and Stephan Guyenet. I think sleep is really important, and I’ve had a lot of sleeping problems in the past, some of which I still occasionally struggle with, so I’m going to follow suit and post the things that have helped me most. Over a number of years, I’ve found that many things impact my ability to sleep, but from among these I can distill a handful of things I’ve found most critical: A cool, dark room. Light and phsyical activity upon waking. Lots of carbs, calories, and fat. Sufficient B6-rich foods. I need to have close to total darkness in the room when I fall asleep, and a sleep mask helps to prevent any residual light from reaching my eyes. A sleep mask does almost nothing if there’s lots of light in the room, as light on the skin seems to have a lesser effect than light on the eyes, but a nevertheless very meaningful impact. As my sleep has improved over the last two years, I’ve become less sensitive to light, perhaps because better sleep itself has begun normalizing my metabolic disturbances. But by “less sensitive” I mean that I can tolerate residual light sneaking in around the edges of curtains. I don’t mean I can tolerate no curtains or a light being on in the hallway, either of which would keep me up all night. I hope in the future my light tolerance continues to improve, as it makes no sense to me that humans are not designed to be able to tolerate at least the equivalent of moonlight and starlight. In addition to being dark, the room also has to be cool. I need a fan if the temperature gets much higher than 65F, and below 60F is ideal. I have also found that waking up at a regular time and immediately exposing mysel Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

Sleep Nutrition

Sleep Nutrition

Carbohydrates and Sleep Growth hormone and insulin have antagonistic effects: Elevated growth hormone levels will reduce insulin’s effectiveness, and high insulin levels will suppress the secretion of growth hormone. Therefore, repeatedly eating carbohydrate-rich food immediately before going to sleep may impair growth hormone secretion during your deep-sleep phase. Additionally, your body is more resistant to the effects of insulin at night, meaning that you must produce more insulin to move a given amount of glucose to your body tissues. This may lead to even further suppression of growth hormone secretion. Growth hormone secretion is an important part of the process of SWS, therefore going to bed with elevated or rising insulin will reduce the effectiveness of SWS that night. It is important to go to bed with low blood sugar so that you can maximize your growth hormone secretion potential and Slow Wave Sleep quality. Originally, there was a number of papers showing insulin increasing deep sleep, for example here and here. The obvious statement, then, is that if carbohydrates increase insulin then naturally carbohydrates increase deep sleep. This is a prime example of an ‘affirming the consequent propositional fallacy’. While healthy metabolism will raise insulin in response to an increase in carbohydrates, a healthy metabolism will not raise carbohydrates in response to an increase in insulin (glucagon does that). It therefore stands that carbohydrates do not necessarily increase deep sleep, and in fact insulin will lower blood-glucose causing hypoglycaemia when increased alone… A simple increase in ketosis, or food restriction replicates this increase in SWS without decreasing Growth Hormone secretion. In fact both low carb, ketosis and food restriction incr Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Insomnia

Insomnia

There is nothing like a good night’s sleep. It gives us the feeling of being refreshed and ready for the new day. Poor sleeping patterns contribute to depression and wide spread chronic diseases like diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Insomnia robs us of our ability to replenish our reserves so that we can remain resilient in the face of stress. Our body repairs and replenishes itself every night while asleep. We require a restful night’s sleep in order to build reserves to tackle the tasks of the day and to keep our immune system strong. Many of us occasionally suffer from a restless night. We toss and turn or wake early unable to return to sleep again. Some of us are losing sleep on a regular basis. If we are not able to have restful sleep it can lead to exhaustion, anxiety or depression and a feeling of being ‘wired and tired’. Problems with sleep can include not being able to fall asleep, waking many times during the night, and simply waking too early. There are many reasons for poor sleep. They include stress and anxiety, the use of stimulants like caffeine and nicotine, and poor sleep hygiene. Watching the evening news before going to bed is not helpful. Medical causes of insomnia include depression, hormonal imbalance, COPD, congestive heart failure, sleep apnea and chronic pain. Many medications that people are on can also lead to insomnia. High levels of cortisol or norepinephrine will prevent sleep. These are hormones produced by the adrenal glands. Stress can cause the adrenals to become over stimulated and produce too many hormones. Food allergies, such as to dairy, wheat and eggs, can also elevate levels of cortisol. If we have poor digestion or hidden infections we may have high levels of acetaldehyde or lactic acid in our blood which can act as i Continue reading >>

