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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Seizures

Epilepsy

Epilepsy

Tweet Epilepsy is a neurological condition which only has one visible symptom - repeated seizures, the severity of which can vary from person to person. While epilepsy is most commonly diagnosed during childhood, it can develop at any age, even in people who are over 65 years old. It is possible for people to have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes alongside epilepsy, but the relationship between diabetes and epilepsy is unclear - there is currently a lack of research investigating a link between the two conditions. How do seizures happen? Seizures happen when there is too much electrical activity in groups of neurons in the brain. There are two main types of seizures: generalised and focal. Generalised seizures occur when large areas on both sides of the brain are affected by disruptions to its normal activity. Consciousness can often be lost during generalised seizures. In focal seizures a specific region of the brain is affected, and while consciousness may be altered, it is not always lost. Focal seizures can often present as if a person is daydreaming. Most times people recover quickly from seizures, which normally end within a few minutes. But frequent seizures can severely limit a person’s quality of life – for example, people can be prevented from driving and some might require regular supervision. Diabetes and seizures Seizures that happen as a direct result of diabetes, notably if very low sugar levels occur, are known as non-epileptic seizures. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Seizures – What Are They? Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Diabetic Seizures – What Are They? Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

A diabetic seizure is a serious medical condition and without emergency treatment, it has proven to be fatal. Extremely low levels of sugar in the diabetic’s blood cause these seizures. That is why it is so important for those who have diabetes to monitor and control their blood sugar. What Are the Causes? A number of different things can actually cause a diabetic seizure to occur. It could happen because too much insulin is injected, or because the diabetic did not eat right after taking insulin. Some of the other potential causes include not eating meals regularly or drinking too much alcohol. Even certain oral diabetes medications can make the body produce excess insulin. Those who are exercising too much without taking into account how this will affect their insulin levels will also be at a greater risk of suffering a diabetic stroke. No matter what causes the seizure, it is always a medical emergency and those who have one need immediate medical attention. What Are the Symptoms? When entering the first stages of a diabetic seizure, the person may exhibit a number of different symptoms. Some of the most common symptoms include: Sweating Clamminess Drowsiness Confusion Bodily shakes Hallucinations Rapid and unexpected emotional changes Weakness in the muscles Anxiety Vision changes Loss of ability to speak clearly After these initial symptoms, the next phase of symptoms begin and the danger level rises. Now, the person may stare into space and be non-communicative and uncontrollable body movements and contractions of the muscles may occur. In some cases, the diabetic will be unaware of the movements and may even fall into unconsciousness. What Is the Prevention and Treatment? The best way to deal with this problem is by ensuring it does not occur in the first place Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Accompanied By Epileptic Seizures In A Patient With Diabetes Mellitus And Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis And Stroke-like Episodes (melas).

Ketoacidosis Accompanied By Epileptic Seizures In A Patient With Diabetes Mellitus And Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis And Stroke-like Episodes (melas).

