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Can Ketosis Cause Body Odor?

Why Do Low-carb Diets Cause Bad Breath?

Why Do Low-carb Diets Cause Bad Breath?

Individuals who practice low-carb dieting (Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, etc.) suffer disproportionately from Halitosis, or abnormally bad breath. Simply put, bad breath is the result of naturally occuring germs (bacteria) eating protein particles and then producing sulfur gases (bad breath). Because of this, high protein intake provides a feeding frenzy for oral bacteria which leads to increased production of volitale sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide. The goal of many high-protein, high-fat diets is to enter a state known as Ketosis in which fat is being burned for fuel in lieu of carbohydrates. The process of burning fat via Ketosis releases compounds known as Ketones, which result in foul smelling breath and can even cause general body odor problems. HOW TO GET RID OF BAD BREATH CAUSED BY HIGH PROTEIN DIETS The real solution is SmartMouth, which eliminates* bad breath and prevents it from coming back for at least 12 hours. Instead of just killing germs or eliminating existing bad breath sulfur gases, SmartMouth Oral Rinses actually block germs from eating ANY protein particles, thereby preventing them from producing new bad breath gases. Prevention is the key! LEARN MORE ABOUT SMARTMOUTH'S SCIENCE To Find Where You Can Buy SmartMouth CLICK HERE Or To Purchase SmartMouth Online CLICK HERE Before SmartMouth SMARTMOUTH ELIMATES BAD BREATH AND BLOCKS SULFUR-PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM EATING PROTEIN So how does it work? SmartMouth has two important solutions. The Sulfur Eliminating Solution contains an odor eliminator which eliminates existing bad breath sulfur gases. The Activating Solution contains zinc. When you mix the two solutions together, it releases a huge number of zinc ions. This zinc-ion technology blocks the Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Healthy Weight: Ketosis Can Cause Change In Taste, Smell During Weight Loss

Healthy Weight: Ketosis Can Cause Change In Taste, Smell During Weight Loss

Dear Dr. Baskett: I had bariatric surgery about six weeks ago and have already lost 40 pounds. I am finding it difficult to use the protein drinks as they now make me nauseated. After bariatric surgery — or even non-surgical weight loss — your weight loss is rapid. You are eating markedly less and typically your carbohydrate intake is down. Our usual source of energy is from carbohydrates, which give us glucose — fuel for our bodies to function. When on a low-carbohydrate diet, your body breaks down fat tissue for energy. This is a good thing and a desired result. What then happens is that you go into a state of ketosis. The body’s energy supply is now coming from ketone bodies circulating in the blood stream. These ketone bodies can affect your sense of taste and smell. This is why foods/beverages that were previously pleasing to you are not now. This state does not last as you will begin to introduce more carbohydrates into your eating plan; having said that, it is important to get in your protein requirements. If your protein intake drops, your body will break down your existing muscle mass for its nutrients needs and in time, your metabolism will slow down and your weight loss will stop. Keep trying to find protein supplements that you can tolerate. Increase your intake of yogurt, cottage cheese, string cheese and, of course, meat, poultry, and seafood. You may consider trying a non-flavored protein powder that you can put in your food and beverages. In addition, as you are able, increase your physical activity. Adequate protein intake and regular exercise will help facilitate further weight loss and help you to lose more body fat and maintain muscle mass. Dr. Kathleen T. Baskett is medical director of the St. Vincent Healthcare Weight Management Clinic and Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

I'm A Smelly Girl: Detoxing Or In Ketosis?

I'm A Smelly Girl: Detoxing Or In Ketosis?

