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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Seizures

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition caused by dangerously high blood sugar levels. Your blood sugar levels become high because your body does not have enough insulin. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. The lack of insulin forces your body to use fat instead of sugar for energy. As fats are broken down, they leave chemicals called ketones that build up in your blood. Ketones are dangerous at high levels. What increases my risk for DKA? Not enough insulin Poorly controlled diabetes Infection or other illness Heart attack, stroke, trauma, or surgery Certain medicines such as steroids or blood pressure medicines Illegal drugs such as cocaine Emotional stress Pregnancy What are the signs and symptoms of DKA? More thirst and more frequent urination than usual Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting Blurry vision Dry mouth, eyes, and skin, or your face is red and warm Fast, deep breathing, and a faster heartbeat than normal for you Weak, tired, and confused Fruity, sweet breath Mood changes and irritability How is DKA treated? DKA can be life-threatening. You must get immediate Continue reading >>

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  1. Michael L. Jirka

    Ketones are produced when the body has to use fats for energy. ketones and Beta Hydroxy Butyric acid are byproducts. You, as a type 1 diabetic take insulin more than once a day because your pancreas is weak from a virus or you have an autoimmune antibody destroying your natural insulin. Either way, you are not an UNDIAGNOSED diabetic who has never had an insulin shot, and even though your sugar was very high, you took insulin and the body will always utilize glucose before it uses fats and proteins for energy. AND THAT IS WHY I THINK IT IS POSSIBLE IN YOUR CASE.

  2. Aerie Robinson

    I am high frequently - getting much better though, go me - I would also dump ketones, when I felt like checking them, but would also often not dump them as often as i would think for being as high as I was. I'd be 400+ and have none or very low ketones.

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What is hypophosphatemia? Hypophosphatemia is a condition characterized by low phosphate levels in the blood. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what youre learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Sumant Nanduri Omar Berrios Alex Wright Sabrina Wong Suzanne Peek Arfan Azam Mingli Fng Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the worlds caregivers with the best learning experience possible.

Hypophosphatemia In Emergency Medicine

Phosphate is the most abundant intracellular anion and is essential for membrane structure, energy storage, and transport in all cells. In particular, phosphate is necessary to produce ATP, which provides energy for nearly all cell functions. Phosphate is an essential component of DNA and RNA. Phosphate is also necessary in red blood cells for production of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), which facilitates release of oxygen from hemoglobin. Approximately 85% of the body's phosphorus is in bone as hydroxyapatite, while most of the remainder (15%) is present in soft tissue. Only 0.1% of phosphorus is present in extracellular fluid, and it is this fraction that is measured with a serum phosphorus level. Reducing available phosphate may compromise any organ system, alone or in combination. The critical role phosphate plays in every cell, tissue, and organ explains the systemic nature of injury caused by phosphate deficiency. Serum phosphate or phosphorus normally ranges from 2.5-4.5 mg/dL (0.81-1.45 mmol/L) in adults. Hypophosphatemia is defined as mild (2-2.5 mg/dL, or 0.65-0.81 mmol/L), moderate (1-2 mg/dL, or 0.32-0.65 mmol/L), or severe (< 1 mg/dL, or 0.32 mmol/L). Mild to modera Continue reading >>

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  1. Michael L. Jirka

    Ketones are produced when the body has to use fats for energy. ketones and Beta Hydroxy Butyric acid are byproducts. You, as a type 1 diabetic take insulin more than once a day because your pancreas is weak from a virus or you have an autoimmune antibody destroying your natural insulin. Either way, you are not an UNDIAGNOSED diabetic who has never had an insulin shot, and even though your sugar was very high, you took insulin and the body will always utilize glucose before it uses fats and proteins for energy. AND THAT IS WHY I THINK IT IS POSSIBLE IN YOUR CASE.

  2. Aerie Robinson

    I am high frequently - getting much better though, go me - I would also dump ketones, when I felt like checking them, but would also often not dump them as often as i would think for being as high as I was. I'd be 400+ and have none or very low ketones.

