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Can Ketoacidosis Kill You

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Duck Dodgers October 14, 2014 Peter, An article by Per Wikholm was published in this month’s LCHF Magasinet, where Per demonstrates that the Inuit could not have been in ketosis given that the scientific literature is abundantly clear, over and over again, that the Inuit consumed too much protein, and more importantly, Per debunks Stefansson’s claims for high fat with writing from his own books—Stef admitted in the pemmican recipes that Arctic caribou was too lean to make pemmican that supported ketosis. The most popular LCHF bloggers in Sweden, Andreas Eenfeldt/Diet Doctor and Annika Dahlquist have reluctantly agreed with Per’s findings—admitting that the Inuit were likely not ketogenic from their diet. I’ve put together a comprehensive review of the scientific literature regarding the Inuit, encompassing over two dozen studies, spanning 150 years, with references from explorers, including Stefansson. In the comments section of that post, Per gives a brief overview of how he was able to prove Stefansson’s observations on high fat intake were flawed. The post is a review of all the available literature that I could find (over two dozen studies). But, the literature certainly does not in any way support ketosis from the Inuit diet due to such high protein consumption. As Per (and Stefansson) points out, the caribou is too lean and as the many quotes show, the Inuit were saving their blubber and fat for the long dark Winter to power their oil lamps and heat their igloos. Again and again, we see that in the literature, as even Stefansson admits this. As far as glycogen is concerned, their glycogen intake is probably not worth scrutinizing given the well-documented high protein consumption in every published study. It really is besides the point. But, interest Continue reading >>

Can You Die From Diabetes Type 2 And How To Prevent It?

Can You Die From Diabetes Type 2 And How To Prevent It?

Can you Die from Diabetes Type 2 and How to Prevent It? Diabetes is a serious disease that is usually life-long. According to the World Health Organization, diabetes mellitus type 2 is a form of a metabolic disease that is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes is around 20 times more common than type 1 diabetes, and around 90% of all diabetic people can be assigned to the type 2 category. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that is a serious complication. Can diabetes kill you? If you have this complication, it is potentially life-threatening. Diabetic ketoacidosis develops when the boy produces high levels of ketones (blood acids). When you cannot produce adequate insulin, the body breaks down fat to use as fuel. That breakdown eventually leads to a buildup of ketones, which leads to ketoacidosis. Causes and Symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Insulin is a necessary hormone that comes from a pancreatic gland. This hormone lowers the sugar level in the bloodstream. Glucose comes from food and your liver. When levels of glucose are high, there is a risk for diabetic ketoacidosis. Experts believe that genetics, lifestyle, and environment contribute to the development of diabetes type 2. The symptoms and signs of dying from diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis are the first indications of having this disease for many people. They include: Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Shortness of breath Excessive thirst Weakness/fatigue Confusion Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Positive antibody tests in older people suggest that type 2 diabetes is not a uniform condition and that in around 10% of cases, an autoimmune disease may be the cause of diabetes. While you can’t change your genes, you can do some things to prevent type Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a frightening term for any diabetic. This condition can rapidly kill a diabetic if treatment is not administered immediately. Ketoacidosis can occur in any person for a number of reasons such as alcoholism or starvation, but diabetic ketoacidosis is only found in diabetics, primarily uncontrolled type 1 diabetics. Often times a diabetic is first diagnosed with diabetes when rushed to the ER in severe ketoacidosis. In general ketoacidosis is when the body produces too much ketones, it breaks down fatty acids and these build up in the blood and quite literally the blood becomes toxic and poisonous making the body deathly ill. The build up of acetone in the blood is marked by a sweet almost fruity smell on the breath and sometimes in the sweat. Exactly what causes ketoacidosis in diabetics? When a diabetic is uncontrolled and their blood sugar runs too high over an extended length of time the body recognizes that it is being starved for insulin, so it begins to breakdown fat for energy. This breakdown of fat causes acid to build up in the blood and this leads to ketoacidosis. Oftentimes diabetic ketoacidosis is triggered by illness and/or dehydration. If you are diabetic and have, say, a cold or the flu and your blood sugar has been running higher for a while, you are at high risk of developing ketoacidosis. Always drink plenty of water to avoid becoming dehydrated and ending up sick. Hydration is good for everyone, especially diabetics. What are the symptoms of ketoacidosis? Frequent urination, unquenchable thirst/dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches/cramps, dehydration, fruity smell on the breath, high blood sugar, shortness of breath (an uncontrollable fast, shallow breathing). Before the early 1900’s diabetic ketoacidosis was the e Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

