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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Kidney Failure

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

A while back I posted on a paper that appeared in The Lancet about an obese woman who came to the emergency room with gastroenteritis and was misdiagnosed as being in diabetic ketoacidosis (a life-threatening disorder). She was misdiagnosed because the pinheads covering the ER couldn’t get past the fact that she had been on a low-carb diet. At the time I posted on this travesty I noted that this Lancet paper would from here on out be waved in the face of anyone who was following or advocated a low-carb diet as proof that such a diet is dangerous and can cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Well, now we’ve got an answer. Next time someone tells you that it has been proven that low-carb diets are dangerous and can cause ketoacidosis, you can resort to poker terminology and reply that you’ll see their ketoacidosis and raise them a renal failure. A few days ago I got wind of a paper published a few years ago that can be used as a counterpoint to the above mentioned idiotic paper in The Lancet that has given low-carbers such a bad time. This paper, published in the journal Renal Failure in 1998, is, like the other paper, a case report. The short version is as follows: An obese young man arrived comatose in the emergency room. In an effort to lose weight he had been consuming a high-carbohydrate canned beverage as his sole source of nutrition for the two weeks prior. His blood sugar–at about 20 times normal–was extremely elevated and led to a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. The physicians on staff treated the patient appropriately, and he, over the next 20 hours or so, regained consciousness as his blood sugar levels and other lab parameters began to normalize. During a lab analysis 22 hours after admission the doctors found the patient to be breaking down and rel Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease Masquerading As Acute Pancreatitis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease Masquerading As Acute Pancreatitis

Robin George Manappallil Department of Medicine, Mar Baselios Medical Mission Hospital, Kothamangalam, Ernakulam, Kerala, India. Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life threatening acute complication of type 1 diabetes. Since diabetic patients may have hypertriglyceridemia, they are at risk of developing acute pancreatitis (AP). Hyperamylasemia may suggest a diagnosis of AP, but levels may be elevated in DKA. Hence, serum lipase levels correlate better with the diagnosis of AP. However, pancreatic enzymes are excreted by the kidneys and their levels are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report describes a patient with type 1 diabetes and CKD stage 4, not on hemodialysis, who presented with DKA and had very high levels of pancreatic enzymes in the absence of pancreatitis. Keywords : Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Kidney, Renal Insufficiency, Pancreatitis, Hypertriglyceridemia. Introduction Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. In 10-15% cases, the condition is life threatening. Epigastric pain is the predominant symptom, which may radiate to the back, chest, flanks or lower abdomen. Serum amylase and lipase levels are elevated in AP. Abdominal contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT), abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiological methods which aid in diagnosis of AP [1]. However, elevated pancreatic enzyme levels have been noted in CKD patients [2,3]. Features like epigastric pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes are also seen in DKA [4]. Moreover, AP can present or coexist with DKA [5,6]. This case report aims to highlight the importance of elevated pancreatic enzymes in DKA and CKD, and the diagnostic dilemma posed by such elevations in patients with these two illnesses. Case Repo Continue reading >>

