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Can Ketosis Cause Body Odor?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Why Do Low-carb Diets Cause Bad Breath?

Why Do Low-carb Diets Cause Bad Breath?

Individuals who practice low-carb dieting (Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, etc.) suffer disproportionately from Halitosis, or abnormally bad breath. Simply put, bad breath is the result of naturally occuring germs (bacteria) eating protein particles and then producing sulfur gases (bad breath). Because of this, high protein intake provides a feeding frenzy for oral bacteria which leads to increased production of volitale sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide. The goal of many high-protein, high-fat diets is to enter a state known as Ketosis in which fat is being burned for fuel in lieu of carbohydrates. The process of burning fat via Ketosis releases compounds known as Ketones, which result in foul smelling breath and can even cause general body odor problems. HOW TO GET RID OF BAD BREATH CAUSED BY HIGH PROTEIN DIETS The real solution is SmartMouth, which eliminates* bad breath and prevents it from coming back for at least 12 hours. Instead of just killing germs or eliminating existing bad breath sulfur gases, SmartMouth Oral Rinses actually block germs from eating ANY protein particles, thereby preventing them from producing new bad breath gases. Prevention is the key! LEARN MORE ABOUT SMARTMOUTH'S SCIENCE To Find Where You Can Buy SmartMouth CLICK HERE Or To Purchase SmartMouth Online CLICK HERE Before SmartMouth SMARTMOUTH ELIMATES BAD BREATH AND BLOCKS SULFUR-PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM EATING PROTEIN So how does it work? SmartMouth has two important solutions. The Sulfur Eliminating Solution contains an odor eliminator which eliminates existing bad breath sulfur gases. The Activating Solution contains zinc. When you mix the two solutions together, it releases a huge number of zinc ions. This zinc-ion technology blocks the Continue reading >>

6 Weird Signs Your Body Odor Isn't Normal & What To Do About It

6 Weird Signs Your Body Odor Isn't Normal & What To Do About It

There are a multitude of things that can affect the smell of your nether regions — your period, infections, poor hygiene. The list goes on and on. And while a lot of smells are totally normal, there are definitely some that are worth checking out. These are the more, well, shocking smells that are usually accompanied by discharge. According to Samantha Lefave on RedBookMag.com, "Having discharge alone is normal, yes. But having it come out clumpy or smelling like a trip to the raw fish market is not good, and it could mean a yeast infection, sexually transmitted infection (STI), or even chlamydia. As soon as you notice these symptoms, get to your gyno. Depending on your diagnosis, you'll definitely need a course of treatment." The sooner you get yourself checked out, the better. 5. Your Pee Is Super Stinky No one ever said pee smelled good, but it really shouldn't smell bad, either. As Lefave noted, "Normally urine is scent-less, or if it has a scent, it's usually a very subtle, ammonia-like smell ... So if you get a big whiff without even trying — and it's accompanied by pain, typically a burning sensation, when you pee — schedule a gyno visit. You could have a urinary tract infection (UTI) and will likely need to cycle through some antibiotics." While a UTI is more worrying, it's not the only cause for stinky pee. It could be caused by something as benign as what you ate last night. According to Lefave, urine smell is extremely variable, and can change with your diet. This is especially the case if you eat asparagus, which causes a pungent smell. Urine can also be a bit stronger when you're dehydrated. If that's the case, there's nothing to worry about. Just drink more water, and move on with your life. 6. Your Feet Wreak Stinky feet, medically known as "bromodo Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

