diabetestalk.net

Can Ketoacidosis Kill You

Pumper's Voice

Pumper's Voice

Pumping Pitfalls Avoiding and dealing with pump-related problems For anyone who uses an insulin pump, there are bound to be occasional problems. For some, problems may be as rare as a Chicago Cubs’ World Series victory; for others they may occur as often as a Hollywood scandal. Insulin pumps, being mechanical devices, are subject to mishaps that can result in interruptions or irregularities in insulin delivery or action. When too little insulin is being infused into your body, high blood sugar will occur. When absorption is inconsistent, highs and lows can occur. And if no insulin is being delivered, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can occur in just a few hours. Fending Off DKA DKA is a serious condition that will make you very ill and can kill you. The primary cause of DKA is a lack of working insulin in the body, accompanied by dehydration. When you are using an insulin pump, there is no long-acting insulin present in your body. Any interruption in insulin delivery can result in a sharp rise in blood sugar and ketone production can start as soon as three hours after the last bit of insulin was infused. The most important step in preventing ketoacidosis is early detection of the problem. You accomplish this by checking for ketones with any unusually high blood sugar levels. Everyone on a pump should be prepared to test for ketones and you can do this by way of a urine dipstick (ketostix or ketodiastix) or a fingerstick blood sample (Precion Xtra meter from Abbott). Positive ketones are indicated by either of the following: • Urine testing that indicates small, moderate or large levels of ketones (³15 mg/dl) • Blood testing that indicates the presence of b-Hydroxybutyrate (³.6 mmol/l) If your ketone test shows negative or trace amounts, your high blood sugar is prob Continue reading >>

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

Hannah Postles discovered she had type 1 diabetes after going to A&E with blurred vision. It wasn’t her only symptom. For the previous three weeks, she’d been thirsty, drinking two bottles of water at lunch, had lost weight and felt run down. Scroll down for video ‘My boss suggested I might have diabetes after looking up my symptoms online, but my GP seemed to dismiss it because of my age,’ says Hannah, a press officer for the University of Sheffield. ‘I was 26 and most type 1 diabetics are diagnosed in childhood.’ Luckily, Hannah spoke to a doctor friend who told her to go to A&E, where she was tested for diabetes, and immediately put on an insulin drip. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t make insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Typically, people with type 1 diabetes are diagnosed around the age of 12 — although occasionally adults are diagnosed in later life. Type 2 diabetes, which can be diagnosed at any age, occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin itself does not work properly. Not only did Hannah have diabetes, her blood sugar levels were so out of control by the time she was diagnosed that she had developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition when blood glucose levels remain persistently high for days or weeks. The condition can be caused by illness or infection or by the mismanagement of diabetes — which, as Hannah, now 29, discovered, can be the result of not knowing you have it. Symptoms include vomiting, headaches, abdominal pain and, if left too long, coma and even death. Had Hannah not gone to A&E, she might have died. In July 2012, new mother Nicky Rigby, 26, from the Wirral, did die from undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. She’d assumed her chronic tiredness a Continue reading >>

First Aid For People With Diabetes

First Aid For People With Diabetes

The prevalence of diabetes increased 382% from 1988 to 2014. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, this growth correlates with the upsurge of visits to the emergency room from people in a life-threatening diabetic crisis. As the condition continues to rise so does the likelihood of providing first aid for someone with diabetes. Understanding Diabetes First-aid providers have important choices to make before providing care to a diabetic. The best way to effectively manage a diabetic emergency is through understanding the mechanisms behind the medical condition. Every cell in the body requires glucose as a foundation of energy. People with diabetes, though needing glucose, have an inability to process, or metabolize, it efficiently because the pancreas is either producing too little insulin or none at all—either way, glucose can accumulate to dangerously high levels. A healthy pancreas regulates the production of insulin proportionate to the amount of glucose in the blood. Classification of Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is primarily an autoimmune condition manifesting in children and young adults. These people do not produce insulin; they require routine injections of insulin to aid in glucose metabolism. Without insulin injections type 1 diabetics cannot use the sugar in their blood for energy. People with Type 2 diabetes produce small amounts of insulin, or they cannot properly use the insulin hormone, also known as insulin resistance. This condition usually develops later in life. Many people with type 2 diabetes use diet, exercise, and other non-insulin medications. Some Type 2 diabetics however, may require supplemental insulin. What is a Diabetic Emergency? With six million people using insulin in the United States, the incidence of too much or too litt Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