Anuria

Anuria

Anuria or anuresis occurs when the kidneys aren’t producing urine. A person may first experience oliguria, or low output of urine, and then progress to anuria. Urination is important in removing both waste and excess fluids from your body. Your kidneys produce between 1 and 2 quarts of urine a day. When you don’t urinate, waste, fluids, and electrolytes can build up in your body. A decrease or total lack of urination can complicate any underlying health problems. It may even become life-threatening. Anuria is primarily linked to acute (sudden or short-term) or chronic (long-term) kidney disease. It may also be associated with other health conditions that cause kidney ailments. If you’re experiencing this symptom, you’ll need to see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment. Early treatment can also help prevent possible life-threatening complications. Causes of anuria include: Diabetes: Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which in turn can lead to anuria from acute kidney failure. High blood pressure (hypertension): Over time this can damage the arteries surrounding your kidneys, disrupting kidney function. Kidney failure: This condition occurs when your kidneys can no longer provide key functions, including urine output. Chronic kidney disease: A form of long-term kidney failure, this condition decreases your body’s ability to remove waste through your urine. Kidney stones: Made from excess levels of minerals from your urine, kidney stones can get large and obstruct urine output, causing pain and other complications. Tumors in your kidneys: Not only can tumors interfere with kidney function, but they can also obstruct the urination process. To diagnose anuria, your doctor will first ask you about your symptoms. They might ask about: flu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology University of Khartoum, Sudan Introduction DKA is a serious acute complications of Diabetes Mellitus. It carries significant risk of death and/or morbidity especially with delayed treatment. The prognosis of DKA is worse in the extremes of age, with a mortality rates of 5-10%. With the new advances of therapy, DKA mortality decreases to > 2%. Before discovery and use of Insulin (1922) the mortality was 100%. Epidemiology DKA is reported in 2-5% of known type 1 diabetic patients in industrialized countries, while it occurs in 35-40% of such patients in Africa. DKA at the time of first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is reported in only 2-3% in western Europe, but is seen in 95% of diabetic children in Sudan. Similar results were reported from other African countries . Consequences The latter observation is annoying because it implies the following: The late diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in many developing countries particularly in Africa. The late presentation of DKA, which is associated with risk of morbidity & mortality Death of young children with DKA undiagnosed or wrongly diagnosed as malaria or meningitis. Pathophysiology Secondary to insulin deficiency, and the action of counter-regulatory hormones, blood glucose increases leading to hyperglycemia and glucosuria. Glucosuria causes an osmotic diuresis, leading to water & Na loss. In the absence of insulin activity the body fails to utilize glucose as fuel and uses fats instead. This leads to ketosis. Pathophysiology/2 The excess of ketone bodies will cause metabolic acidosis, the later is also aggravated by Lactic acidosis caused by dehydration & poor tissue perfusion. Vomiting due to an ileus, plus increased insensible water losses due to tachypnea will worsen the state of dehydr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Acute kidney injury is a classical complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has reported the incidence and characteristics of acute kidney injury since the consensus definition was issued. Retrospective study of all cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis hospitalised consecutively in a medical surgical tertiary ICU during 10 years. Patients were dichotomised in with AKI and without AKI on admission according to the RIFLE classification. Clinical and biological parameters were compared in these populations. Risk factors of presenting AKI on admission were searched for. Results Ninety-four patients were included in the study. According to the RIFLE criteria, 47 patients (50%) presented acute kidney injury on admission; most of them were in the risk class (51%). At 12 and 24 hours, the percentage of AKI patients decreased to 26% and 27% respectively. During the first 24 hours, 3 patients needed renal replacement therapy. Acute renal failure on admission was associated with a more advanced age, SAPS 2 and more severe biological impairments. Treatments were not different between groups except for insulin infusion. Logistic regression found 3 risk factors of presenting AKI on admission: age (odds ratio 1.060 [1.020–1.100], p<0.01), blood glucose (odds ratio 1.101 [1.039–1.166], p<0.01) and serum protein (odds ratio 0.928 [0.865–0.997], p = 0.04). Acute kidney injury is frequently associated with severe diabetic ketoacidosis on admission in ICU. Most of the time, this AKI is transient and characterised by a volume-responsiveness to fluid infusion used in DKA treatment. Age, blood glucose and serum protein are associated to the occurrence of AKI on ICU admission. Figures Citation: Orban J-C, Maizière E-M, Ghaddab A, V Continue reading >>

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1 King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada, Canada 2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada Click here for correspondence address and email Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Early recognition and aggressive treatment of ARF during DKA may improve the prognosis of these patients. We present a case report of a 12 year old female admitted to the hospital with severe DKA as the 1s t manifestation of her diabetes mellitus. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, and oliguric ARF. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was noted during the course of DKA which probably contributed to the ARF. Management of DKA and renal replacement therapy resulted in quick recovery of renal function. We suggest that early initiation of renal replacement therapy for patients with DKA developing ARF may improve the potentially poor outcome of patients with ARF associated with DKA. How to cite this article: Al-Matrafi J, Vethamuthu J, Feber J. Severe acute renal failure in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2009;20:831-4 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs in 10 to 70% of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and has a significant risk of mortality, mostly due to cerebral edema. [1] Other potential complications of DKA include hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hypoglycemia, intracerebral and peripheral venous thrombosis, mucormycosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure (ARF) and sepsis. The development of ARF with rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal diso Continue reading >>