Eggs And Insomnia

Eggs And Insomnia

It isn’t well known that eggs (large amounts) can cause insomnia nor that caffeine — in special cases — can reduce insomnia. But a reader named BM recently made those discoveries: Back around July 2012, I was trying to improve my diet but I didn’t want to give up my vegetarianism, so I started to eat a LOT of eggs, usually in the range of 10 to 14 per day. Not long after, I started having awful insomnia. I could lie awake all night just unable to fall asleep. There were suddenly just too many thoughts buzzing through my head keeping me up. I assumed that it was a result of ketosis disturbing sleep. I tried reintroducing carbs, but when that didn’t work I gave up on dietary modifications. I started cycling through OTC sleep aids, but I developed tolerance to anticholinergics very quickly. By October 2013, I was going crazy. I couldn’t sleep well. It was making me depressed and seriously impairing my academic performance. I was exhausted constantly, but then I noticed something. I slept better when I consumed a lot of caffeine in the morning. I noticed there was a clear dose dependent relationship between how much caffeine I consumed and how well I slept. I had a hunch that the caffeine was depleting my acetylcholine levels, serving a similar function as OTC anticholinergics like diphenhydramine and kava. I wondered what would happen if I sharply reduced my intake of acetylcholine precursors. A lot of people advertise eggs as “choline packed”, so I cut back to less than 3 per day. Suddenly, I was sleeping much better. Now, it could be something else in the eggs (I’m not really attached to my choline hypothesis), but either way I feel confident blaming them for my sleep troubles. My insomnia returns whenever I start eating them again. I asked him why he h Continue reading >>

Keto Talk (episode 28): Cardiomyopathy, Nusi Hall Study, Diet Soda, Insomnia, High Blood Pressure On Keto

Keto Talk (episode 28): Cardiomyopathy, Nusi Hall Study, Diet Soda, Insomnia, High Blood Pressure On Keto

THE KETOGENIC COOKBOOK NOW IN U.S. COSTCO STORES If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam deliver some thorough answers to the most pressing ketogenic questions in Episode 28! KEY QUOTE: “If you suddenly turn down the glucose drive (by lowering the carbohydrates consumed) but you leave the protein high enough to stimulate glucagon, you’re gonna stop fat loss but still lose body weight (as water).” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 28: – Does a ketogenic diet lead to cardiomyopathy? I came across this reference that suggested that a ketogenic diet had been associated with cardiomyopathy: I wonder if you and the Doc have any thoughts on this. Thank you for your great podcast. Barry in the UK – NuSI-funded Study Serves Up Disappointment for the Continue reading >>

The Atkins Diet May Cause Insomnia

The Atkins Diet May Cause Insomnia

We already know there's a link between body weight and insomnia; now we're finding yet another potential link between your diet and the quality of your sleep. The culprit this time is the Atkins diet. The Atkins diet (officially called the Atkins Nutritional Approach) is a low-carbohydrate diet and this reduced carbohydrate intake is a potential insomnia cause. Although refined carbohydrates reduce the body's supply of vitamin B (used to produce serotonin) and are therefore best avoided, the Atkins diet drastically cuts your intake of all carbohydrates. Unrefined carbohydrates, such as pasta, porridge, brown rice, brown bread and sweet potatoes can actually help stimulate the body's production of serotonin - so by following this diet you're eliminating a major source of tryptophan and serotonin, which are the building blocks of sleep. Therefore if you're an insomniac currently on the Atkins diet, you may want to reassess your dieting options. Source: Mirror Improve your sleep in two weeks: Over 5,000 insomniacs have completed my free insomnia sleep training course and 97% of graduates say they would recommend it to a friend. Learn more here. Last updated: October 6, 2011 Continue reading >>

