diabetestalk.net

Can Ketones Cause Kidney Stones?

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

Like many busy people, David Crossley often used to find himself so wrapped up in his working day that he would go without lunch, and often barely stopped for a cup of tea. In fact, David, 63, a musculoskeletal therapist from Birmingham, admits: 'I would often be so busy at the clinic that I'd forget to drink any liquid at all, other than the odd cup of tea or coffee. It had been the same way for years - although I would drink more water at weekends.' Last year, this habit caught up with him. He noticed a vague ache in his abdomen, stretching around to his back. 'It wasn't agonising but it just didn't feel quite right, so I went to the GP,' he says. 'As I had some bloating, he sent me for an ultrasound.' This revealed two large stones in his right kidney - a direct result, his doctors believe, of his low fluid intake. A CT scan showed that the stones were so large (6 mm across) they could not be passed naturally, and he needed surgery. One in ten of us will develop a kidney stone, and the numbers are rising dramatically. They are the result of waste products in the blood forming crystals inside the kidneys, which eventually build up into a solid lump. They can be excruciatingly painful - on a level, say experts, with childbirth. The stones often remain symptomless while they're in the kidney. They start causing pain - known as renal colic - once they travel down the ureter, the narrow tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. 'Renal colic is caused by the stone suddenly blocking the ureter,' says Mr Leye Ajayi, consultant urological surgeon at the Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth, London. The pain often comes on suddenly and can cause the patient to 'writhe around in agony', he adds. The pain can be intense enough to cause nausea and vomiting. Once on th Continue reading >>

Does High Protein Intake Cause Kidney Failure?

Does High Protein Intake Cause Kidney Failure?

The role of protein in muscle repair and development is evident. Our body metabolizes a large amount of protein throughout a day. Some research claims that excess amount of protein metabolism can affect the kidney function. So far, there is no direct relation to excess protein intake and kidney damage. However, there are few hypothesis that points out the effect of excess protein on kidney function. Important role of Protein Some important role of protein in our body includes Make hormones Repair and heal tissues Produce antibodies and enzymes Fluid and electrolytes balance Foods high in protein includes eggs, chicken, cottage cheese, milk, peanuts, etc. In what ways an excess protein can affect kidney function? (Src) Metabolism of protein in our body produces some toxic element like ketones as a byproduct. Most of the time, ketones are eliminated by the kidneys. But sometimes they are left behind. These ketones can hamper the kidney function. It can also cause other complications such as dehydration, dizziness, fatigue, heart palpitations, and bad breath. Let see on what basis this is concluded. The Kidney function is measured by Glomerular Filtration Rate ( GFR). It determines how well the kidney is working or filtering the blood. Research have shown that excess protein filtration can affect the GFR rates. Also known as hyperfiltration. Over the long term, hyperfiltration may lead to acute renal failure. CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) (Src) The various Scientific report indicates that restriction of dietary protein in CKD patient can reduce albuminuria (albumin protein found in urine) and uraemic symptoms. Here are some CKD diseases that is closely related to the dietary protein intake. Proteinuria When kidneys are not functioning well, they cannot filter protein proper Continue reading >>

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Once upon a time, fat was the enemy of dieters. Nearly every product on the grocery store shelves had its “low-fat” version. Low-fat dressing. Low-fat cheese. Low-fat chips. Low-fat processed meats. Low-fat cookies. Low-fat freezer meals. It didn’t matter if the food itself was terrible for you and completely devoid of any nutrients (or even real food)… as long as it was “low-fat,” it was marketed as healthy for you. It was the way to lose weight for good. But then science begin to show us that fat wasn’t the enemy after all. In fact, eating plenty of healthy fats was the key to optimal health – and even sustainable weight loss. And today we have a diet rapidly growing in popularity that says, “Not only is fat good for you, you should be eating MOSTLY fat.” That’s right, I’m talking about the keto diet. Discover in just 7 short questions why you may be experiencing painful kidney stones and uncover how to return to your normal life. Take The Kidney Quiz Now! As with any unique diet plan, there are those who believe in it religiously and will “proselytize” to anyone who is listening. Then there are those who adamantly believe it to be dangerous. But one concern that pops up quite frequently from those who are skeptical is kidney stones. Can the keto diet encourage the formation of kidney stones? I’m here to help you examine that question. We’re going to learn more about the keto diet and what it does to your body. Then we are going to look at the science behind kidney stones and high-fat/low-carb dieting to see if the keto diet should be embraced or avoided if you suffer from kidney stones. What Is The Keto Diet? Though trendy now, the keto diet is not a new thing. It’s actually been around since the 1920s. In simple terms, the keto diet Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