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Abstract Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Early recognition and aggressive treatment of ARF during DKA may im-prove the prognosis of these patients. We present a case report of a 12 year old female admitted to the hospital with severe DKA as the 1s t manifestation of her diabetes mellitus. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, and oliguric ARF. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was noted during the course of DKA which probably contributed to the ARF. Management of DKA and renal replacement therapy resulted in quick recovery of renal function. We suggest that early initiation of renal replacement therapy for patients with DKA developing ARF may improve the potentially poor outcome of patients with ARF associated with DKA. Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and young adults carries significant morbidity and mortality relating to complications such as cerebral oedema. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of DKA. We present three cases of DKA complicated by AKI. Case 1: A 9-year-old girl presented with severe DKA at diagnosis. She was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin as per protocol. She had oliguria and haematuria 36 h after admission. She was hypertensive with evidence of enlarged kidneys on ultrasound (USS). She was transferred to the renal unit where she needed two cycles of hemodialysis before making full recovery. Case 2: A 14-year-old girl presented with severe DKA and altered consciousness at diagnosis. She developed oliguria 24 h after starting treatment for DKA. USS of abdomen showed enlarged kidneys. Her renal function improved with haemofiltration and recovered fully by 1 week. Case 3: A 17-year-old girl with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes presented with severe DKA. She showed evidence of AKI with very high plasma creatinine, oliguria and low plasma phosphate. She was managed conservatively with individualised fluid plan and phosphate supplementation with recovery in 7 days. Conclusion: Patients with severe DKA can develop AKI due to a number of possible causes, hypovolaemia being the most likely primary cause. Appropriate management of hypovolemia and electrolyte disturbance in these patients can be very challenging. These cases highlight the importance of early recognition of AKI (rising plasma creatinine, oliguria, and haematuria) and discussion with paediatric nephrologist to formulate individualised fluid therapy in order to prevent deterioration in renal function. It is uncertain if recent modification in flu Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Hyperglycemic Emergencies On The Kidney And Liver

The Impact Of Hyperglycemic Emergencies On The Kidney And Liver

Copyright © 2013 Feng Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Studies on the alterations of liver and kidney function parameters in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK) were limited. Participants with DKA, DK, non-DK, and healthy controls were enrolled in the current study. Parameters of liver and kidney function were measured and evaluated. The patients with DKA had higher levels of plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), uric acid, and creatinine but lower levels of transferases and protein compared with the other three groups ( for all). The patients with DK had higher levels of plasma glucose and HbA1c but lower levels of glutamyl transpeptidase and protein compared with the non-DK and control groups (). Prealbumin levels were significantly reduced in the severe DKA patients compared with the mild/moderate DKA patients. Serum prealbumin levels were correlated with albumin levels (, ), HCO3 (, ), and arterial pH (, ) in the DKA patients. A diagnostic analysis showed that lower prealbumin levels significantly reflected the presence of hyperglycemic emergencies (). Liver and kidney function parameters deteriorated, especially in DKA. Prealbumin levels can be of value in detecting the presence of hyperglycemic crisis. This clinical trial is registered with ChiCTR-OCH-12003077. 1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK) are common and serious complications of diabetes mellitus. DKA most often occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, increasing evidence indicates that DKA and DK are also common features of ketosis-pr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Kidney Injury

