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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Chest Pains?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic acidosis is a life-threatening condition that can occur in people with type 1 diabetes. Less commonly, it can also occur with type 2 diabetes. Term watch Ketones: breakdown products from the use of fat stores for energy. Ketoacidosis: another name for diabetic acidosis. It happens when a lack of insulin leads to: Diabetic acidosis requires immediate hospitalisation for urgent treatment with fluids and intravenous insulin. It can usually be avoided through proper treatment of Type 1 diabetes. However, ketoacidosis can also occur with well-controlled diabetes if you get a severe infection or other serious illness, such as a heart attack or stroke, which can cause vomiting and resistance to the normal dose of injected insulin. What causes diabetic acidosis? The condition is caused by a lack of insulin, most commonly when doses are missed. While insulin's main function is to lower the blood sugar level, it also reduces the burning of body fat. If the insulin level drops significantly, the body will start burning fat uncontrollably while blood sugar levels rise. Glucose will then begin to show up in your urine, along with ketone bodies from fat breakdown that turn the body acidic. The body attempts to reduce the level of acid by increasing the rate and depth of breathing. This blows off carbon dioxide in the breath, which tends to correct the acidosis temporarily (known as acidotic breathing). At the same time, the high secretion of glucose into the urine causes large quantities of water and salts to be lost, putting the body at serious risk of dehydration. Eventually, over-breathing becomes inadequate to control the acidosis. What are the symptoms? Since diabetic acidosis is most often linked with high blood sugar levels, symptoms are the same as those for diabetes Continue reading >>

Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis As An Initial Presentation Of Cushing’s Syndrome

Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis As An Initial Presentation Of Cushing’s Syndrome

Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute metabolic disorder characterized by markedly increased circulating ketone bodies e.g. beta-hydroxybutyrate, aceto-acetate and acetone in the presence of hyperglycemia. DKA is a serious and potentially life-threatening metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus. Some well-known precipitants of DKA include new-onset T1DM, insulin withdrawal and acute illness. In this report, we present a subject who presented with DKA as an initial manifestation of Cushing’s disease secondary to ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted with fever, cough, left-sided chest pain, shortness of breath and hemoptysis. She reported amenorrhea of one-year duration. She was a chronic smoker for over 20 years. Patient was unable to provide a detailed history at the time of admission due to acuteness of her illness and respiratory distress. On physical examination, patient was alert, oriented and in moderate respiratory distress with Kussmaul breathing, temperature: 102 F; respiratory rate: 20/min; pulse: 110/min and blood pressure: 148/98 mmHg; body weight: 158 lbs as well as round flushed face with acne, hirsutism and dark purple striae of the abdominal wall (Fig. 1). Lung examination revealed bronchial breath sounds with crackles in the lower left field. Heart evaluation showed normal heart sounds with tachycardia without a murmur, and neurological assessment was unremarkable. Investigation Complete blood count was significant for WBC 21.600/mL with segmented neutrophils 69%. Serum chemistries showed sodium: 134 mM/L (normal: 135–146); potassium: 3.5 mM/L (normal: 3.5–5.3); chloride: 78 mM/L (normal: 98–110); HCO3−: <10 mM/L (normal: 20–31); anion gap: 50 mM/L (normal: 8–16); se Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Attack Risk And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes, Heart Attack Risk And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