Do Low-carb Diets Increase Kidney Stone Risk? Let’s Ask The Low-carb Experts

Do Low-carb Diets Increase Kidney Stone Risk? Let’s Ask The Low-carb Experts

People have all sorts of ideas about low-carb diets based on what they’ve heard somewhere or just on what they think they know about them. It’s why concepts like “artery-clogging” saturated fats still pervade our culture despite all the scientific evidence to the contrary. It doesn’t help that these myths surrounding healthy carbohydrate-restricted diets are perpetuated on a daily basis by so many so-called health “experts” in both the medical and nutrition fields and the general public is none-the-wiser to contradict any of it since they are merely living their lives and trusting the sources of information they are paying attention to. It’s what makes the idea of creating a cultural shift in thinking in favor of low-carb living that much more difficult–but it won’t deter me or the many others who are out here fighting the good fight to educate, encourage and inspire others to give livin’ la vida low-carb a try for themselves. I literally receive hundreds upon hundreds of e-mails daily from readers who are searching for answers to their questions about their low-carb lifestyle, help with weight loss, or managing some chronic disease they are dealing with. Although I’m not a doctor or nutritionist, I’m always happy to share from my own experiences to see if that information can be beneficial to the person who wrote to me. It’s my pleasure to hear from readers and to offer up assistance in any way that I can. However, from time to time I’ll receive an e-mail from a reader who has an interesting question that is beyond my scope of full understanding enough to share a detailed explanation of what’s possibly going on. It’s okay that I don’t know everything there is to know about nutrition and it’s relationship to being healthy. The good Continue reading >>

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

The ketogenic diet and ketosis are safe. Not only are they safe, but they are useful in helping people with many different conditions. The ketogenic diet has helped cancer patients, people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2), women with polycystic ovary syndrome, people with heart disease, and many others. So, where does the rumor that the ketogenic diet and ketosis may not be safe come from? Well, it starts with ketones. Rumors Spread Like Ketones in an Insulin Deficient Body One of the primary goals of the ketogenic diet is to enter ketosis (a normal metabolic process when ketones are produced for fuel). Ketosis is primarily regulated by the liver, which helps produce enough ketones to meet the body’s needs. However, ketone production can get out of hand when insulin is deficient, leading to ketoacidosis. This may be where the rumor that keto and ketosis are not safe came from. Ketoacidosis — A Serious Condition That Is Not Caused By The Ketogenic Diet Ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes. It is brought on by being born without the ability to produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or living a lifestyle that promotes insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes). In both cases, there isn’t enough insulin to tell that cells that energy is available (insulin deficiency). The lack of insulin signaling causes the fat cells and liver cells to go into starvation mode, even after a calorically dense meal. The fat cells begin to dump triglycerides into the blood to provide the other cells with energy because the cells are perceiving that there is no fuel available. Meanwhile, the liver starts mobilizing stored glycogen and using gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis to provide the body with sugar and ketones that it doesn’t need. All of this causes bloo Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Test Overview A ketone test checks for ketones in your blood or urine. Ketones are substances that are made when the body breaks down fat for energy. Normally, your body gets the energy it needs from carbohydrate in your diet. But stored fat is broken down and ketones are made if your diet does not contain enough carbohydrate to supply the body with sugar (glucose) for energy or if your body can't use blood sugar (glucose) properly. Ketones can be tested in a laboratory. Or you can test for ketones anywhere you may be by using home blood or urine tests. Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

