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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Fever

Glucocorticoid-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Acute Rheumatic Fever.

Glucocorticoid-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Acute Rheumatic Fever.

Abstract Glucocorticoids are used as anti-inflammatory agents and are associated with many side effects including hyperglycemia, hypertension, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, and so on. Hyperglycemia is a common side effect, but ketoacidosis is observed rarely. We present a girl who developed diabetic ketoacidosis after the administration of methylprednisolone during the treatment of acute rheumatic fever. She did not have diabetes and was not obese. She developed ketoacidosis after glucocorticoid therapy. Glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, lipolysis, and ketogenesis were likely to have precipitated ketoacidosis. During the treatment of ketoacidosis, the insulin need of the patient was gradually decreased by reducing glucocorticoid dose. In addition to the gradual reduction in glucocorticoid dose, salicylate therapy could be considered the treatment for insulin resistance. In this patient, screening for blood gases and urine was diagnostic in the diagnosis of ketoacidosis. The risk of ketoacidosis as well as hyperglycemia should be considered in the course of glucocorticoid therapy. Continue reading >>

What To Know If You Have Diabetes And The Flu

What To Know If You Have Diabetes And The Flu

When you have diabetes, do your best to avoid getting the flu, or influenza. Everyone has a chance of catching this viral infection, but people with diabetes have a harder time fighting it off. The flu can put added stress in your body, which can affect your blood sugar levels and raise the chance of serious health complications. What Are Symptoms of the Flu? They usually come on quickly and may include: Fever (usually high) Severe aches and pains in the joints and muscles and around the eyes Weakness For in-depth information, see Flu Symptoms: What You Might Feel. Which Medications Are Safe? You can take some over-the-counter medications to ease your symptoms. But make sure you read the label. Avoid products with high amounts of sugar. This often includes liquid cold and flu drugs, cough drops, and liquid cough medicines. Look for sugar-free products instead. For in-depth information, see Flu Treatment: The Basics. How Often Should I Check my Blood Sugar? You'll need to check often while you’re sick. Because you're ill and feel awful anyway, you may not notice changes in your blood sugar levels. Take a reading at least every 3 to 4 hours. Call your doctor about any major changes right away. You may need to adjust your insulin. Check your ketones, if you have type 1 diabetes. If they get too high, you might have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a coma or even death. High ketones are another reason to call your doctor. What Can I Eat? You may feel really crummy and not hungry or thirsty at all. Still, you have to eat to keep your blood sugar levels steady. Stick with foods from your regular meal plan. Eat about 15 grams of carbs every hour or so, like a slice of toast, 3/4 cup of frozen yogurt, or 1 cup of soup. Continue reading >>

The Emedicinehealth Doctors Ask About Diabetic Ketoacidosis:

The Emedicinehealth Doctors Ask About Diabetic Ketoacidosis:

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cont.) A person developing diabetic ketoacidosis may have one or more of these symptoms: excessive thirst or drinking lots of fluid, frequent urination, general weakness, vomiting, loss of appetite, confusion, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, a generally ill appearance, increased heart rate, low blood pressure, increased rate of breathing, and a distinctive fruity odor on the breath. If you have any form of diabetes, contact your doctor when you have very high blood sugars (generally more than 350 mg) or moderate elevations that do not respond to home treatment. At initial diagnosis your doctor should have provided you with specific rules for dosing your medication(s) and for checking your urinary ketone level whenever you become ill. If not, ask your health care practitioner to provide such "sick day rules." If you have diabetes and start vomiting, seek immediate medical attention. If you have diabetes and develop a fever, contact your health care practitioner. If you feel sick, check your urinary ketone levels with home test strips. If your urinary ketones are moderate or higher, contact your health care practitioner. People with diabetes should be taken to a hospital's emergency department if they appear significantly ill, dehydrated, confused, or very weak. Other reasons to seek immediate medical treatment include shortness of breath, chest pain, severe abdominal pain with vomiting, or high fever (above 101 F or 38.3 C). Continue Reading A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cont.) The diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis is typically made after the health care practitioner obtains a history, performs a physical examination, and reviews the laboratory tests. Blood tests will be ordered to document the levels of sugar, potassium, sodium, and oth Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies, Part 5: Dka Case Studies

