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Can Ketoacidosis Kill You

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Talk:diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it. August 4, 2009 Good article nominee Listed Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Diabetic ketoacidosis. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine [hide](Rated GA-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. GA This article h Continue reading >>

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  1. road hog

    my dog of 7 has been unwell and has spent most of the weekend at the vets (£400 )a night stay.(not that i begrudge paying)
    what i am wondering is if any other dog folk have a diabetic dog and what to expect or any advice ,seems he is improving abit (flattened the pup of 1 year after his breckie)
    going to have to give him 2 insulin jabs a day . ?
    is this only available thru the vets ..?
    here he is with his older (bigger brother)
    [url]|http://thumbsnap.com/v/xrEUV3Xp.jpg[/u

  2. sonic_2k_uk

    He has type 1 diabetes which is insulin dependent. I'm pretty sure its treated the same in dogs as humans, so yes insulin injections will be required.
    Ketoacidosis happens with diabetes when there is not sufficient insulin to reduce the rate at which the liver breaks down fat.
    When the live burns fat it produces ketones. As the liver runs away burning fat without the insulin to control it, the body effectively poisons itself as your blood turns acidic.
    Having had ketoacidosis, i can say its seriously not nice! I'm pretty sure you'd die of dehydration before the ketones killed you though.
    Ketoacidosis is completely treatable is caught in time though, you need to control the level of insulin correctly, reducing the blood sugar level and controlling the liver, replace the lost fluids flushing the ketones out of the blood, basically

  3. road hog

    he seems to be drinking and urinating alot , will this be flushing the "ketones" out of his system,
    sleeping alot and getting spoilt (laid out on settee).
    just been doing some internet surfing and hadnt realized how serious it was .could have lost him on friday night.
    Edited by road hog on Sunday 7th March 13:47
    picture taken on thursday night....really ill but still wanted to kill the zebra.
    Edited by road hog on Sunday 7th March 13:49

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency rela Continue reading >>

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  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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Confusing Ketosis With Ketoacidosis

Confusing Ketosis with Ketoacidosis Confusing Ketosis with Ketoacidosis – Nutrition professionals often say low-carb diets, and a very low-glycemic diet like that of the Roman Diet, cause ketoacidosis, a medical emergency that can kill you. This is completely false. They are confusing the words “ketosis” and “ketoacidosis” – which are vastly different. Ketosis does happen on low-carb diets and when following the Roman Diet, ahich is very low-glycemic and low in insulin demand. When the body is not getting the usual amount of carbohydrates typical in the western lifestyle, it releases fats from the fat tissues, which go to the liver and are turned into ketone bodies. Ketones are molecules that can cross the blood-brain barrier and provide energy for the brain when it isn’t receiving enough glucose. This is the body’s natural response to low-carb or very low-glycemic intake. This is NOT to be confused with ketoacidosis, which is something that only happens in uncontrolled diabetes, mainly uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It involves the bloodstream being flooded with both glucose and ketone bodies in extremely large amounts. Ketoacidosis is dangerous, that is true. But t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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