People with diabetes have heart attacks or strokes more than twice as often as people without diabetes. 1 In addition, two out of three people with diabetes eventually die from these conditions, according to the American Diabetes Association. 2 Heart Disease Risk Factors According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if you have diabetes your risk of death by heart disease may be two to four times greater than for someone who doesn’t have diabetes. 3 The American Heart Association cites the same statistic, adding that at least 68 percent of people with diabetes who are older than 65 years of age die of heart disease. 4 Other risks for heart disease include high LDL cholesterol levels, high blood pressure (hypertension), and high triglyceride levels, according to the CDC. 5 Many people with diabetes also have a combination of other risk factors: low HDL cholesterol, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. 6 High Blood Sugar and Heart Disease Over time, high blood sugar may lead to increased fatty deposits on blood vessel walls, affecting blood flow and increasing the chance of blood vessel hardening. This is according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 7 Heart Attack Warning Signs The risk of having a heart attack is higher for diabetics and diabetics who have already suffered one heart attack have an even greater risk of having a second. NIDDK mentions some important warning signs that may indicate you might be experiencing a heart attack, such as chest, arm, jaw, neck, back or stomach pain. 8 Other possible symptoms of a heart attack include shortness of breath, nausea, sweating and lightheadedness. 9 Reducing Your Risks as a Diabetic If you have diabetes, th Continue reading >>

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

Property consultant Michael Green was adamant that his type 2 diabetes was nothing to worry about. 'It's the non-serious type,' he'd say dismissively. Michael's laid-back attitude is in some ways understandable. The father-of-one had never suffered any obvious ill-effects from the condition he'd lived with for 28 years, and he'd been diagnosed not as a result of any troubling symptoms, but by chance following a routine blood test. Compared to a family friend who had type 1 diabetes, he was lucky, he insisted. At least he didn't have to monitor his blood sugar levels every few hours, and inject insulin. Then one night, two years ago, he went to sleep and never woke up. At just 53, he'd suffered a 'silent heart attack' - a little-known complication of diabetes. A silent attack is almost symptomless and occurs without any of the chest pain normally associated with a heart attack. Yet they can be just as dangerous - if not more so - as a normal heart attack. They're also surprisingly common. It is estimated that around a quarter of the 175,000 heart attacks in the UK each year are the silent type - and people with diabetes are at greatest risk. This is because the nerve damage linked to their condition can prevent warning signals being transmitted in the usual way. This, in turn, can lead to a delay in seeking treatment and result in damage to the blood vessels and heart muscle that make the heart attack more lethal. Heart attacks occur when there is a blockage in the artery supplying blood to the heart. Normally, this is as a result of a fatty plaque breaking off from the artery wall, triggering a blood clot. When the blood supply to the heart is reduced, the body produces chemicals that affect nerves and trigger pain. Often, people describe the pain of a heart attack as a Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of mortality in childhood diabetes.[1]The primary cause of DKA is absolute or relative insulin deficiency: Absolute - eg, previously undiagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus or a patient with known type 1 diabetes who does not take their insulin. Relative - stress causes a rise in counter-regulatory hormones with relative insulin deficiency. DKA can be fatal The usual causes of death are: Cerebral oedema - associated with 25% mortality (see 'Cerebral odedema', below). Hypokalaemia - which is preventable with good monitoring. Aspiration pneumonia - thus, use of a nasogastric tube in the semi-conscious or unconscious is advised. Deficiency of insulin. Rise in counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, and catecholamines. Thus, inappropriate gluconeogenesis and liver glycogenolysis occur compounding the hyperglycaemia, which causes hyperosmolarity and ensuing polyuria, dehydration and loss of electrolytes. Accelerated catabolism from lipolysis of adipose tissue leads to increased free fatty acid circulation, which on hepatic oxidation produces the ketone bodies (acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) that cause the metabolic acidosis. A vicious circle is usually set up as vomiting usually occurs compounding the stress and dehydration; the cycle can only be broken by providing insulin and fluids; otherwise, severe acidosis occurs and can be fatal. Biochemical criteria The biochemical criteria required for a diagnosis of DKA to be made are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Myocardial Necrosis