Hi everyone, I've been eating partially paleo (everything paleo except I added potatoes and rice and once a week BAD chocolat) for a year. 3 weeks ago I left out potatoes and rice and started to eat more meat and fish and nuts instead, also a bit more good starches (pumpkin). Also I turned to eating organic only. I've also started to work-out every other day since 2 weeks, I did run before but didnt train my muscles. Since 5 days I smell horrible from my armpits! I first thought I was detoxing, getting rid of toxins in my body from drinking alcohol, sugar and non-organic food-chemicals. But my housemate suggested I might also be burning my muscles, which creates ketones. What do you think? My weight is 56 kg and I'm 1,70 female. How much grams fat, carbohydrates and proteines should I eat? As I'm doing a project where I live like a cavewoman in Amsterdam for 100 days (see What about Wilma), I can't drink proteineshakes - really just the stuff they had in paleolithic times. Thanks!! Continue reading >>

Your Low-carb Diet Is Giving You Disgusting Breath

Your Low-carb Diet Is Giving You Disgusting Breath

A diet that consists mostly of bacon, cheese, steak, and avocados sounds like a dream. A big, greasy dream filled with all the cheddar omelets and ribeye you could want. Deliciously fatty foods usually don't scream "healthy," but many people swear by these staples to lose weight. By eliminating all sugar and most carbs, and eating foods high in fat and protein, your body becomes a fat-burning machine, or so the theory goes. Win-win, right? Not quite. A big downside, other than missing sugar and everything in the bread family (RIP, bagels), is what these extremely low-carb diets do to your breath. By getting your energy from fat and protein rather than carbs, one of the common byproducts is intolerable stank breath, and it’s not because of the bacon grease. What’s causing that garbage mouth? Atkins, the ketogenic diet, and most other low-carb eating plans all rely on getting your daily calories mostly from fat and protein, and very little from carbohydrates. If you keep your carb intake to less than 30 grams per day, your body eventually enters a metabolic state of ketosis. Instead of breaking down carbohydrates to create glucose for energy, your body instead breaks down stored fat, which release ketones in the body. They are also released in your breath, creating a distinct odor that some keto enthusiasts describe as rotten fruit, or even metallic. "I lost 114 pounds on this diet but I had BREATH like acetone," one Facebook user commented on a story about the ketogenic diet. "I've had truly repellent, revolting bad breath," Reddit user LisaJA posted. "My friends and family have rated it about a 7 or 8 [out of] 10. My teenager has to open the car windows, it's that bad!" The influx of ketones may be the biggest culprit of your nasty breath, but there are other factor Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Body Odor

Does Ketosis Cause Body Odor

One method to assist manage these signs is to take in KetoLogic BHB-- an excellent tasting and hassle-free fuel source for those on, or transitioning to, a low-carb or ketogenic diet. Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

You’ve been on a ketogenic way of eating for a couple of weeks now, and you’ve stayed under your 20g of carbs every day. Congratulations on your dedication, your reward is… stinky breath? That’s right, most people who try keto at some point in the first month or so of being in ketosis will experience some unpleasant breath. Some people describe it as “metal smell” or having “metallic taste in the mouth”. What a fun reward for choosing a healthful way of eating! The Cause of Keto Breath The explanation is simple, though it’s usually unavoidable, at least until you’re fully fat adapted. As the body shifts into ketosis, it turns fats into ketone bodies, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. They are all completely normal and healthy to have in the body in the amounts it produces. These ketone bodies, especially acetone, can be detected by smell on the breath. This is actually one of the most reliable ways to tell when you have gotten into ketosis, and can be smelled more easily when you are deeper into this fat burning carbohydrate deprived state. Studies have shown this, and there are devices such as breath ketone test monitor that can measure the amount of acetone in your breath, and tell you the level of ketones that you’re producing (1). The science of this lays in the lungs, and the blood vessels that supply them. Since ketones circulate in the blood, they interact with the small air sacs in the lungs. As these ketones are exposed to the air in your body, they are expelled as a gas, with the distinctive odor of acetone. How Long Does Ketosis Breath Last? Some people never experience this phenomenon, even when they are doing the keto diet correctly and healthfully. Others experience it more as a taste than as an odour. For Continue reading >>

No More Dragon Breath!

No More Dragon Breath!

