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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Joint Pain

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Glyxambi?

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Glyxambi?

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about GLYXAMBI? Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking GLYXAMBI, tell your doctor if you have ever had pancreatitis, gallstones, a history of alcoholism, or high triglyceride levels. Stop taking GLYXAMBI and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Heart failure. Heart failure means your heart does not pump blood well enough. Before you start taking GLYXAMBI, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms: increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing, especially when you lie down; swelling or fluid retention, especially in the feet, ankles or legs; an unusually fast increase in weight or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Dehydration. GLYXAMBI can cause some people to have dehydration (the loss of body water and salt). Dehydration may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, light-headed, or weak, especially when you stand up. You may be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics), are on a low salt diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age or older. Ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine). Ketoacidosis is a serious condition, which may need to be treated in the hospital. Ketoacidosis may lead to death. Ketoacidosis occurs in people with type 1 diabetes and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis, also referred to as simply ketoacidosis or DKA, is a serious and even life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes. DKA is rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA is caused when insulin levels are low and not enough glucose can get into the body's cells. Without glucose for energy, the body starts to burn fat for energy. Ketones are products that are created when the body burns fat. The buildup of ketones causes the blood to become more acidic. The high levels of blood glucose in DKA cause the kidneys to excrete glucose and water, leading to dehydration and imbalances in body electrolyte levels. Diabetic ketoacidosis most commonly develops either due to an interruption in insulin treatment or a severe illness, including the flu. What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The development of DKA is usually a slow process. However, if vomiting develops, the symptoms can progress more rapidly due to the more rapid loss of body fluid. Excessive urination, which occurs because the kidneys try to rid the body of excess glucose, and water is excreted along with the glucose High blood glucose (sugar) levels The presence of ketones in the urine Other signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis occur as the condition progresses: These include: Fatigue, which can be severe Flushing of the skin Fruity odor to the breath, caused by ketones Difficulty breathing Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication What should I do if I think I may have, or someone I know may diabetic ketoacidosis? You should test your urine for ketones if you suspect you have early symptoms or warning signs of ketoacidosis. Call your health-care professional if your urine shows high levels of ketones. High levels of ketones and high blood sug Continue reading >>

What Causes Joint Pain In The Human Body?

What Causes Joint Pain In The Human Body?

The most important detail in answering this question is: Is the pain acute (less than 6 months' duration and of more sudden onset, perhaps due to functional injury) or chronic (greater than 6 months' duration, and probably a combination of local tissue dysfunction and broader CNS dysfunctional feedback)? If the pain is acute, the most probable answer is soft-tissue damage and myofascial (muscle and connective tissue) dysfunction. The cartilage and bone have not had enough time to develop anatomical problems that result in bonafide arthritis, and there are innumerable studies that document acute injuries that are a direct result of damage and/or activation of myofascial trigger points in muscle and innervated connective tissue, resulting in immediate pain. If the physician examining the joint in question is able to determine, through the examination process, that the joint - and patient, via their medical history - doesn't have any obvious predisposition toward pain in the said joint, the physician has historically diagnosed "arthritis", and given the patient an injection of a corticosteroid into the joint. If the pain was primarily an inflammatory reaction to an acute injurious event, this was often effective. Corticosteroids are very powerful medications for treatment of local inflammatory reactions. But what if the patient reported no relief from the cortisone injection?? This would indicate that the mechanism of pain was not primarily modulated my inflammation, but by something else. But what? Researchers in the 1980s began looking at this exact question, because just about any diagnosis of joint pain was "arthritis". It seemed obvious that the structures that were more deeply investigated (bone, cartilage, ligament, bursa) would be the focus of injuries' studies. Bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

What happens to a person’s blood sugar when they are under stress due to pain, and must take a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone? In this article, we will explore what happens to a person with diabetes who is taking long term pain medication. We will look at whether it raises or lowers blood glucose. We will look at how taking oxycodone affects blood glucose levels, activity levels and appetite, and how that could influence the self-management of diabetes. We will look at ways that you can maintain blood glucose in target ranges while taking a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone. John’s story As John relayed to me during a phone conversation, he is taking a combination of oxycodone plus acetaminophen for severe pain in his legs related to poor circulation and neuropathy because of his Type 1 diabetes. He has had severe sleep disruption, and was getting no relief on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. He has been taking oxycodone now for about three months, and has seen a need to increase the basal rate on his insulin pump in order to stay in target range with his blood glucose. He found that once the stress of the pain was gone, his numbers have stayed in range. I suggest reading the following: What is oxycodone? Oxycodone is a narcotic pain reliever that is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It is in the class of drugs called “opiate analgesics,” and can be found in combination with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen. Oxycodone can also be found in combination with aspirin and acetaminophen. Each of these components can also have side effects in addition to the oxycodone. Brand names of combination medications include Nortab, Vicodin, and Lortab and Percocet. Precautions for oxycodo Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. Asked by Mike from Tennessee Can diabetes be a (possible) cause of fatigue, leg and lower back aches? I have had bursts of energy for 10 to 15 minutes, but then need to sit for about 10 minutes, and I'm ready to go full steam again. PLEASE, Thank You, Mike Expert answer Dear Mike: Thanks for an important question, as a lot of people with diabetes complain of these symptoms. The answer is that diabetes itself probably is not the cause of your fatigue, lower back and leg aches. The things that cause type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset diabetes), such as a weight problem and lack of exercise, are commonly the cause these symptoms. Fatigue incorporates three components: 1. The inability to initiate activity. 2. Reduced ability to maintain activity. 3. Difficulty with concentration and memory. Fatigue should be distinguished from sleepiness, shortness of breath on exertion and muscle weakness, although these can also be associated with fatigue. Fatigue lasting six months or more is referred to as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is not necessarily the entity known as chronic fatigue syndrome, which is a diagnosis after exclusion of all other causes. Fatigue in anyone should be evaluated by a health care provider to exclude all possible causes and to get counseling on how to treat it. Other medical causes of fatigue are the side effect of drugs, thyroid dysfunction, high calcium levels, rheumatologic illnesses, adrenal, kidney or liver problems. Some infections such as tuberculosis or hepatitis can cause fatigue, and indeed, fatigue can be their only symptom. Depression is also a major cause of fatigue. While unus Continue reading >>