When Does Diabetes Kill The fear experience of diabetic ketoacidosis the truth behind my encounter with what is dka? Diabetes daily. In respiratory distress and it is what can kill, according to holly brewer, ms rd cde how the diabetic ketoacidosis you check. Diabetes mellitus How long does diabetes take to kill you if it is not treated? . Doc james (talk email contributions) 02 44, 16 July 2009 (utc). Most body cells mainly burn sugar (glucose) for energy. November 19, 2009 dka occurs when there is insufficient insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. In emergency care with the dangers of severe hypoglycemia why is diabetes so dangerous can you manage your diet with ketogenic? . This can happen if you have type 2 diabetes, ketoacidosis is rare, but you may experience very high failure to reach the site of infection fast enough to gobble and kill bacteria. Illness and diabetes research and wellness foundation. The problem comes when you have diabetes and insufficient insulin to move glucose from your bloodstream into the body's cells. August 30, 2016 is a serious condition that will cause you to violently ill can kill. Diabetic ketoacidosis diabetes self management. Myths of diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) r. How diabetic ketoacidosis kills you for a moment bothered me when I read about a strange guy who has her husband (55) newly diagnosed with adult onset diabetes are happy to be sneaky and see their partner slowly himself; I rebelled against from the age of 12 until I met mr at the age of 17, November 2, 2015 myth # 1 we should get abgs instead vbgs in dkaso do literature review meet two studies that specifically 13 of 2010 patients type 1 hypoglycemia frequent episodes can not only ruin, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Diabetic Nonketotic Diabetes

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Diabetic Nonketotic Diabetes

Sort What are 9 clinicopathic abnormalities associated with diabetic ketoacidosis? Hyperglycemia and glycosuria Hyperketonemia and ketonuria Hypobicarbonatemia Elevated liver enzymes Hypokalemia Leukoctosis Anemia Hyponatremia Hypophosphatemia Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die. “Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones. Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight. “When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It? But too many ketones are a problem. “In individuals with diabetes who have no or low insulin production, there is an overproduction of ketones, and the kidneys can’t get rid of them fast enough,” sa Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Dangerous? No, Because Ketosis Is Not Ketoacidosis.

Is Ketosis Dangerous? No, Because Ketosis Is Not Ketoacidosis.

At this point, I consider myself pretty immune to what internet trolls say to me. I have a pretty tough skin, usually laugh off nonsensical comments, and carry on with my day. This last time was different. When checking the social media account for my ketosis supplement company, Perfect Keto, I noticed a rather ridiculous comment. To the best of my memory, the comment said something like this: “How dare you promote ketosis?! I HATE KETOSIS! My daughter is a diabetic and had to be brought to hospital the other day because she was in ketoacidosis! Shame on you and everyone like who you recommends a dangerous diet that kills people! You are killing people! AGHHH!” Not only is this comment wildly misinformed and ignorant, I think comments like this are more dangerous than the promoting the ketogenic diet. When people make comments like this, they use the same scare tactics and lack of facts that have recently overtaken our political system to influence people in not using very beneficial tools to their advantage. Sometimes you just have to use your brain. The unfortunate truth is that this lady isn’t the only delusional and misinformed one instilling fear into people who are trying to gain benefit from their nutritional choices. Plenty of mainstream doctors also think the ketogenic diet is life threatening. I’ve recommended the ketogenic diet to many of my patients trying to fix weight and metabolic issues they haven’t been able to correct for years. One of them mentioned this change to their primary care physician, who was reviewing the statins and several other medications they have this patient on, who reacted with disbelief. Ketosis! How could I recommend such a life threatening intervention?! They were told not to see such a quack like myself any more before Continue reading >>