When Does Diabetes Kill The fear experience of diabetic ketoacidosis the truth behind my encounter with what is dka? Diabetes daily. In respiratory distress and it is what can kill, according to holly brewer, ms rd cde how the diabetic ketoacidosis you check. Diabetes mellitus How long does diabetes take to kill you if it is not treated? . Doc james (talk email contributions) 02 44, 16 July 2009 (utc). Most body cells mainly burn sugar (glucose) for energy. November 19, 2009 dka occurs when there is insufficient insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. In emergency care with the dangers of severe hypoglycemia why is diabetes so dangerous can you manage your diet with ketogenic? . This can happen if you have type 2 diabetes, ketoacidosis is rare, but you may experience very high failure to reach the site of infection fast enough to gobble and kill bacteria. Illness and diabetes research and wellness foundation. The problem comes when you have diabetes and insufficient insulin to move glucose from your bloodstream into the body's cells. August 30, 2016 is a serious condition that will cause you to violently ill can kill. Diabetic ketoacidosis diabetes self management. Myths of diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) r. How diabetic ketoacidosis kills you for a moment bothered me when I read about a strange guy who has her husband (55) newly diagnosed with adult onset diabetes are happy to be sneaky and see their partner slowly himself; I rebelled against from the age of 12 until I met mr at the age of 17, November 2, 2015 myth # 1 we should get abgs instead vbgs in dkaso do literature review meet two studies that specifically 13 of 2010 patients type 1 hypoglycemia frequent episodes can not only ruin, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

​This article is written for type 2 diabetics who need help coming down from a very high blood sugar during a single, isolated high blood sugar event. If you want to try an stabilize your baseline, consider signing up for my Baseline Blood Sugar Challenge course. ​THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL MEDICAL ADVICE. If you're a type 2 diabetic and your blood sugar is high right now (greater than 300mg/dL for at least 6 hours), the first thing you should do is call your doctor. So, if you haven't called anyone for help yet, please stop reading this article and call your doctor. If your doctor is able to help, then you need not read on. Also, if you are having symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, stop reading this article and go to the hospital immediately. Diabetic Ketoacidosis can kill you if left untreated. But. If you're in a situation where your blood sugar has been high for an extended period of time, you could perhaps consider taking the following steps to solve your blood sugar problem. Disclaimer: This is friendly, non-medical advice from a random diabetic person you don't even know, which is a very (very) poor substitute for real, actual medical advice. Use at your own risk. First, you should try and lower your blood sugar without injectable insulin by completing the following steps: 1. Check your blood sugar. Write down the time and your blood sugar level. 2. Drink water (this doesn't actually lower blood sugar, but it helps flush sugar and ketones from your body, if you have them). Continue drinking water, but please don't make yourself sick. 3. Move. As in, walk. Walk around the block or walk in place or haul your ass up and down the stairs for 30-60 minutes. Walking helps your cells become less insulin resistant, which is what you need right now. Do N Continue reading >>

Talk:diabetic Ketoacidosis

Talk:diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it. August 4, 2009 Good article nominee Listed Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Diabetic ketoacidosis. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine [hide](Rated GA-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. GA This article has been rated as GA-Class on the project's quality scale. Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale. Comment[edit] The section "Ketone body production" is very poor; it needs rewritten. Ketones needn't be desribed as "fuel for the brain" - they are used in the production of acetyl-CoA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dermotmallon (talk • contribs) 10:54, 10 June 2008 (UTC) more re ketone bodies[edit] The mechanism section does not clearly explain the pathophysiology of DKA. I am not an expert, but I believe the release of acidifying ketone bod Continue reading >>