Abstract We herein report a rare case of MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) and diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis. An 18-year-old female patient was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy was thereafter initiated. At 26 years of age, she was hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis, soon followed by a loss of consciousness, left-sided dysmetria, and ataxic speech. MELAS was diagnosed because of the presence of ragged red fibers in a muscle biopsy. At 33 years of age, she was admitted to our hospital because of ketoacidosis and partial status epilepticus. A blood gas examination revealed as follows; arterial pH, 6.88; bicarbonate, 2.1 mmol/l; base excess - 29.8 mmol/l. The serum level of glucose had also increased to 30 mmol/l. The serum levels of lactate and B-hydroxybutyrate were elevated to 11.4 mmol/l and 1,990 micromol/l, respectively. Ketoacidosis improved by fluid replacement and continuous intravenous insulin infusion. A brain MRI demonstrated hyperintensity areas on FLAIR images in the bilateral temporal lobes and the cerebellum. A proton MRS demonstrated the abnormal lactate accumulation in the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes. Since epileptic seizures are rare in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, such seizures may indicate the existence of MELAS syndrome. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Complications caused by diabetes People with diabetes must routinely monitor and regulate their blood sugar. No matter how careful you may be, there’s still a possibility that a problem might arise. There are two types of complications you may experience: acute and chronic. Acute complications require emergency care. Examples include hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. If left untreated, these conditions can cause: seizures loss of consciousness death Chronic complications occur when diabetes isn’t managed properly. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels. If not controlled well over time, high blood sugar levels can damage various organs, including the: eyes kidneys heart skin Unmanaged diabetes can also cause nerve damage. People with diabetes can experience sudden drops in their blood sugar. Skipping a meal or taking too much insulin or other medications that increase insulin levels in the body are common causes. People who are on other diabetes medications that do not increase insulin levels are not at risk for hypoglycemia. Symptoms can include: blurry vision rapid heartbeat headache shaking dizziness If your blood sugar gets too low, you can experience fainting, seizures, or coma. This is a complication of diabetes that occurs when your body cannot use sugar, or glucose, as a fuel source because your body has no insulin or not enough insulin. If your cells are starved for energy, your body begins to break down fat. Potentially toxic acids called ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fat breakdown, build up in the body. This can lead to: dehydration abdominal pain breathing problems Diabetes can damage blood vessels in the eyes and cause various problems. Possible eye conditions may include: Cataracts Cataracts are two to five times more likely to develop in people Continue reading >>

Which Foods Increase Blood Acidity?

Which Foods Increase Blood Acidity?

Before Having Your Tonsils Removed Tonsillectomies are performed under general anesthesia. You will be completely asleep and will not be able to feel pain during the procedure. You will not be able to eat before surgery. This is because there is a risk of vomiting with anesthesia. Your physician or nurse will give you exact instructions about when to stop eating and drinking. In addition to not eating or drinking, you should not smoke, chew gum, or suck on mints or candy. Tonsillectomies are mostly performed in same day surgery settings. This means that you will go home the same day that you have your tonsils removed. You should wear loose comfortable clothing to the surgical center. Arrive on time. In some cases a medication called Versed can be given prior to the procedure to reduce anxiety, especially in small children. If you have other health problems, your doctor may order blood work or other tests before the surgery. If you are a woman of childbearing age (usually age 12 to 55 unless you have had a hysterectomy), it is mandatory that you have a pregnancy test before the surgery. This requires a small amount of urine. If the patient is a child and has a comfort item, such as a blanket or a favorite toy, bring it with you. Also, if your child drinks from a bottle or special cup, bring it along so your child can drink after the surgery. Make sure you bring comfortable clothing and extra diapers or underwear. Prior to having your tonsils removed, you will need to remove any metal from your body, including jewelry, retainers or body piercings. You will also need to remove contact lenses, dentures, and hearing aids. You will also need to refrain from medications that have the ability to thin your blood for one to two weeks before surgery. These medications include aspi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Encephalopathy

Diabetic Encephalopathy

Diabetic encephalopathy is damage to the brain caused by diabetes. A relatively unknown complication, encephalopathy is becoming more widely recognized as more people are diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetic encephalopathy presents itself both mentally and physically. It can induce an altered mental state, cognitive decline, changes in personality, memory lapses, or severe impairment like dementia. The complication can also cause tremors, lack of coordination, and even seizures. Diabetic encephalopathy is largely due to acute hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels are too low) or severe hyperglycemia (blood sugar levels are too high). The condition manifests itself differently between the two major types of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Encephalopathy in those with type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. According to a 2011 study, those with type 2 diabetes were twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s and 1.75 times more likely to develop other forms of dementia than healthy participants. This increased risk could be due to many different factors brought about from type 2 diabetes. It could be caused by the body’s resistance to insulin, which makes it difficult for the brain to break down amyloid, a protein that forms brain plaques. Brain plaques are abnormal clusters of this protein that block cell-to-cell signaling at the synapses—a symptom infamous for contributing to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Type 2 diabetic encephalopathy can also be generated from hyperglycemia or the conditions that commonly accompany type 2 diabetes like high blood pressure, obesity, or high cholesterol. Oxidative stress is another provoker of the complication. This stems from an imbalance between reactive oxyge Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

What Are The Short-term Consequences Of Not Controlling Type 1 Diabetes?

