diabetestalk.net

Can Ketoacidosis Cause Kidney Failure

Medications And Kidney Complications, Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Medications And Kidney Complications, Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Your kidneys are two organs located on either side of your backbone just above your waist. They remove waste and excess fluid from the blood, maintain the balance of salt and minerals in the blood, and help regulate blood pressure, among other functions. 1 If damaged, they can cause you to have health issues. Acute Renal Injury A sudden loss of kidney function can be caused by: lack of blood flow to the kidneys, direct damage to the kidneys, or blockage of urine from the kidneys. Common causes of these losses of function may include: traumatic injury, dehydration, severe systemic infection (sepsis), damage from drugs/toxins or pregnancy complications. 2 Chronic Kidney Disease When kidney damage and decreased function lasts longer than three months, it is called chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD can be dangerous, as you may not have any symptoms until after the kidney damage, which may or may not be able to be repaired, has occurred. High blood pressure and diabetes (types 1 and 2) are the most common causes of CKD. 3 Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease There are also other causes of CKD. These can include: Immune system conditions (e.g., lupus) Long-term viral illnesses (HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B, hepatitis C) Pyelonephritis (urinary tract infections within the kidneys) Inflammation in the kidney’s filters (glomeruli) Polycystic kidney disease (fluid-filled cysts form in the kidneys) Congenital defects (malformations present at birth) Toxins, chemicals Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms People with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes have high levels of sugar (glucose) building up and circulating in the blood. This high blood sugar can cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and nerve damage, among other complications. 5 You may have no type 2 diabetes symptoms, or symptoms ma Continue reading >>

Outcome Of Acute Renal Failure In Children With Diabetic Keto Acidosis (dka)

Outcome Of Acute Renal Failure In Children With Diabetic Keto Acidosis (dka)

OUTCOME OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETIC KETO ACIDOSIS (DKA) Poovazhagi V, Prabha Senguttuvan, Padmaraj R Diabetic Clinic, Institute of Child Health and Hospital for Children, Chennai Address for Correspondence Dr V Poovazhagi, 8/11 Manjolai Street, Kalaimagal Nagar, Ekkaduthangal, Chennai. 600 032, India. Email [email protected] Abstract The presentation and outcome of acute renal failure in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were analyzed. Of the 130 DKA episodes treated at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), 15 children (11.5%) had renal failure. Sepsis and shock were the common etiological factors. Mortality in ARF complicating DKA was 40%. Persistent acidosis requiring bicarbonate therapy, reduction in intravenous fluid volume, reduced dose of insulin and peritoneal dialysis were the modifications in the treatment for this life-threatening complication. Keywords Acute Renal failure, DKA, infections, shock Introduction Cerebral edema is a life threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), other complications include dyselectrolytemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pulmonary edema and renal failure. Chronic renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy and its presentation with DKA is encountered in adults. But children with new onset diabetes mellitus (DM) or known diabetic children presenting with acute renal failure (ARF) is rare. Literature reveals few case reports of DKA with renal failure. (1,2,3) Reported mortality in ARF complicating DKA is about 50%. (1) We are presenting a series of children with DKA and renal failure. Methods & Materials This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of children with ARF in DKA from January 2006 to August 2010 in 130 children who presented with DKA. None w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and young adults carries significant morbidity and mortality relating to complications such as cerebral oedema. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of DKA. We present three cases of DKA complicated by AKI. Case 1: A 9-year-old girl presented with severe DKA at diagnosis. She was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin as per protocol. She had oliguria and haematuria 36 h after admission. She was hypertensive with evidence of enlarged kidneys on ultrasound (USS). She was transferred to the renal unit where she needed two cycles of hemodialysis before making full recovery. Case 2: A 14-year-old girl presented with severe DKA and altered consciousness at diagnosis. She developed oliguria 24 h after starting treatment for DKA. USS of abdomen showed enlarged kidneys. Her renal function improved with haemofiltration and recovered fully by 1 week. Case 3: A 17-year-old girl with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes presented with severe DKA. She showed evidence of AKI with very high plasma creatinine, oliguria and low plasma phosphate. She was managed conservatively with individualised fluid plan and phosphate supplementation with recovery in 7 days. Conclusion: Patients with severe DKA can develop AKI due to a number of possible causes, hypovolaemia being the most likely primary cause. Appropriate management of hypovolemia and electrolyte disturbance in these patients can be very challenging. These cases highlight the importance of early recognition of AKI (rising plasma creatinine, oliguria, and haematuria) and discussion with paediatric nephrologist to formulate individualised fluid therapy in order to prevent deterioration in renal function. It is uncertain if recent modification in flu Continue reading >>