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

Hannah Postles discovered she had type 1 diabetes after going to A&E with blurred vision. It wasn’t her only symptom. For the previous three weeks, she’d been thirsty, drinking two bottles of water at lunch, had lost weight and felt run down. Scroll down for video ‘My boss suggested I might have diabetes after looking up my symptoms online, but my GP seemed to dismiss it because of my age,’ says Hannah, a press officer for the University of Sheffield. ‘I was 26 and most type 1 diabetics are diagnosed in childhood.’ Luckily, Hannah spoke to a doctor friend who told her to go to A&E, where she was tested for diabetes, and immediately put on an insulin drip. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t make insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Typically, people with type 1 diabetes are diagnosed around the age of 12 — although occasionally adults are diagnosed in later life. Type 2 diabetes, which can be diagnosed at any age, occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin itself does not work properly. Not only did Hannah have diabetes, her blood sugar levels were so out of control by the time she was diagnosed that she had developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition when blood glucose levels remain persistently high for days or weeks. The condition can be caused by illness or infection or by the mismanagement of diabetes — which, as Hannah, now 29, discovered, can be the result of not knowing you have it. Symptoms include vomiting, headaches, abdominal pain and, if left too long, coma and even death. Had Hannah not gone to A&E, she might have died. In July 2012, new mother Nicky Rigby, 26, from the Wirral, did die from undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. She’d assumed her chronic tiredness a Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You

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How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You

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High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

Diabetes has become such a chronic long-term condition that it’s easy to forget about the serious acute complications that can arise, which can lead to a coma or death if not treated. There are only two types of emergencies – having very high glucose and having a very low glucose. The warning signs of an looming coma range from a mild headache to hallucinations.. If not identified or treated both types of emergencies can lead to serious irreversible complications including brain damage, kidney failure and death. When your glucose is very very high The fundamental issue in diabetes is raised blood glucose levels. Medically this is called hyperglycaemia. When glucose rises very rapidly or to very high levels, it can result in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma or a hyperglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidotic coma This happens in type 1 diabetes and the high risk people include children and teens. A person can go into a ketoacidotic coma within a few hours. A person in a ketoacidotic crisis presents with: a complete lack of insulin in the body very high glucose levels dehydration break down of muscle abnormal potassium, sodium and other electrolyte levels. Causes of ketoacidotic crisis or coma A person who hasn’t been diagnosed with diabetes as yet Missing an insulin dose Illness such as gastroenteritis, nausea and vomiting Not adjusting insulin when glucose is high What to look out for if you suspect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Shortness of breath Fruity smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Severe fatigue Abdominal pain and headache Thirst Passing urine more often. Danger signs to watch out for Slurred speech Blurred vision Reduced concentration Coma. What you must do if yoususpect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Get to a casualty Continue reading >>

My Encounter With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

My Encounter With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Truth Behind My Encounter With Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A day like any other, can turn into a day you’ll never forget) With diabetes comes the good and the bad. When it’s good, it can be REALLY good. But when it’s bad…it can be life-threatening. I’ve certainly had my share of bad days. Trying to battle the high and the lows, and trying to stay as close to normal without losing my sanity. With having diabetes I’ve experienced many symptoms. But one day came symptoms like no other… chills – nausea – vomiting – back pain – weakness – blurred vision … and lots of ketones I had DKA (Diabetic Ketoacidosis) This was years ago, after a night of drinking with friends. Wanting to live a free, independent young adult life. Knowing, yet not knowing how destructive being the slightest bit careless could affect my diabetes. I just felt terrible. To the point where I questioned where to take insulin or not. I thought to myself … Well I don’t really plan on eating today, and I don’t want to worry about dropping “low”. I thought I was saving myself from having to fix my blood sugar. So I missed my morning dose… (Boy, was that a mistake – NEVER – would I do this again) I didn’t know at the time that insulin is needed (with or without food) Even on sick days! Without insulin in my body, my body couldn’t receive the energy to function properly. I kept close eyes on my blood sugar for a few hours that day, which was only in the mid 200’s. I thought that due to the fact I wasn’t eating, my blood sugar would come down eventually anyways. But the symptoms progressed. I couldn’t keep anything down … not even water. To be honest, DKA never came to mind. I’ve always taken my insulin. The only other time was when I was diagnosed, and was mo Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

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