What Are The Short-term Consequences Of Not Controlling Type 1 Diabetes?

Death. Well, that depends on just how poorly controlled you're talking, but if you mean not treating at all, then you can progress through some serious consequences ending in death over the course of a day or so. Unlike the more common Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, people with Diabetes mellitus type 1 do not produce insulin on their own, and need an external source of insulin to survive. That is because cells cannot take in sugar from the bloodstream to fuel themselves without insulin, so once the sugar in there is used up the cells have to start breaking down fatty acids to stay alive, but that produces ketones, which are toxic. At the same time, all the sugar that's stuck, unusable, in the bloodstream interferes with kidney function, causing dehydration. Its a combination that leads to Diabetic ketoacidosis, which can kill a person within 24 hours of their first symptoms. Ok, so now lets consider a person who is still taking some insulin, but not really paying attention to their blood sugar. It is still possible for them to undertreat themselves, which can potentially still lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. Or, they can overtreat themselves, causing hypoglycaemia, which if only slight might just make them a little woozy, but if severe can lead to unconsciousness and death if they are not found and treated. Easing up a little more, we can imagine a person who's a bit more careful. They still take their insulin, they check their blood sugars relatively often, but they can be a little forgetful about just how many helpings of dessert they had. Their sugars will run high, but there should be enough getting into the cells to prevent DKA. Most of the consequences of that are going to be long-term, like peripheral vascular disease, kidney damage and retinopathy. In the short term, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Seizures In Dogs

Diabetic Seizures In Dogs

Seeing your dog have a seizure can be pretty scary, especially the first time this happens. If the seizure is caused by diabetes complications, the good news is that future seizures can be prevented by controlling the dog's diabetes. Why Seizures Happen Any seizure—in a dog or a human—is caused by a kind of electrical storm in the brain. If a dog has diabetes, her body doesn't produce the right amount of insulin for control of blood sugar levels. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, and diabetes can be caused by too much or too little. Very low blood sugar levels can interrupt the normal functioning of the brain, leading to a diabetic seizure. Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Problems relating to diabetes in dogs usually stem from a state of either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. A hypoglycemic dog has very low blood sugar and may experience a seizure as a result. In diabetic dogs, hypoglycemia commonly occurs when an insulin dose is given without sufficient food for the dog's body to utilize the insulin properly. The opposite diabetic state, hyperglycemia, occurs when the dog's blood sugar levels are extremely high. Although hyperglycemia does not typically cause seizures, this is a serious state in which the dog may become depressed, weak and anorexic. Hyperglycemia can cause a dog to become comatose. Seizure Prevention If your dog is diabetic, seizure prevention primarily involves preventing a state of hypoglycemia. Use insulin that is formulated specifically for dogs—Novolin, Vetsulin and Caninsulin are some of the most commonly used forms of canine insulin. Monitor your dog's blood glucose regularly to make sure the insulin dosage is correct and having the desired effect. Monitor your dog's feeding and exercise patterns, if possible with a regular daily schedule Continue reading >>

Can People Die From Bulimia?

Can People Die From Bulimia?