My Dog Has Acute Kidney Failure And Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Should We Put Her To Sleep?

My Dog Has Acute Kidney Failure And Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Should We Put Her To Sleep?

First of all, you have my heart felt sympathies for what you are going through. I know how painful this time must be for you and your family. That decision to put your furry kid to sleep is yours and only yours to make. I am in a position to only share my experience with my own GSD's AKD. My Dash was affected by Acute Kidney disease at the age of 9 months. Within 3-4 hours of fluid therapy, our vet told us upfront that it's not working as the creatinine level had spiked from 5 at the time of reaching the vet to 9. We were proactive in asking her what can we do to save Dash. She told us that prompt dialysis is the only chance he has, no assurances / guarantee, just a chance; and directed us to the only private facility in the city where he could be given dialysis. Unfortunately, Dash couldn't be given dialysis there due to some last minute technical glitch. During this time, his creatinine had shot up to 11. Then, as the last resort, we took him to the government Veterinary hospital (which each and every one of our contact was against) as it has the only other canine dialysis unit in the city. As our luck would have it, the dialysis unit there too got stuck at the last minute. The vet there assured us she would stabilise Dash till the next morning and then have him go through dialysis. Sure enough, Dash did pull through the night and we were back the next morning for dialysis. The unit was fixed, however, Dash was found to be unfit for dialysis as his electrolyte levels had dropped substantially as well as his blood clotting was taking longer than normal. It took us almost 2 weeks to get him fit for dialysis. During this period, his creatinine had stayed above 10, fluctuating now and then; in addition, Dash had not eaten a single morsel of food in all this time. He was b Continue reading >>

Invokana Linked To Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Acute Kidney Failure

Invokana Linked To Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Acute Kidney Failure

According to a warning issued by the FDA in May 2015, the type 2 diabetes drug Invokana can cause high levels of acid to build up in the blood, a condition known as ketoacidosis. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) identified 20 cases of acidosis reported as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketoacidosis, or ketosis in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors from March 2013 to June 6, 2014. All 20 patients acquiring ketoacidosis that were reported to the FDA required emergency room visits or hospitalization to treat the condition. The FDA has since indicated that it has continued to receive similar reports of patients with type 2 diabetes who were taking drugs like Invokana and developed DKA, and urged physicians and patients to report future incidents to the FDA MedWatch program. Other serious incidents of acute kidney failure and complications have also been reported. Invokana and DKA DKA is a type of acidosis that most commonly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes and is usually accompanied by high blood sugar levels, not in those with type 2 diabetes with only slightly elevated levels, making the FAERS cases atypical, and experts are unsure as to what is causing DKA in some patients who take Invokana DKA is rare in diabetes patients, but is potentially fatal. Its most common cause is the omission of insulin, but other causes include: Infections Heart attacks Strokes Stomach bleeding Cushing’s syndrome Recent surgical procedures Medications including diuretics, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants that affect carbohydrate metabolism and can result in DKA Researchers have recently started to recognize that patients with type 2 diabetes can also contract DKA, and early symptoms include: Difficulty breathing Nausea and vomiting A Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