In Defense Of Fasting: Common Misconceptions

In Defense Of Fasting: Common Misconceptions

Clearing misconceptions For those of you wondering, the tone of this article has been highly edited from my anger-rant earlier. I used my blog as catharsis, but now it’s back to business. I get a message across better being polite anyway. Fasting is a fairly unique diet technique. It’s at a crossroads (more like highway junction) of efficacy, health, social perception, eating disorders, and overall safety. It’s not bad given you avoid a few pitfalls and don’t blatantly starve yourself, but some people are still caught up in the midst of all this confusion, not knowing whether not eating for a single day will hurt them or help them. This article is subject to editing in the future. I am using this to keep tabs on the current science of fasting, both good and bad. It might be nice to keep it bookmarked and come back to it from time to time. I also suspect some time in the future it might become Tl;Dr, but a valuable tool nonetheless. This can be used in drug testing also and because of this some people have found a way to access synthetic urine. One of the most popular sites is Since fasting is put on ‘trail’ a lot, I figured I might bring up the common arguments like a court case. Just for kicks. Exhibit A: Ketosis and Ketoacidosis First, definitions: Ketosis is the state of an organism characterized by elevated serum levels of ketones Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state characterized by uncontrolled production of ketone bodies and decreased serum pH Ketosis is the presence of ketones, ketoacidosis is the presence of ketones combined with a drop in pH. The drop in pH is due in part to overproduction of ketones (which are acidic in nature) and a failure of the body/diet to buffer said acidity. So from this, we can preliminarily conclude that ketoacidosis will ki Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Duck Dodgers October 14, 2014 Peter, An article by Per Wikholm was published in this month’s LCHF Magasinet, where Per demonstrates that the Inuit could not have been in ketosis given that the scientific literature is abundantly clear, over and over again, that the Inuit consumed too much protein, and more importantly, Per debunks Stefansson’s claims for high fat with writing from his own books—Stef admitted in the pemmican recipes that Arctic caribou was too lean to make pemmican that supported ketosis. The most popular LCHF bloggers in Sweden, Andreas Eenfeldt/Diet Doctor and Annika Dahlquist have reluctantly agreed with Per’s findings—admitting that the Inuit were likely not ketogenic from their diet. I’ve put together a comprehensive review of the scientific literature regarding the Inuit, encompassing over two dozen studies, spanning 150 years, with references from explorers, including Stefansson. In the comments section of that post, Per gives a brief overview of how he was able to prove Stefansson’s observations on high fat intake were flawed. The post is a review of all the available literature that I could find (over two dozen studies). But, the literature certainly does not in any way support ketosis from the Inuit diet due to such high protein consumption. As Per (and Stefansson) points out, the caribou is too lean and as the many quotes show, the Inuit were saving their blubber and fat for the long dark Winter to power their oil lamps and heat their igloos. Again and again, we see that in the literature, as even Stefansson admits this. As far as glycogen is concerned, their glycogen intake is probably not worth scrutinizing given the well-documented high protein consumption in every published study. It really is besides the point. But, interest Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

There’s a common saying in the diabetes community that diabetes won’t kill you, but it’s complications will. Still, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, with over 69,000 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death. [1] Add to that the common complications, like cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and infection, and you can multiply that number by 10! Yet despite these eye-opening statistics, I still see far too many people not taking diabetes seriously. They approach it as something that’s a nuisance rather than something that can and does cause major health complications, and yes even death, if uncontrolled. “Sometimes I pretend I’m not diabetic, but that’s a dangerous game.” – Unknown Diabetes is more dangerous than most people assume, and so it becomes easy for many people with diabetes to get lax in their efforts to manage the dysfunction. A 2012 GAPP2 (Global Attitude of Patients and Physicians 2) survey found that 22% of insulin-using diabetic patients missed a basal insulin dose during a 30-day period. [2] There are very real dangers diabetes poses if left unchecked or mismanaged, and one of my goals today is to motivate you into taking better care of yourself or helping a loved one manage the disease better. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Because if not managed correctly, it can wreak havoc on just about every system and organ in the body. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest risks diabetic complications pose: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that can occur when patients neglect to take their insulin and have uncontrolled blood sugar. Since insulin is necessary to break down glucose as a sourc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats

Diabetic ketoacidosis requires urgent veterinary treatment. With ketoacidosis, the lack of insulin causes the body to burn fat and muscle creating ketones. The kidneys are unable to filter all of the ketones from the blood. As a result, these ketones build up in the bloodstream, turning the blood extremely acidic. This is a dangerous stage of diabetes that causes blood chemical and blood sugar imbalances, and also impairs brain function. Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis can lead to diabetic coma and death. Understanding Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus is more commonly referred to as diabetes. With this disease, the feline's pancreas fails to properly regulate the flow of insulin within the body. Without the proper levels of insulin, the cat eats more, but fats and protein break down into energy, so the cat loses weight. Sugar levels within the blood skyrocket and are released in the urine. Cats often require insulin injections to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. With non-insulin dependent diabetes, diet, weight loss and exercise may be enough to keep blood sugar levels down. If a cat's blood sugar levels are properly monitored, a cat with diabetes is unlikely to face any serious health issues. If diabetic ketoacidosis does occur, call your vet immediately. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The most common signs of ketoacidosis in cats are excessive thirst and frequent urination. However, you should also watch for: Breath smells of nail polish remover/acetone Excessive appetite Vision changes/blindness Vomiting Weakness Weight loss Ketoacidosis can occur with an infection or illness. It can also happen if the insulin amounts need altering. Your vet will find a cause and create a new treatment plan you will follow at home. Diagnosis and Treatment When you bring Continue reading >>

More in ketosis