A new Journal of American Medical Association article has shown that there is a high rate of occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in children hospitalized with a diagnosis diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Acute kidney injury is one of the most common causes of renal injury that can arise from several aetiologies. Based on predisposing factors, the causes may be categorized into 3 classes: pre-renal, renal or post-renal. In cases of volume depletion, like that which occurs in diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication of diabetes where there is high ketone production), perfusion to kidneys is impaired and that is when the kidneys start to lose their functioning. Since acute kidney injury in children is associated with a poor short term and long term outcome, in a new JAMA article, and for the first time, researchers have evaluated the rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for the diabetic ketoacidosis. This study was conducted at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital from 2008 through 2013. 165 children aged 18 years or younger with type 1 diabetes, DKA and with complete medical records available for data analysis were included. The primary outcome was the development of acute kidney injury defined using Kidney Disease/Improving Global Outcomes serum creatinine criteria. As per findings, in the designed timeframe, of the 165 children hospitalized for DKA, 106 (64.2%) developed AKI.Two children required hemodialysis. Statistical analysis has shown that a serum bicarbonate level of less than 10 mEq/L was associated with a 5-fold increased risk of developing severe kidney injury. This means that the incidence of acute kidney injury is directly associated with the severity of the acidosis resulting from DKA. Increase in heart rate (demo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Invokana Caused Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Patient Claims

Diabetes Medication Invokana Caused Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Patient Claims

Diabetes medication Invokana is at the center of a lawsuit alleging the drug can lead to ketoacidosis, kidney failure, stroke and heart attack. Invokana from Johnson & Johnson is used to maintain lower blood sugar levels in adults with type-2 diabetes. It works by making the kidneys remove sugar from the body through the urine rather than have it be reabsorbed into the blood. As a result of this action, patients can develop dehydration, which taxes the kidneys. Plaintiff Frederick S. says he started taking diabetes medication Invokana in February 2015. By mid-July 2015, Frederick “suffered from diabetic ketoacidosis, acute renal failure, acute kidney failure and urosepsis,” he claims. The latter is a severe bacterial infection of the blood that can injure the kidneys. The FDA approved diabetes medication Invokana in 2014 to help maintain blood sugar levels in type-2 diabetics. It was the first in a new class of medications called SGLT2 inhibitors that eliminate excess glucose (sugar) by sending it through the kidneys and out the urine instead of allowing the glucose back into the bloodstream. In December 2015, the FDA ordered all manufacturers of SGLT2 inhibitors to include warning labels about the risk of ketoacidosis. At that time, the drugs were also made to add warnings regarding an increased risk of urinary tract infections as well. In Frederick’s Invokana lawsuit, Johnson & Johnson is accused of “through their marketing materials, misrepresented and exaggerated the effectiveness of Invokana, both as to its ability to lower glucose, and its benefit for non-surrogate measures of health, such as reducing adverse cardiovascular outcomes.” The diabetes medication Invokana lawsuit contends, “Because Invokana prevents patients from using a significant amount Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy - Kidney Disease

Diabetic Nephropathy - Kidney Disease

Tweet Kidney disease amongst diabetics is commonly called diabetic nephropathy. Statistically, around 40% of people with diabetes develop nephropathy but it is possible to prevent or delay through control of both blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Diabetes affects the arteries of the body and as the kidneys filter blood from many arteries, kidney problems are a particular risk for people with diabetes. What is diabetic nephropathy? Nephropathy is a general term for the deterioration of proper functioning in the kidneys. At an advanced level, this is called end-stage renal disease or ESRD. ESRD often stems from diabetes, with diabetes causing just under half of all cases. Diabetic nephropathy can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy is divided into five stages of deterioration, with the final one being ESRD. It commonly takes over 20 years for patients to reach stage 5. Symptoms of kidney disease The symptoms of diabetic nephropathy tend to become apparent once the condition has reached the later stages. Typically the following symptoms may start to be noticed around stage four of its progression: Swelling of the ankles, feet, lower legs or hands caused by retention of water Darker urine, caused by blood in the urine Becoming short of breath, when climbing the stairs for instance Tiredness as a result of a lack of oxygen in the blood Nausea or vomiting To help catch nephropathy before the later stages develop, people with diabetes should be screened for kidney complications once a year. The screening test involves a simple urine sample which is tested to detect whether protein is present in the urine. Read more on kidney disease screening What are the causes of diabetic nephropathy? Statistics show that development of kidney dise Continue reading >>

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