A new Journal of American Medical Association article has shown that there is a high rate of occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in children hospitalized with a diagnosis diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Acute kidney injury is one of the most common causes of renal injury that can arise from several aetiologies. Based on predisposing factors, the causes may be categorized into 3 classes: pre-renal, renal or post-renal. In cases of volume depletion, like that which occurs in diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication of diabetes where there is high ketone production), perfusion to kidneys is impaired and that is when the kidneys start to lose their functioning. Since acute kidney injury in children is associated with a poor short term and long term outcome, in a new JAMA article, and for the first time, researchers have evaluated the rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for the diabetic ketoacidosis. This study was conducted at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital from 2008 through 2013. 165 children aged 18 years or younger with type 1 diabetes, DKA and with complete medical records available for data analysis were included. The primary outcome was the development of acute kidney injury defined using Kidney Disease/Improving Global Outcomes serum creatinine criteria. As per findings, in the designed timeframe, of the 165 children hospitalized for DKA, 106 (64.2%) developed AKI.Two children required hemodialysis. Statistical analysis has shown that a serum bicarbonate level of less than 10 mEq/L was associated with a 5-fold increased risk of developing severe kidney injury. This means that the incidence of acute kidney injury is directly associated with the severity of the acidosis resulting from DKA. Increase in heart rate (demo Continue reading >>

What Causes Kidney Failure? How Can It Be Cured?

What Causes Kidney Failure? How Can It Be Cured?

Diabetes and high blood pressure are two major causes of kidney failure disease. Diabetes is very deadly if not caught in early stages of kidney problem. Kidneys play a big role to functions of human body. When kidney is fail and builds wasters in your body then your blood pressure is rise and your body may retain excess fluid. There are so many reasons of kidney failure and possible symptoms i.e. · Swelling of your legs, ankles · Breath shortness · High blood pressure · Fatigue · Loss of appetite · Weakness of muscles · Abnormal urine output · Nausea - vomiting How to diagnosed kidney disease problem by Ayurveda Many research about of kidney failure and they have proved Ayurvedic kidney treatment is very effective for kidney disease and controlling of urea by Ayurveda. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology University of Khartoum, Sudan Introduction DKA is a serious acute complications of Diabetes Mellitus. It carries significant risk of death and/or morbidity especially with delayed treatment. The prognosis of DKA is worse in the extremes of age, with a mortality rates of 5-10%. With the new advances of therapy, DKA mortality decreases to > 2%. Before discovery and use of Insulin (1922) the mortality was 100%. Epidemiology DKA is reported in 2-5% of known type 1 diabetic patients in industrialized countries, while it occurs in 35-40% of such patients in Africa. DKA at the time of first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is reported in only 2-3% in western Europe, but is seen in 95% of diabetic children in Sudan. Similar results were reported from other African countries . Consequences The latter observation is annoying because it implies the following: The late diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in many developing countries particularly in Africa. The late presentation of DKA, which is associated with risk of morbidity & mortality Death of young children with DKA undiagnosed or wrongly diagnosed as malaria or meningitis. Pathophysiology Secondary to insulin deficiency, and the action of counter-regulatory hormones, blood glucose increases leading to hyperglycemia and glucosuria. Glucosuria causes an osmotic diuresis, leading to water & Na loss. In the absence of insulin activity the body fails to utilize glucose as fuel and uses fats instead. This leads to ketosis. Pathophysiology/2 The excess of ketone bodies will cause metabolic acidosis, the later is also aggravated by Lactic acidosis caused by dehydration & poor tissue perfusion. Vomiting due to an ileus, plus increased insensible water losses due to tachypnea will worsen the state of dehydr Continue reading >>

Anuria

Anuria

Anuria or anuresis occurs when the kidneys aren’t producing urine. A person may first experience oliguria, or low output of urine, and then progress to anuria. Urination is important in removing both waste and excess fluids from your body. Your kidneys produce between 1 and 2 quarts of urine a day. When you don’t urinate, waste, fluids, and electrolytes can build up in your body. A decrease or total lack of urination can complicate any underlying health problems. It may even become life-threatening. Anuria is primarily linked to acute (sudden or short-term) or chronic (long-term) kidney disease. It may also be associated with other health conditions that cause kidney ailments. If you’re experiencing this symptom, you’ll need to see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment. Early treatment can also help prevent possible life-threatening complications. Causes of anuria include: Diabetes: Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which in turn can lead to anuria from acute kidney failure. High blood pressure (hypertension): Over time this can damage the arteries surrounding your kidneys, disrupting kidney function. Kidney failure: This condition occurs when your kidneys can no longer provide key functions, including urine output. Chronic kidney disease: A form of long-term kidney failure, this condition decreases your body’s ability to remove waste through your urine. Kidney stones: Made from excess levels of minerals from your urine, kidney stones can get large and obstruct urine output, causing pain and other complications. Tumors in your kidneys: Not only can tumors interfere with kidney function, but they can also obstruct the urination process. To diagnose anuria, your doctor will first ask you about your symptoms. They might ask about: flu Continue reading >>