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Diabetes can KILL YOU! Dangers of Diabetes with Ketoacidosis So don't do drugs. That is the message for this video. And I think these days you are more likely to die of problems with drug related issues than even road traffic accidents. So this is a major, major issue. We recently had a young lady. She came to the hospital with fevers, chills shaking all over. She was found to have swelling, warmth and severe pain of her arm where she normally injects her heroin. Now, that is a bad recreational drug to start off with but what happens in people who inject themselves is that they develop infections in that area. What could happen is that the infection can spread in the blood stream and lead to infecting your heart. But that can be especially dangerous. So she came to the hospital. She had spiking fevers. She had chills. She had not gone into withdrawals from her heroin yet but she apparently left against medical advice and did not want to be treated. And apparently of course, she wanted to inject herself with more heroin. Two days later, she comes back to the hospital with raging fevers and worsening pain of her arm. Of course she was admitted again. She was started on antibiotics. Found out that she had a really bad bacteria and a bug that could be very, very dangerous. Fortunately, she did not develop any infection of the heart. So the course of her antibiotics were not that long. Having said that, still she put herself in a very dangerous position. She agreed thankfully, to undergo rehab. And because she agreed to do rehab which a lot of people don't and they just want to go out and keep on doing these types of drugs. And the good thing about that was we could put in a line where she will be monitored through which she could receive longer antibiotics. I guess it is very risky in these patients who are drug abusers because they may use that line to inject drugs into them. And that could put the medical practitioner in jeopardy also. But for her, she was gonna be monitored. We put in a line for her through which we were giving her medications by IV which she definitely needed. And of course she would be monitored closely in a closed unit where she will be detoxed from her heroin addiction. Now this was a happy ending. Hopefully she maintains this. Hopefully she does not go back into abusing drugs. A lot of times what happens it's not the person, it's the environment that the person is living in. If they don't have any family support. If all their friends are into drugs and they're not involved in other activities they don't go to school or they don't have a job. All they can do is waste their time on drugs. Which is very, very unfortunate. And as I said, this problem is as bad as getting into a car accident. This is surely avoidable by not getting into these medicines in the first place. So the rule again is do not do drugs. If you do, you have to be ready for the consequences. So let's finish this video off and again, it's your doctors goal to prevent you from taking medication. But if you have to, you must take them properly. My friends, stay healthy. And stay safe.

The Dangers In Bulimia Are Real - This Illness Can Kill!

People often overlook the dangers in bulimia. They think that because bulimics are often within a healthy weight range, that it's a 'safe' eating disorder. The truth could not be more different... I was bulimic for over 10 years. The illness ravaged my body and I knew that it was close to killing me. But thankfully, I got help and I recovered... Too many people don't seek help for their bulimia and suffer from it for years on end, sometimes for many decades. Too often, bulimia kills. To help you realize the dangers in bulimia, I've listed the 10 most worrying ones below. TOP 10 Terrifying Dangers in Bulimia Please click on the links below to jump to that part of the 'dangers in bulimia' page, or just scroll down. Suicide Ketoacidosis Malnutrition and then see... Seizures or Fits If you suffer from bulimia you have an increased risk of having seizures or fits. The seizures may be caused by dehydration, hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis. Seizures are one of the serious dangers in bulimia because they can cause brain damage. Electrolyte Imbalance Electrolytes are important chemicals in your body. Having the right balance of electrolytes is essential for your nerves, muscles and organs to Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Michael L. Jirka

    Ketones are produced when the body has to use fats for energy. ketones and Beta Hydroxy Butyric acid are byproducts. You, as a type 1 diabetic take insulin more than once a day because your pancreas is weak from a virus or you have an autoimmune antibody destroying your natural insulin. Either way, you are not an UNDIAGNOSED diabetic who has never had an insulin shot, and even though your sugar was very high, you took insulin and the body will always utilize glucose before it uses fats and proteins for energy. AND THAT IS WHY I THINK IT IS POSSIBLE IN YOUR CASE.

  2. Aerie Robinson

    I am high frequently - getting much better though, go me - I would also dump ketones, when I felt like checking them, but would also often not dump them as often as i would think for being as high as I was. I'd be 400+ and have none or very low ketones.

  3. -> Continue reading
read more

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