Can Sleeping With Bent Knees Cause Joint Pain?

Can Sleeping With Bent Knees Cause Joint Pain?

Try NOT Eating The Breakfast of Champions! I was a thin, 185#, 6 foot tall, life long runner (10-25 miles/week, street running, concrete/asphalt) until I hit 50. And then I developed serious knee pain which included pain when I slept with my knees together. Two different sports docs said it was osteoarthritis and suggested if I wanted to walk well for the rest of my life, I probably needed to hang up my running shoes. I did and gained 30# that year. Then joined a gym, traded some of the fat for muscle, but never lost much weight, which seems to be a very typical gym story. I biked and rollerbladed for stress and to burn some calories. I got a lot of arthritis pain relief over the years from taking SAMe, a natural enzyme that declines as you age and helps your joins deal with inflammation. My peak weight year was in 2005 at 232# before retiring from an IT office job. In spring of 2013 all that changed when I read the NYT's best seller, Wheat Belly by William Davis MD. Tried it just hoping to lose a few pounds and maybe the love handles. Less than 2 weeks into it, I realized I hadn't taken the SAMe since day 10, and my knees were PAIN FREE. Other joins were much better too, as well as skin and hair. Now on a good day, I literally feel 20 years younger. At 69 I'll never do 25 mile weeks on asphalt again, but I do 200 yard wind sprints down the beach barefoot like a teenager. You can't imagine how great that feels! All my joints feel better, pain free, much better flexibility, and smooth motion. My hair and skin are much better. My weight has been stable at 200# for 2 years without being hungry, counting calories, or binge eating. On a bad day, like when I been accidentally wheated trying unknown foods at a pitch in or a niece's wedding cake, the arthritis returns, hair sta Continue reading >>

Joint Pain And Bone Conditions

Joint Pain And Bone Conditions

Tweet Diabetes affects both the nerves and circulation which can result in joint pain and disorders developing in a number of areas of the body. In terms of the complications of diabetes, joint disorders tend to get mentioned less than the likes of retinopathy and kidney disease but some of the conditions can be serious. Charcot foot Charcot foot, also known as Charcot arthropathy and Charcot joint, is the name for a condition which causes the foot to swell and, in progressed cases, deform. Symptoms of Charcot foot include: Swelling or redness of joints in the foot Affected foot being warmer than the non-affected foot Pain in the affected area will be noticed Charcot foot can affect any of the weight bearing joints in the foot including the ankle. Charcot joint can be treated but the treatment takes time, up to several months, typically involving casting the foot and taking weight off it. Read more about Charcot foot Osteoporosis Osteoporosis, meaning porous bones, is a condition which causes bones to weaken. Areas which tend to be affected are the spine, wrist and hips. Symptoms develop slowly and can be hard to notice until an event causes a bone to break or fracture, termed as a ‘fragility fracture’. Treatment may include extra vitamin D and/or calcium in your diet and exercises to build up strength in the bones are often prescribed. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis includes inflammation of the tissues in the joints and damage to cartilage. People who are overweight put extra strain on their joints and can increase the risk of osteoarthritis as well as making the condition more pronounced. Osteoarthritis symptoms Symptoms include: Pain Stiffness A grating sound or a limited range of mobility in the joints. Osteoarthritis becomes more likely in old age, with 50 years Continue reading >>