What Foods To Avoid If You Want To Smell Your Best

What Foods To Avoid If You Want To Smell Your Best

No one wants to smell bad, but your diet can really have an impact on how you smell, whether it’s in your sweat, on your breath, or causing gas. Any of those issues can be pretty embarrassing. Here’s a list of what foods to avoid if you want to smell your best. Excessive Protein Those high-protein diets can leave you a little smelly if you’re replacing most of your carbs with meats, eggs, or protein powders. When you cut out a lot of veggies, fruits, legumes, and grains and eat a ton of protein to stay full, your body could go into ketosis mode to turn fat instead of carbs into fuel for your brain. Ketones, a byproduct of ketosis, show up on your breath and smell not-so-fresh (more like sour fruit). This doesn’t have to be an official type of “diet,” by the way, and eating a lot of protein in lieu of most other things could be done without even thinking about it (so remember to stay mindful of what you’re consuming throughout the day!). This way of eating could be a part of the Standard American Diet—lots of animal products and not much else. Red Meat Red meat in particular can keep you from smelling your best. In a study published in the journal Chemical Senses back in 2006, 17 males were put on a meat or non-meat diet for two weeks. Their sweat from the last day of the diet was collected, then 30 women (not on birth control pills), ranked their scents based on pleasantness, attractiveness, intensity, and masculinity. The study was repeated with the men on the opposite diet of the one they had before, and their odors were ranked again. The scent of the men who hadn’t eaten meat was ranked more pleasant and attractive, plus it was less intense. Dishes With Lots of Spices like Curry and Cumin We love spices for their flavor and health benefits and would Continue reading >>

Body Odor Ketosis

Body Odor Ketosis

Ketogenic Diet & Body Odor | LIVESTRONG.COM Ketogenic Diet & Body Odor. by JILL CORLEONE, RDN, ... But ketosis has a number of unpleasant side effects, including body odor and bad breath. View Ketosis Body Odor - The Ketogenic Diet for Women When you go into ketosis on the ketogenic diet, you may notice some strange body odor or smelly breath. Here's what's happening and what to do! View Body Odor and Ketosis - Treato Here you can read posts from all over the web from people who wrote about Body Odor and Ketosis, and check the relations between Body Odor and Ketosis View I'm a smelly girl: detoxing or in ketosis? Body odor can be a sign of a systemic yeast infection, which isn't anything uncommon or anything to be afraid of. Try cutting back to no more than 40 grams/day of ... View I'm a smelly girl: detoxing or in ketosis? Body odor can be a sign of a systemic yeast infection, which isn't anything uncommon or anything to be afraid of. Try cutting back to no more than 40 grams/day of ... View Body odor and Ketosis - Symptom Checker - check … List of 24 causes for Body odor and Ketosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more. View Body odor and Ketosis - Symptom Checker - check … List of 24 causes for Body odor and Ketosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more. View Ketosis, body odor, and a doctors opinion of IF. Thoughts ... This may be a long post, but I think it's kind of interesting. Here goes... So I began IF last fall. For me it wasn't very difficult at all to... View How to Detect Ketosis | 8fit Learn what the state of ketosis, how to check your ketones, about ketosis body odor and how to use and read ketone strips for measuring ketones. View Ketosis and change in body o Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet & Body Odor

Ketogenic Diet & Body Odor

Pills, powders, shakes -- Americans are willing to do whatever it takes to lose weight, even risk unpleasant odors emitting from their bodies. High-fat, low-carb diets such as the Atkins diet, also referred to as ketogenic diets, induce ketosis, which causes you to lose your appetite. But ketosis has a number of unpleasant side effects, including body odor and bad breath. Consult your doctor before starting a ketogenic diet. Video of the Day About the Ketogenic Diet The ketogenic diet was first introduced in the 1920s by Dr. Russell Wilder as a method of controlling epileptic seizures, according to Dr. Liu Lin Thio, assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine. Starvation had been used as a way of treating seizures since ancient times, says Thio, and a high-fat, low-carb diet mimicked starvation. The diet, however, is not meant to be followed for a long period of time and is deficient in a number of essential nutrients including B vitamins, vitamins C and D, magnesium, calcium and iron. Modified ketogenic diets, such as the Atkins diet, are less restrictive but produce similar results. The Chemistry Behind the Diet Normally, your brain uses glucose as a source of energy. Glucose comes from the breakdown of carbohydrates found in foods such as bread, fruit and milk. But during times of starvation, your body uses your stored fat for energy instead. The fat is broken down in the liver and made into ketones, then transported to the brain to be used as energy. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to get you into ketosis, which is characterized by high levels of ketones in your blood. For weight loss, ketosis prevents you from feeling the hunger pangs associated with most low-calorie diets, says Dr. John McDougall. Chemically, ketones are a type o Continue reading >>