Yes! It can go unnoticed for a long period of time because you don’t see the binging or purging part ,at least most of the time. The article from Death From Bulimia - 9 Terrifying Conditions To Look Out For sums it up perfectly, so I’m just going to copy and paste it here. 1. Ketoacidosis: This is when high acid levels build up in your blood. An extremely dangerous condition that can lead to sudden coma and death. 2. Seizures or Fits: People with bulimia have a higher chance of suffering from seizures or fits which can cause brain damage and death. 3. Pancreatitis: This potentially life threatening illness is when digestive enzymes attack your pancreas. It can be caused by the excessive use of laxatives or diet pills. 4. Electrolyte Imbalance: Dehydration, the loss of potassium and the loss of sodium can cause electrolyte imbalances. Abnormal electrolyte levels are common in bulimics and can cause sudden cardiac arrest - which is what happened to Terri Schiavo. 5. Suicide and Depression: Being bulimic can feel like a living hell. Every day is hard. It's an exhausting and depressing way to live. Suicide is a real risk for those deeply lost in bulimia. 6. Cardiac Arrest: Cardiac arrest is when the heart simply stops beating. It is one of the most common causes of death from bulimia. 7. Gastric Rupture: A gastric rupture can occur when you eat huge amounts during a binge and it bursts your stomach. Although it is not very common, a gastric rupture is often fatal. 8. Hypo and Hyperglycemia: These can be caused when your blood sugar levels are too high or too low. This is usually the result of binging and purging/fasting. Hypo and hyperglycemia can cause many different life threatening complications. 9. Barrett's Esophagus: Bulimia can cause Gastroesophageal Reflux Disea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition caused by dangerously high blood sugar levels. Your blood sugar levels become high because your body does not have enough insulin. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. The lack of insulin forces your body to use fat instead of sugar for energy. As fats are broken down, they leave chemicals called ketones that build up in your blood. Ketones are dangerous at high levels. What increases my risk for DKA? Not enough insulin Poorly controlled diabetes Infection or other illness Heart attack, stroke, trauma, or surgery Certain medicines such as steroids or blood pressure medicines Illegal drugs such as cocaine Emotional stress Pregnancy What are the signs and symptoms of DKA? More thirst and more frequent urination than usual Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting Blurry vision Dry mouth, eyes, and skin, or your face is red and warm Fast, deep breathing, and a faster heartbeat than normal for you Weak, tired, and confused Fruity, sweet breath Mood changes and irritability How is DKA treated? DKA can be life-threatening. You must get immediate medical attention. The goal of treatment is to replace lost body fluids, and to bring your blood sugar level back to normal. How can I help prevent DKA? The best way to prevent DKA is to control your diabetes. Ask your healthcare provider for more information on how to manage your diabetes. The following may help decrease your risk for DKA: Monitor your blood sugar levels closely if you have an infection, are stressed, sick, or experience trauma. Check your blood sugar levels often. You may need to check at least 3 times each day. If your blood sugar level is too high, give yourself insulin as Continue reading >>

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Hypocapnic Seizure

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Hypocapnic Seizure

Summary In clinical practice, seizures independent of hypoglycemia are observed in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) more frequently than expected by chance, suggesting a link. However, seizures during management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have generally been considered a bad prognostic factor, and usually associated with well-known biochemical or neurological complications. We present the case of a 17-year-old girl with known T1DM managed for severe DKA complicated by hypocapnic seizure. We review the literature on this rare occurrence as well as outline other possible differentials to consider when faced with the alarming combination of DKA and seizure. Learning points: Seizures during DKA treatment require immediate management as well as evaluation to determine their underlying cause. Their etiology is varied, but a lowered seizure threshold, electrolyte disturbances and serious neurological complications of DKA such as cerebral edema must all be considered. Sudden severe hypocapnia may represent a rare contributor to seizure during the treatment of DKA. Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an endocrine emergency occurring in patients with both new-onset and established type 1 diabetes (T1DM). In brief, the diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion followed by fulfillment of biochemical criteria: Hyperglycemia (blood glucose level (BGL) >11 mmol/L); ketonuria and/or ketonemia and metabolic acidosis (pH <7.3, bicarbonate <15 mmol/L). It is a leading acute cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality, particularly in children (1), often due to well-described complications of treatment. The most common of these include cerebral edema, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypoglycemia and hypokalemia. Seizure activity occurring during treatment o Continue reading >>

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