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Abstract Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Early recognition and aggressive treatment of ARF during DKA may im-prove the prognosis of these patients. We present a case report of a 12 year old female admitted to the hospital with severe DKA as the 1s t manifestation of her diabetes mellitus. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, and oliguric ARF. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was noted during the course of DKA which probably contributed to the ARF. Management of DKA and renal replacement therapy resulted in quick recovery of renal function. We suggest that early initiation of renal replacement therapy for patients with DKA developing ARF may improve the potentially poor outcome of patients with ARF associated with DKA. Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis happens when your body resorts to fat for energy after your stored carbohydrates have been burned out. It often occurs when people fast and exercise. But most commonly, ketosis occurs in people who eat low-carb, high-protein diets, which are also called ketogenic diets. There’s some evidence that ketosis can tax your kidneys, leading to kidney stones and low blood pressure. In diabetics, a variant of ketosis can be fatal. However, a small but growing group of health professionals say ketosis is not the poison you’ve been lead to think it was, and it may be better for you than high-carbohydrate eating. Your specific dietary habits are best advised by your healthcare provider or nutritionist. Video of the Day Ketosis happens when you get a buildup of a substance known as ketones, or ketone bodies in your blood. They are released when your body’s carbohydrate stores run out and you have to break down fat stores for energy. Dieters tend to deliberately cause ketosis because it makes you feel less hungry. However, ketosis also makes you feel tired and sluggish, because as "Medical News Today" reports, ketones aren’t the most efficient source of energy, especially for your brain. Ketosis can also harm your kidneys. Annually, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure in the United States, reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, or NIDDK. The condition is marked by the inability of your kidneys to do their job of eliminating wastes. One treatment for kidney failure is dialysis, a draining and lengthy artificial blood cleansing process. Another option is a kidney transplant. The NIDDK states that the cost of care for patients with kidney failure reached close to $32 billion in 2005. The federal government sub Continue reading >>

Invokana Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Amputation Lawsuits

Invokana Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Amputation Lawsuits

If you or someone you love have suffered side effects such as Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Kidney Disease, Acute/Kidney Failure, Heart Attack, Stroke or Amputation after starting Invokana, Invokamet, Farxiga, Jardiance, Xigduo XR or Glyxambi, you may be eligible for compensation through a defective drug lawsuit against the manufacturer. Our Invokana attorneys are standing by, waiting to assist. Lawsuits allege that Janssen / Johnson & Johnson, manufacturer of Invokana, a popular type two diabetes drug, failed to warn both the medical community and consumers of serious potential side effects including heart attacks, stroke, amputation, kidney failure, kidney disease and diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition, usually requiring hospitalization due to the possibility of fatal brain swelling, coma, and severe dehydration. It’s also been alleged that had the public been properly warned, doctors and patients may have chosen something other than Invokana for diabetes management or at the very least, monitored for health issues more frequently. New Lawsuit Accuses Johnson & Johnson, Janssen Pharmaceuticals of Failure to Adequately Research Invokana and Failure to Warn of Health Risks July 13, 2017 – In a lawsuit filed July 3, 2017, plaintiff Martha Williams of Tennessee accuses Janssen Pharmaceuticals and parent company Johnson & Johnson of failure to adequately research all potential health risks of its new generation diabetes drug Invokana as well as failure to warn the public and medical community of such risks. The lawsuit blames an onset of acute renal failure, a urinary tract infection, dehydration and hypokalemia suffered by Williams just one month after starting the medication. “Consumers of Invokana and their physicians relied on the Defendants’ f Continue reading >>

More in ketosis