It’s funny how our mental state really affects how we write and what we are interested in. When I wrote the introduction to this piece I was just getting settled into our new place in Santa Fe, NM and was looking at over a month at home to work and write. Then a number of wacky events happened and I’ve been home about 7 days out of the last month and I’ve only made it about 70 pages into Kon-Tiki. Ouch. Now I’m home for 8 days and will then be gone for a project that will take me completely off the grid for nearly 3 weeks. No phone, email…nada. When I sat down to do this kidney piece it was with a mindset that I had a ton of time and could really sink my teeth into it. Now I’m time crunched and anxious that I will get it done at all! Up front here I’d like to thank Mat “The Kraken” Lalonde with his help on some literature for this piece. Any inaccuracies however are my own tomfoolery. If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following: 1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE. 2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage. 3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage. 4-Many kidney issues have either a hyperinsulinemic characteristic, an autoimmune characteristic, and or a combination of autoimmunity or hyperinsulinism. A standard, low-ish carb paleo diet can fix most of these issues. 5-For serious kidney damage a low-protein, ketogenic diet can be remarkably therapeutic. 6-If you get kidney stones that are from oxalates, reduce your green veggie intake (spinach for example) and have other types of veggies. 7-If you get kidney stones that are from urate salts, you are likely NOT following a low-ish carb paleo diet, you likely have insulin resistance and your liver is not processing uric acid Continue reading >>

High Protein Diet Brings Risk Of Kidney Stones

High Protein Diet Brings Risk Of Kidney Stones

Diets heavy on foods that are high in protein and low in carbohydrates can increase the risk of kidney stones and reduce the body's ability to absorb calcium after just six weeks. These findings from a new study come at a time when an increasing number of Americans, seduced by anecdotal accounts of fast weight loss, are turning to low carbohydrate, high protein diets. Popularised by Dr Robert Atkins, these diets are having a revival after a recent cover story in the New York Times Magazine said that relying on diets heavy in carbohydrates and low fat products has caused people to hold on to fat, explaining a rising incidence of obesity and perhaps diabetes. Although low carbohydrate, high protein diets result in weight loss in the short term, they are less successful in the long term and may even be hazardous to health, researchers have warned. Protein rich foods can be high in fat, which increases the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Diets heavy in foods with low levels of carbohydrate, such as fruit and vegetables, can also leave the body hungry for essential vitamins and minerals, and insufficient glucose from carbohydrates, the body's preferred fuel source, can lead to fatigue and dizziness (American Journal of Kidney Diseases 2002;40:265-74). The researchers, led by Dr Shalini Reddy from the University of Chicago, found that six weeks on a low carbohydrate, high protein diet increased the acid load to the kidneys, raising the risk of kidney stones. Animal protein has been shown to boost urinary excretion of oxalate, a compound that combines with calcium and other compounds to form kidney stones. The new study included 10 healthy adults aged 21 to 52 who ate their usual diet for two weeks, then a low carbohydrate, high protein diet for two weeks, and final Continue reading >>

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Nowadays, often we either suffer from kidney stone problem or we hear that our familiar persons are suffering from kidney stone. Most of us even believe that the diet habits of low-carb can be the cause of this problem. Before going into the arguments we must know why do we have kidney stones? Reason for kidney stones Generally, kidney stones are the crystal hard mass that get its form in our urinary tract. Obviously, it is tremendously painful, especially when it goes by the thin ureter in the body. Kidney stones are of different types, but the exact cause of kidney stones are still unknown. It is also true some people are prone to get the kidney stones in their body. Thus, we are not sure that ketogenic diet kidney stones are interlinked. What is the ketogenic diet? A low-carb diet is also known as the ketogenic diet. In these diets, we get protein and fat. The ketogenic diet produces ketosis and this is a condition of the body in which it uses the ketones and fat to burn the fat molecules to make the fuel in the body. This is the basic source of energy or fuel. These diets control your appetite and support to burn the fat, as a result you lose your weight. Benefits of ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet means controls of protein, fat, and carbohydrates which you take as you can only consume maximum fifty grams of carbohydrates per day. These diets not only help to reduce your body weight, but it also helps in certain diseases like epilepsy or malignant brain cancer, etc. However, after having too many ketones in the body, your urine changes into acidic and this gives stress to your kidneys which ultimately changes into kidney stones. Thus, ketogenic diet kidney stones are having the link to each other. Some people who intake too much of meat, fish or poultry protein al Continue reading >>