Diabetic Emergencies, Part 5: Dka Case Studies

Case Study 1 A 32-year-old male with type 1 diabetes since the age of 14 years was taken to the emergency room because of drowsiness, fever, cough, diffuse abdominal pain, and vomiting. Fever and cough started 2 days ago and the patient could not eat or drink water. He has been treated with an intensive insulin regimen (insulin glargine 24 IU at bedtime and a rapid-acting insulin analog before each meal). On examination he was tachypneic, his temperature was 39° C (102.2° F), pulse rate 104 beats per minute, respiratory rate 24 breaths per minute, supine blood pressure 100/70 mmHg; he also had dry mucous membranes, poor skin turgor, and rales in the right lower chest. He was slightly confused. Rapid hematology and biochemical tests showed hematocrit 48%, hemoglobin 14.3 g/dl (143 g/L), white blood cell count 18,000/ μ l, glucose 450 mg/dl (25.0 mmol/L), urea 60 mg/dl (10.2 mmol/L), creatinine 1.4 mg/dl (123.7 μ mol/L), Na+ 152 mEq/L, K+ 5.3 mEq/L, PO4 3−2.3 mEq/L (0.74 mmol/L), and Cl− 110 mmol/L. Arterial pH was 6.9, PO 2 95 mmHg, PCO 2 28 mmHg, HCO 3−9 mEq/L, and O 2 sat 98%. The result of the strip for ketone bodies in urine was strongly positive and the concentration of β-OHB in serum was 3.5 mmol/L. Urinalysis showed glucose 800 mg/dl and specific gravity 1030. What is your diagnosis? The patient has hyperglycemia, ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. Therefore, he has DKA. In addition, because of the pre-existing fever, cough, localized rales on auscultation and high white blood cell count, a respiratory tract infection should be considered. The patient is also dehydrated and has impaired renal function. Do you need more tests to confirm the diagnosis? Determination of the effective serum osmolality and anion gap should be performed in all patients presenti Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis can affect both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients. It's a possible short-term complication of diabetes, one caused by hyperglycemia—and one that can be avoided. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are two of the most serious complications of diabetes. These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of mortality among persons with diabetes in spite of all of the advances in understanding diabetes. The annual incidence rate of DKA estimated from population-based studies ranges from 4.8 to 8 episodes per 1,000 patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, in the US, incidents of hospitalization due to DKA have increased. Currently, 4% to 9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes include DKA. The incidence of HHS is more difficult to determine because of lack of population studies but it is still high at around 15%. The prognosis of both conditions is substantially worsened at the extremes of age, and in the presence of coma and hypertension. Why and How Does Ketoacidosis Occur? The pathogenesis of DKA is more understood than HHS but both relate to the basic underlying reduction in the net effective action of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counter regulatory hormones such as glucagons, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. These hormonal alterations in both DKA and HHS lead to increased hepatic and renal glucose production and impaired use of glucose in peripheral tissues, which results in hyperglycemia and parallel changes in osmolality in extracellular space. This same combination also leads to release of free fatty acids into the circulation from adipose tissue and to unrestrained hepatic fatty acid oxidation to ketone bodies. Some drugs ca Continue reading >>

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of mortality in childhood diabetes.[1]The primary cause of DKA is absolute or relative insulin deficiency: Absolute - eg, previously undiagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus or a patient with known type 1 diabetes who does not take their insulin. Relative - stress causes a rise in counter-regulatory hormones with relative insulin deficiency. DKA can be fatal The usual causes of death are: Cerebral oedema - associated with 25% mortality (see 'Cerebral odedema', below). Hypokalaemia - which is preventable with good monitoring. Aspiration pneumonia - thus, use of a nasogastric tube in the semi-conscious or unconscious is advised. Deficiency of insulin. Rise in counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, and catecholamines. Thus, inappropriate gluconeogenesis and liver glycogenolysis occur compounding the hyperglycaemia, which causes hyperosmolarity and ensuing polyuria, dehydration and loss of electrolytes. Accelerated catabolism from lipolysis of adipose tissue leads to increased free fatty acid circulation, which on hepatic oxidation produces the ketone bodies (acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) that cause the metabolic acidosis. A vicious circle is usually set up as vomiting usually occurs compounding the stress and dehydration; the cycle can only be broken by providing insulin and fluids; otherwise, severe acidosis occurs and can be fatal. Biochemical criteria The biochemical criteria required for a diagnosis of DKA to be made are Continue reading >>

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)?

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) often gives plenty of warning before it happens, but it can also occur with little warning. If you regularly check your blood glucose several times during the day, you won’t miss the most important warning signs: high blood glucose and ketones in your urine. Test your urine for ketones whenever your blood glucose is over 300 mg/dl or you feel ill. Signs of DKA include the following: High blood glucose above 240 mg/dl and not falling Classic signs of hyperglycemia: intense thirst, dry mouth, need to urinate frequently Lack of appetite or pains in your stomach Vomiting or nausea Blurry vision Fever or warm, dry, or flushed skin Difficulty breathing Feeling of weakness Sleepiness A fruity odor on your breath If you have high blood glucose, ketones, and dehydration, you can have a serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). With severe DKA you might have to go to the hospital or clinic for intravenous fluids and insulin. DKA can become a medical emergency. Besides high blood glucose and ketones, DKA can come with these symptoms: chills, fever deep, labored breathing -- called "Kussmaul respirations" Sweet, fruity-smelling breath Dehydration (dry mouth, dry eyes, little or no urination, dark circles under the eyes) Tenderness or pain in your stomach area Confusion, slowness, or drowsiness Call your doctor or diabetes educator if you have vomiting or the symptoms above along with blood glucose over 300 mg/dL and ketones. Your doctor can decide whether you should treat it at home -- or whether you need to go to a hospital. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Clinical Presentation