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

Credit a complication of diabetes called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when your body runs low on insulin and your blood sugar spikes, says Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with type 1 diabetes generally experience it more than those with type 2 diabetes do. Here’s what’s happening: Your body can’t create the energy it needs to function properly, so it begins to break down fatty acids for fuel. This creates a build up of acidic chemicals called ketones in your blood. One of the main acids—acetone (the same component found in nail polish remover)—can leave a fruity smell on your breath, Dr. Gabbay says. You might not notice it until someone else mentions it, but doctors can smell it on you as soon as you walk into a room. The effects of DKA can be serious—even deadly. It can make you vomit and urinate frequently, causing your body to lose fluids at a dangerous rate, he says. DKA generally occurs with other symptoms of diabetes, like fatigue, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss, but in many cases, people don’t put them all together, which delays diagnosis and treatment. So if you notice the fruity odor on your breath along with any of those symptoms—especially if they are accompanied by fatigue, dry mouth, difficulty breathing, or abdominal pain, head to the emergency room as soon as possible, the American Diabetes Association recommends. After your doctor tests your blood for ketones, he or she will work on replacing lost fluids and getting your sugar levels back to normal with insulin treatment. Can’t seem to fight funky sneakers? A fungal infection may be to blame. If you notice dry, scaly skin around your toes, redness, and blisters, you may have athlete’s foot, ac Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Can Make You Smell Bad & How To Fix It

5 Foods That Can Make You Smell Bad & How To Fix It

Have you ever inched away from that person sitting next to you emitting a less-than-pleasant odor? What would you do if we told you that some foods might make you into that person? Yikes. Unfortunately, some of the foods that can bring on the stink are really good for you. But don’t worry: We have not only the foods to watch out for, but also expert advice on how to eat them without repelling your friends and coworkers. EGGS Eggs are a healthy eater’s friend. They’re versatile, inexpensive and loaded with good nutrition. But they aren’t winning any awards for smelling good. Their familiar unpleasant smell comes from sulfur, and it can be contagious, registered dietician nutritionist Maggie Moon, author of the MIND diet book, tells Clean Plates. And it isn’t unique to eggs; other sulfur-containing foods include onions, garlic, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower. Eliminating them isn’t a good idea since they’re some of the most nutritious foods you can eat. Instead, watch your portion sizes if you’re concerned about the smell, says Dr. Lisa Ashe, medical director at BeWell Medicine. She recommends sticking with a typical serving of cooked veggies (half a cup or a cup), but cautions against combining multiple offenders in a sitting, as smell worsens with quantity. So, you might want to choose either the onions or eggs to go with broccoli (or swap for ginger and chicken, to really lower the stink). OILY FISH One of the many essential nutrients in fish is choline–but it can have a disadvantage as well. “Choline containing foods such as eggs, beans, wheat germ, saltwater fish, and organ meats produce a chemical called trimethylamine (TMA), and some people can’t metabolize it, resulting in a fishy body odor that can be s Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

Foot Odor

Foot Odor

Foot odor is a problem that many people have to deal with on a daily basis. Often described as having a vinegar, ammonia or cheese smell, it can be an embarrassing issue with no easy solution. The primary catalyst is sweat. The human foot has around 250,000 sweat glands that produce up to 236mL (1 cup) of perspiration per day. Interestingly enough, sweat itself has no odor. It is sweat in conjunction with other factors that can lead to having stinky feet. Common Causes of Foot Odor Bacteria There are several types of bacteria associated with causing foot odor. The most common is Brevibacterium. Found primarily on the foot, it feeds off of dead skin. As it feeds, a gas known as methanethiol is produced. It has a sulfur like aroma that has been likened to that of cheese or rotting cabbage. Interestingly enough, Brevibacterium is used in the fermentation process of certain cheese. Propionibacterium is a rod shaped bacterium found mostly in the sebaceous sweat glands. It has the unique ability to metabolize amino acids contained in sweat into propionic acid. Propionic acid is commonly found in sweat and is recongnized by a strong, vinegar smell. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a bacteria not only found on feet, but over the entire human body as well. As it interacts with sweat, it produces isoveric acid which is known to have a cheese or musty odor. Skin Infection Keratolysis is a skin infection that results from prolonged wearing of shoes or boots in the presence of excessive sweating. It is caused by bacteria and is characterized by crater like depressions on the soles and toes. Keratolysis infections tend to have a sulfur like odor which is a result of the bacteria breakingdown skin. Contrary to popular belief, Athlete’s Foot does not generally cause foot odor. It’s a Continue reading >>

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