Can Raspberry Ketones Cause Kidney Stones

Can Raspberry Ketones Cause Kidney Stones

::: Can Raspberry Ketones Cause Kidney Stones : Raspberry Ketones Max Weight Loss Pill Raspberry Ketones Max Weight Loss Pill Can Raspberry Ketones Cause Kidney Stones Raspberry Ketones Max is the latest weight loss discovery to take television health programs and online health news sites by storm. Until now, you'd have to eat thousands of Raspberries just to get enough of the Ketone enzyme to help fight fat, but now scientists have isolated that element and extracted it into a supplement that lets you get 300mg of Raspberry Ketone in every serving of Raspberry Ketone Max. In studies on rats, Raspberry Ketones helped prevent the onset of obesity in mice that were on a high fat diet. They also prevented an increase in blood triglyceride following high fat meals. That translates into Raspberry Ketones not only helping prevent the onset of obesity, but also preventing fat storage as well. Can Raspberry Ketones Cause Kidney Stones The Science Behide Raspberry Ketones Max Raspberry Ketone Max is the latest weight loss discovery to take television health programs and online health news sites by storm. Until now, you'd have to eat thousands of Raspberries just to get enough of the Ketone enzyme to help fight fat, but now scientists have isolated that element and extracted it into a supplement that lets you get 300mg of Raspberry Ketone in every serving of Raspberry Ketone Max. Research has shown that raspberry ketone can help in your weight-loss efforts, especially when paired with regular exercise and a well-balanced diet of healthy and whole foods. Raspberry ketone is the primary aroma compound of red raspberries. This compound regulates adiponectin, a protein used by the body to regulate metabolism. Raspberry ketone causes the fat within your cells to get broken up more eff Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones are a known potential side effect of the ketogenic diet. Exogenous ketone supplements are a novel technology, so it is currently unknown if it could cause a similar problem, but it is possible. Clinically, potassium citrate is used to help decrease the risk of kidney stones (See here: including those that occur with the ketogenic diet. Potassium citrate is available commercially; however, as always, consumers should consult with their physicians before taking any supplements. Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

A patient recently asked me how bad being in nutritional ketosis was for her. I responded that the worse problem I’ve seen recently is the patient that broke his toe when he slipped on bacon grease. Are there risks with a ketogenic diet? Yes, but these usually only occur when you cheat or fall off the wagon. What problems can arise? Lets talk about them individually. First, as I stated above, make sure you don’t slip on bacon the grease. It really can be an issue if you’re not used to using increased amounts of fat in your kitchen. So, be prepared for how to cook and use fat. Grandma understood this well, we could learn a great deal from her if you ask her about using bacon grease. Second, let’s define the difference between ketosis and keto-acidosis and try to clarify the misinformation that is being spread around the blogosphere. A ketone is a molecule the body produces from the breakdown of fat (specifically triglycerides) and some proteins (amino acids). There are specifically three types of ketones: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, acetoacetic acid and acetone. If ketosis was “bad,” then why would our bodies produce these molecules? They are not bad, and in fact, multiple studies show that the body is often more efficient in weight loss, inflammatory reduction, bowel function, epigenetic influence and maintenance of lean body mass more effectivly when it functions on ketones rather than glucose as its primary fuel source. You can see these studies here, here, here and here. The body can only supply a limited amount of sugar or glucose for fuel. If you talk to runners, marathoners or triathletes, they will tell you that after about 45-90 minutes of continuous endurance exercise the glucose supply runs out and they will experience what is termed a “bonk” (ha Continue reading >>

More in ketosis