The Effects Of The Ketogenic Diet On Behavior And Cognition

The Effects Of The Ketogenic Diet On Behavior And Cognition

Go to: Experimental animal findings Ketogenic diet and seizure models Application of the KD to multiple animal epilepsy models has demonstrated therapeutic effects, e.g. KDs can increase induced-seizure threshold, delay seizure development, attenuate seizure risk and decrease the seizure severity (Maalouf et al., 2009; Todorova et al., 2000; Xu et al., 2006; Mantis et al., 2004). While careful attention has been paid to the effects of KD upon seizure activity, less is known about its effects upon cognition. Neuroprotective capacity of the ketogenic diet Data are available that suggest that the KD has neuroprotective effects that could be applied beyond its treatment for epileptic conditions. Several studies have demonstrated that KDs can enhance cognitive function in both pathophysiological and normal healthy experimental animal systems (Appelberg et al., 2009; Xu et al., 2010). For example, KDs were able to improve the motor coordination and cognition recovery in young rats suffering from traumatic brain injury (Appelberg et al., 2009). Pro-cognitive and memory enhancement effects of KDs have been demonstrated in normal, healthy, aged rats and to a lesser extent in young rats, suggesting that age may not be a confound for KD use (Xu et al., 2010). In a murine model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in which mice express a mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgene, KDs have been shown to attenuate the production and accumulation of the cytotoxic proteolytic products of APP, i.e. amyloid-β 40/42, that are thought to underlie the etiology of AD (Van dA et al., 2005). Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig’s disease), like AD, is a neurodegenerative disorder often linked to oxidative stress of neurons. Murine models of ALS, in which transgenic mice pos Continue reading >>

How Does Ketosis Cause Insomnia

How Does Ketosis Cause Insomnia

The first thing you might ask with this topic is what ketosis is. This term refers to our bodies using fat for energy. This means that your energy consumption is larger than your intake of carbohydrates in your food. Therefore, you have elevated levels of ketone bodies in the blood. If you are on a low carbohydrate diet you are likely to enter a state of ketosis. Then your body uses the carbohydrates from your body fat for energy. Epilepsy is sometimes treated with ketonic diet but low carbohydrate diets for weight loss are not usually recommended because they have negative effects on the health of the dieter. Diagnosis of Ketosis You can test if your body is in a state of ketosis from urine with the aid of Ketostix test strips. You also are likely to have a fruity breath if you are in a state of ketosis. Ketosis Insomnia Many people who have undergone ketosis because of dieting or other treatment have noted that there is an elevated risk of suffering from insomnia during ketosis. The insomnia is caused at least for some people by the low carbohydrate diet. What we eat has often an effect on how we sleep and, therefore, what we take away from our diet is also something that can affect sleep. Carbohydrates have a sleep inducing effect on some people. This is why taking away foods rich in carbohydrates can make it more difficult for you to sleep. If you have gotten used to eating sleep inducing food at bedtime it is easy to see why insomnia might be the result of dietary shifts. What to do with Ketosis Insomnia Ketosis is not a recommendable option for weight loss. If it causes insomnia too, it might be time to reconsider the diet. Talk it over with a qualified doctor in order to know if ketosis is a preferable option for you. Continue reading >>

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

In my last newsletter, I wrote about how most people with sleep trouble think they have too much energy and simply can’t settle down. I also discussed that one of the main causes of insomnia is actually a deep level of exhaustion. Odd as it may seem, the body needs energy to calm or sedate itself for sleep. Without energy, we stay awake, “wired and tired.” The second most common cause of insomnia is a silent blood sugar issue that affects one third of Americans. The worst part is, a shocking 90% of people are unaware of this problem until it is too late! (1) Could you or someone you know be suffering from blood-sugar-related insomnia? Keep reading to learn the facts about this troubling, little-known sleep issue. First Comes Stress, Then Come Cravings Sleep disorders affect an estimated 50-70 million Americans and, as I discussed in my last newsletter, much of this is caused by stress and exhaustion. When under stress, the adrenals go shopping for energy. Their favorite stop is the pancreas, where stress generates insatiable cravings for sweets to create the energy the adrenals can no longer provide. Before you know it, Americans are waking up to a sugar-laced cup of coffee or two. In an attempt to pick the healthy choice, we might sip green tea to keep us going through the morning. Lunch might be a salad and a diet soda. Then, as the blood sugar starts plummeting, bringing on the all-too-well-known afternoon crash, dark chocolate is passed around the office as if you had called room service. By the end of the workday, either a workout, latte or a nap is the only thing getting us home without falling asleep. The Band-aid Cure To remedy this, some of us have adopted a diet that was originally formulated for folks with severe hypoglycemia”the “six small meals a Continue reading >>

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