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Can Ketoacidosis Kill You

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Why Does Diabetes Cause Rapid Weight Loss?

So, I’m going to assume that you’re talking about type 1 diabetes. There are two types of diabetes that are distinctly different metabolic disorders. The answer to your question is the effects of insulin in the body. When type 1’s lose their production of insulin, their bodies no longer are able to store fat or even utilize what blood sugar is being produced by the body. This causes the body to basically consume first fat and then even lean muscle mass. If you look at left hand picture of this type 1 before the discovery of insulin you’ll see the emaciated look of someone starving. The picture on the right shows a more normal body weight after insulin injections were started. So, for type 1’s the lack of insulin can cause rapid weight loss. The lack of insulin causes the body to start basically eating itself. Type 2’s can lose weight if their bodies stop producing insulin; however, for most type 2’s things work in reverse. They have a problem of insulin resistance caused by too much insulin in their system. Too much insulin normally causes the type 2’s to store fat and gain weight. That’s the connection between type 2 diabetes and obesity. Continue reading >>

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  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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DKA and HHS (HHNS) nursing NCLEX lecture review of the treatment, patient signs/symptoms, and management. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemia nonketotic syndrome are two complications that can present in diabetes mellitus. DKA is more common in type 1 diabetics, whereas, HHNS is more common in type 2 diabetics. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis will present with ketosis and acidosis and signs/symptoms will include hyperglycemia (greater than 300 mg/dL), Kussmaul breathing, fruity (acetone breath), ketones in the urine, and metabolic acidosis. Patients with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome will NOT have ketosis or acidosis but EXTREME hyperglycemia (greater than 600 mg/dL). In addition, hyperosmolarity will present which will cause major osmotic diuresis and the patient will experience with severe dehydration. Quiz on DKA vs HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Diabetes NCLEX Review Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Video on DKA (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxrCV... Video on HHNS (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyExA... Subs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Diabetic Nonketotic Diabetes

Sort What are 9 clinicopathic abnormalities associated with diabetic ketoacidosis? Hyperglycemia and glycosuria Hyperketonemia and ketonuria Hypobicarbonatemia Elevated liver enzymes Hypokalemia Leukoctosis Anemia Hyponatremia Hypophosphatemia Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Transcript: Dr. Joseph Aloi On Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Glucommander Software

This interview is also available as a video: click here to view. Dr. Joseph Aloi, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC. Steve: This is Steve Freed with Diabetes in Control and we’re here at AACE 2016 and we have with us a special guest who’s been working on some unique projects that we’d like to share with you. Maybe you can start off and tell us a little bit about your background, where you’re at and what kind of practice you have. Dr. Aloi: I’ve been in academic medicine for the last 25 years. I worked in three hospital systems. I started at the University of Virginia and then migrated to Eastern Virginia Medical School, which a lot of the data we’re presenting came through that relationship. And most recently I’m now at Wake Forest where I’m chief of the endocrine section there. But I’ve been working in the area of in-patient glycemic management for about the last 10 years. Steve: Because I noticed on one of your posters that you’re using this new software, fairly new software, to help treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Dr. Aloi: Correct. Steve: How does that work? Dr. Aloi: Patients coming in with diabetic ketoacidosis generally are treated with I Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. road hog

    my dog of 7 has been unwell and has spent most of the weekend at the vets (£400 )a night stay.(not that i begrudge paying)
    what i am wondering is if any other dog folk have a diabetic dog and what to expect or any advice ,seems he is improving abit (flattened the pup of 1 year after his breckie)
    going to have to give him 2 insulin jabs a day . ?
    is this only available thru the vets ..?
    here he is with his older (bigger brother)
    [url]|http://thumbsnap.com/v/xrEUV3Xp.jpg[/u

  2. sonic_2k_uk

    He has type 1 diabetes which is insulin dependent. I'm pretty sure its treated the same in dogs as humans, so yes insulin injections will be required.
    Ketoacidosis happens with diabetes when there is not sufficient insulin to reduce the rate at which the liver breaks down fat.
    When the live burns fat it produces ketones. As the liver runs away burning fat without the insulin to control it, the body effectively poisons itself as your blood turns acidic.
    Having had ketoacidosis, i can say its seriously not nice! I'm pretty sure you'd die of dehydration before the ketones killed you though.
    Ketoacidosis is completely treatable is caught in time though, you need to control the level of insulin correctly, reducing the blood sugar level and controlling the liver, replace the lost fluids flushing the ketones out of the blood, basically

  3. road hog

    he seems to be drinking and urinating alot , will this be flushing the "ketones" out of his system,
    sleeping alot and getting spoilt (laid out on settee).
    just been doing some internet surfing and hadnt realized how serious it was .could have lost him on friday night.
    Edited by road hog on Sunday 7th March 13:47
    picture taken on thursday night....really ill but still wanted to kill the zebra.
    Edited by road hog on Sunday 7th March 13:49

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