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Clinical Presentation

History Insidious increased thirst (ie, polydipsia) and urination (ie, polyuria) are the most common early symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Malaise, generalized weakness, and fatigability also can present as symptoms of DKA. Nausea and vomiting usually occur and may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia. A history of rapid weight loss is a symptom in patients who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Patients may present with a history of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons. Decreased perspiration is another possible symptom of DKA. Altered consciousness in the form of mild disorientation or confusion can occur. Although frank coma is uncommon, it may occur when the condition is neglected or if dehydration or acidosis is severe. Among the symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are fever, dysuria, coughing, malaise, chills, chest pain, shortness of breath, and arthralgia. Acute chest pain or palpitation may occur in association with myocardial infarction. Painless infarction is not uncommon in patients with diabetes and should always be suspected in elderly patients. A study by Crossen et al indicated that in children with type 1 diabetes, those who have had a recent emergency department visit and have undergone a long period without visiting an endocrinologist are more likely to develop DKA. The study included 5263 pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. [15] Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

When There Are Acute Changes In Mental Status In Patients With Diabetes

When There Are Acute Changes In Mental Status In Patients With Diabetes

Author(s): Adam Lang, BS, and Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, FACFAOM As podiatric physicians in 2010, we are better trained than ever to manage patients’ problems. Even more importantly, we are well versed in making appropriate, well-timed referrals when needed. In the following case study, that particular acumen was critically important. A 78-year-old male with type 2 diabetes underwent resection of the first metatarsophalangeal base and debridement of an underlying ulcer, which has at times been infected. The plan was to inspect the bone for osteomyelitis, place the patient on oral antibiotics and not primarily close the plantar lesion, but pack it open instead. Resection of the phalangeal base would ease the deforming hallux interphalangeus. Examination revealed a hallux limitus and the physician determined that at the patient’s age and activity level, a Keller arthroplasty would serve him well, preventing further breakdown and possible osteomyelitis. The plantar lesion did not undergo primary closure but physicians packed it instead. The hospital discharged the patient within a week after bone cultures and histology showed no evidence of osteomyelitis. He received a prescription for oral antibiotics and received instruction to keep a clinic appointment in 48 hours. However, he was a no-show for his appointment. Phone calls to his home, all of which were documented, went unanswered over a period of two weeks. About a month after his discharge from the hospital, the patient went to the emergency department of the hospital accompanied by his wife. His extremity was in the same dressing he received upon preparation for discharge although now it was soiled and loose. His wife reported that they had never filled the prescription for antibiotics because they “did not und Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms These symptoms are due to the ketone poisoning and should never be ignored. As soon as a person begins to vomit or has difficulty breathing, immediate treatment in an emergency room is required to prevent coma and possible death. Early Signs, Symptoms: Late Signs, Symptoms: very tired and sleepy weakness great thirst frequent urination dry skin and tongue leg cramps fruity odor to the breath* upset stomach* nausea* vomiting* shortness of breath sunken eyeballs very high blood sugars rapid pulse rapid breathing low blood pressure unresponsiveness, coma * these are more specific for ketoacidosis than hyperosmolar syndrome Everyone with diabetes needs to know how to recognize and treat ketoacidosis. Ketones travel from the blood into the urine and can be detected in the urine with ketone test strips available at any pharmacy. Ketone strips should always be kept on hand, but stored in a dry area and replaced as soon as they become outdated. Measurement of Ketones in the urine is very important for diabetics with infections or on insulin pump therapy due to the fact it gives more information than glucose tests alone. Check the urine for ketones whenever a blood sugar reading is 300 mg/dl or higher, if a fruity odor is detected in the breath, if abdominal pain is present, if nausea or vomiting is occurring, or if you are breathing rapidly and short of breath. If a moderate or large amount of ketones are detected on the test strip, ketoacidosis is present and immediate treatment is required. Symptoms for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are linked to dehydration rather than acidosis, so a fruity odor to the breath and stomach upset are less likely. How To Detect Ketones During any illness, especially when it is severe and any time the stomach becomes upset, ketone Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Grade Iii With Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report.

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Grade Iii With Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report.

Abstract A 16-year-old, previously healthy Thai girl presented with DHF grade III. Fifteen hours after the first episode of shock, she had received an excessive amount of crystalloid isotonic solution and 20 ml per kilograms of Dextran-40 however she still had persistently rapid pulse rate and high hematocrit but also had polyuria with more than 4 ml/kg/hr of urine output. She was re-evaluated. Clinical signs showed severe dehydration with some ascites without signs of pleural effusion. Blood gas revealed increased anion gap metabolic acidosis. The cause of polyuria and metabolic acidosis was identified with hyperglycemia, ketouria and glucosuria. Afterwards she was diagnosed and treated as DHF grade III and DKA. Besides insulin administration, fluid resuscitation was very crucial. Intravenous fluid rehydration was needed while the unnecessary extra-volume could cause massive plasma leakage and later on fluid overload. Volume replacement was adjusted to degree of dehydration when signs of volume overload were monitored closely. She was out of DKA at 14 hours after the start of insulin and the intravenous fluid was stopped at 27 hours (36 hours after the first episode of shock). The final diagnosis was DHF grade III, diabetes mellitus with DKA and hepatitis. Continue reading >>

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