Too many people who eat low carb diets believe that they have to live with the intense bad breath nicknamed "ketobreath" if they are to keep their carbs down either to control their blood sugar or lose weight. That's because they believe that the bad breath is a sign that they are eating what is called a "ketogenic diet" which some dieters and low carb enthusiasts believe makes it much easier to burn off fat. The term "ketogenic" simply means "producing ketones." Ketones are a byproduct of fat digestion. They become significant when you are eating so few grams of carbohydrate each day because at that point most of your cells switch over to burning fats, including ketones, rather than glucose. You can tell when you have entered a ketogenic state because your body will dump a great deal of water when this happens, causing a weight loss of anywhere from two to six pounds within a day or two. When you exit the ketogenic state, those same water-related pounds come right back. Why this happens is explained in greater detail on this web page. Unfortunately, most people who cut carbs low enough to remain in a ketogenic state for more than a few weeks develop a distinctive and truly awful bad breath that they assume is a necessary part of eating a ketogenic diet. This is not true but widely believed. It is also the major reason why the loved ones of low carb dieter, after a period of patience, may start undermining the low carbers' diet, tempting them with carbs in the hope that if they ruin their loved one's diet they will no longer have to live with the wretched smell of that "ketobreath." This is rational behavior on the part of those loved ones. The bad breath--which the dieter usually can't themselves smell--is often so strong it makes riding in a car with the dieter unplea Continue reading >>

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

Credit a complication of diabetes called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when your body runs low on insulin and your blood sugar spikes, says Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with type 1 diabetes generally experience it more than those with type 2 diabetes do. Here’s what’s happening: Your body can’t create the energy it needs to function properly, so it begins to break down fatty acids for fuel. This creates a build up of acidic chemicals called ketones in your blood. One of the main acids—acetone (the same component found in nail polish remover)—can leave a fruity smell on your breath, Dr. Gabbay says. You might not notice it until someone else mentions it, but doctors can smell it on you as soon as you walk into a room. The effects of DKA can be serious—even deadly. It can make you vomit and urinate frequently, causing your body to lose fluids at a dangerous rate, he says. DKA generally occurs with other symptoms of diabetes, like fatigue, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss, but in many cases, people don’t put them all together, which delays diagnosis and treatment. So if you notice the fruity odor on your breath along with any of those symptoms—especially if they are accompanied by fatigue, dry mouth, difficulty breathing, or abdominal pain, head to the emergency room as soon as possible, the American Diabetes Association recommends. After your doctor tests your blood for ketones, he or she will work on replacing lost fluids and getting your sugar levels back to normal with insulin treatment. Can’t seem to fight funky sneakers? A fungal infection may be to blame. If you notice dry, scaly skin around your toes, redness, and blisters, you may have athlete’s foot, ac Continue reading >>

Body Odor – Disease, Chronic, Onion & Sour Body Odor

Body Odor – Disease, Chronic, Onion & Sour Body Odor

You are probably wondering what body odor disease is responsible for that offending small that just won’t go away. If that is the case, then read on to discover some of the medical conditions that are commonly associated with body odor. We have also discussed several types of body odor briefly including metallic body odor, vinegar body odor, sour body odor, ketosis body odor, and onion body odor. We sincerely hope that this article will help you make sense of the problem and possibly decide your best course of action to get rid of body odor. Do I have a Body Odor Disease Body odor is commonly attributed to poor hygiene, eating garlic and numerous spicy foods, taking some medication, stress and anxiety, or hormonal fluctuations associated with puberty and menopause. Some people are also genetically predisposed to body odor. Body odor is often however a sign of an underlying medical condition and as Kristie Leong, MD, a family physician in Virginia says, if one is dealing with a case of a body odor disease, “…no amount of personal hygiene care will cure the body odor problem”. Here are some of the common body odor diseases, so to speak: Diabetes: As the UK National Health Service says, diabetes increases an individual’s susceptibility to body odor. Diabetes is know to cause a change in the consistency of sweat such that someone’s smell changes. Often, the body of a diabetic person takes on a fruity smell, an indication of the high volume of glucose in their blood. Patients who are already on insulin to manage their diabetes have a distinctive body odor that smells like acetone. In uncontrolled cases of diabetes, the patient may develop a condition known as ketoacidosis which is noticeable for a distinctive body odor coupled with a sweet taste on the skin and a Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath Smell Information And Possible Remedies

Ketosis Breath Smell Information And Possible Remedies

One of the drawback to a ketosis diet is the bad breath that can go along with it. 13 Pins2.74k Followers Continue reading >>

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