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are generally more susceptible to infections, which can cause hyperglycaemia and trigger diabetic ketoacidosis.1 In many cases, the focus of infection, such as the urinary or respiratory tract, may be apparent at presentation. Occasionally, however, patients can present with unusual foci of infection and vague clinical symptoms and signs. Both epidural2–5 and psoas6,7 abscesses have been reported in diabetics, but mainly in adults with longstanding disease. Presentation with an epidural abscess and psoas abscess in the same patient is extremely rare in adults, particularly at first presentation of IDDM,2 and, to our knowledge, has not been reported in children. CASE REPORT A 12 year old boy of mixed race (White/Afro-Caribbean) presented to casualty with a three day history of central abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, and low back pain, followed by a five hour history of difficulty in breathing. There was no previous history of respiratory problems, polyuria, polydipsia, or weight loss. His past medical history was unremarkable with normal development and no previous acute hospital admissions. On examination, he was 10% dehydrated with cold peripheries, dry mucous membranes, sunken eyes, and reduced skin turgor. He had Kussmaul breathing, with a respiratory rate of 60 breaths per minute, but good bilateral air entry on auscultation and no wheeze or crackles. There was no lymphadenopathy but he was noted to be anaemic. Axillary temperature was 36.0°C on admission. His heart rate was regular at 120 per minute with a blood pressure of 130/70 mm Hg. He had mild central abdominal pain with no hepatosplenomegaly. Examination of the spine revealed mild tenderness on palpation over the upper lumbar spine, but peripher Continue reading >>

The Frozen Shoulder: What's Diabetes Got To Do With It?

The Frozen Shoulder: What's Diabetes Got To Do With It?

Adhesive capsulitis—commonly known as frozen shoulder—can make routine activities like getting dressed and changing your insulin pump, nearly impossible. It is the the most prevalent upper body musculoskeletal injury in people with diabetes. Learn more. Adhesive casulitis, also known as frozen should, is a rheumatic condition which can leave you unable to reach above your head or behind your back. It results from inflammatory changes in the connective tissue of an area called the shoulder capsule. Over time, the tissue can thicken and become tight. Stiff bands of tissue called adhesions develop, making movement of the joint painful and even blocking the shoulder joint’s normal range of motion. Eventually the shoulder becomes extremely stiff and extremely painful to move, as if it’s “frozen” in place. If you wear an insulin pump, this condition can be especially challenging. DiabeticLifestyle Editorial Board Member Amy Hess Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE says she’s worked with several type 1 women diagnosed with frozen shoulder. “One of my patients who had long used an insulin pump, had to switch back to insulin injections until her shoulder issue resolved since inserting infusion sets was too difficult,” Hess Fischl explained. “Fortunately, she was able to resume her insulin pump after several months of regular physical therapy but in the interim more frequent communication was required between us to help her adjust her insulin doses to account for the pain, reduced sleep and less activity.” There are two types of adhesive capsulitis.In the first, there is no direct explanation for the condition and pain and stiffness come on so gradually that you may not notice it until it interferes with your daily activities. The second type is caused by some Continue reading >>

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of mortality in childhood diabetes.[1]The primary cause of DKA is absolute or relative insulin deficiency: Absolute - eg, previously undiagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus or a patient with known type 1 diabetes who does not take their insulin. Relative - stress causes a rise in counter-regulatory hormones with relative insulin deficiency. DKA can be fatal The usual causes of death are: Cerebral oedema - associated with 25% mortality (see 'Cerebral odedema', below). Hypokalaemia - which is preventable with good monitoring. Aspiration pneumonia - thus, use of a nasogastric tube in the semi-conscious or unconscious is advised. Deficiency of insulin. Rise in counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, and catecholamines. Thus, inappropriate gluconeogenesis and liver glycogenolysis occur compounding the hyperglycaemia, which causes hyperosmolarity and ensuing polyuria, dehydration and loss of electrolytes. Accelerated catabolism from lipolysis of adipose tissue leads to increased free fatty acid circulation, which on hepatic oxidation produces the ketone bodies (acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) that cause the metabolic acidosis. A vicious circle is usually set up as vomiting usually occurs compounding the stress and dehydration; the cycle can only be broken by providing insulin and fluids; otherwise, severe acidosis occurs and can be fatal. Biochemical criteria The biochemical criteria required for a diagnosis of DKA to be made are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Repaglinide (oral)

Repaglinide (oral)

Pronunciation: re PAG li nide Brand: Prandin Prandin 0.5 mg What is the most important information I should know about repaglinide? You should not use repaglinide if you have type 1 diabetes, severe liver disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). You should not use repaglinide together with gemfibrozil (Lopid) or NPH insulin (such as isophane insulin). What is repaglinide? Repaglinide is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels by causing the pancreas to produce insulin. Repaglinide is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Other diabetes medicines are sometimes used in combination with repaglinide if needed. Repaglinide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking repaglinide? You should not use repaglinide if you are allergic to it, or if you have: type 1 diabetes; severe liver disease; if you also take gemfibrozil; or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure repaglinide is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver disease; or if you also take metformin or other diabetes medicines. It is not known whether repaglinide will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Your doctor may recommend using insulin to be sure your blood sugar is well-controlled during pregnancy. It is not known whether repaglinide passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine. Do not give this medicine to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice. How should I take repaglinide? Follow all Continue reading >>

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

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