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Acute Myocardial Necrosis

We describe a case of a 28-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital with severe diabetic ketoacidosis. She was known to have had type 1 diabetes for 10 years. During the previous 2 days, she had gone to a party, drank a considerable amount of alcohol, and did not administer her regular dose of insulin. On admission, she was semicomatose and tachypnoic, her blood pressure was 90/70 mmHg, and her heart rate 80 bpm. Laboratory tests showed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.92, bicarbonate 2.2 mmol/l, pCO2 1.49 kPa), very high blood glucose (75 mmol/l), hyponatremia (104.3 mmol/l), hypochloremia (70 mmol/l), severe hyperkalemia (8.5 mmol/l), and elevated blood urea (20.3 mmol/l) and creatinine (317 μmol/l). Blood ethanol level was 0.2 g/l. Screening for possible intoxication, including cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines, was negative. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed sinus rhythm with wide QRS complexes and diffuse nonspecific ST changes. The patient was treated with continuous intravenous saline and insulin infusion. After 12 h, her blood glucose decreased to 17.5 mmol/l (pH 7.23, bicarbonate 12.0 mmol/l, potassium 5.12 mmol/l, and sodium 127.8 mmol/l). Blood urea decreased to 14.6 mmol/l and creatinine to 154 μmol/l. ECG was also normalized. After 36 h, the patient experienced transient stabbing chest pain, which was partially relieved by the change of body position. Complex ventricular arrhythmias, including short runs of ventricular tachycardia, were noticed. Repeat ECG revealed mild ST elevations in leads II, III, and aVF with negative T-waves in leads V2–V4. Echocardiography revealed somewhat depressed left ventricular systolic function (LVEF 45%) with hypokinesis of the posterior and inferior walls. Serum troponin I increased to 343 ng/ml (normal value ≤0.4 Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Pain On The Right Side Under The Bottom Rib?

What Are The Causes Of Pain On The Right Side Under The Bottom Rib?

According to the Merck Manuals Online Medical Library, pain that manifests in the abdomen, including the right upper abdominal quadrant, can be caused by the viscera or abdominal organs, structures outside the abdomen or the parietal peritoneum -- the membrane that lines the abdominal wall. When it arises suddenly, right upper abdominal pain may indicate a serious underlying health concern. Video of the Day Acute cholecystitis can cause pain in the right upper abdomen, below the bottom rib. According to MedlinePlus, acute cholecystitis is a sudden inflammation of the gallbladder that is characterized by extreme abdominal pain. Most cases of acute cholecystitis -- approximately 90 percent -- are caused by gallstones that trap bile, an important digestive aid, inside the gallbladder. Other possible causes of acute cholecystitis include gallbladder tumors and serious illness. Common signs and symptoms associated with acute cholecystitis include sharp, cramping or dull pain in the right upper abdominal quadrant, the sensation of abdominal fullness, clay-colored stools, fever, nausea, vomiting and jaundice -- yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes. MedlinePlus states that gallstones are more common in women than men. Typhoid fever can cause pain on the right side of the abdomen, under the bottom rib. MayoClinic.com states that typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi bacteria. Although typhoid fever is uncommon in industrialized nations, it is still a significant health threat in developing countries. Typhoid fever can spread in one of two possible ways: via contaminated food and water or through close contact with an infected individual. Typhoid fever-related symptoms tend to develop gradually. Common signs and symptoms associated with typhoid fever include abd Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition caused by a build-up of waste products called ketones in the blood. It occurs in people with diabetes mellitus when they have no, or very low levels of, insulin. DKA mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, but it can also occur in some people with type 2 diabetes and pregnant women with gestational diabetes. Causes Glucose is an essential energy source for the body's cells. When food containing carbohydrates is eaten, it is broken down into glucose that travels around the body in the blood, to be absorbed by cells that use it for energy. Insulin works to help glucose pass into cells. Without insulin, the cells cannot absorb glucose to use for energy. This leads to a series of changes in metabolism that can affect the whole body. The liver attempts to compensate for the lack of energy in the cells by producing more glucose, leading to increased levels of glucose in the blood, also known as hyperglycaemia. The body switches to burning its stores of fat instead of glucose to produce energy. This leads to a build-up of acidic waste products called ketones in the blood and urine. This is known as ketoacidosis, and it can cause heart rhythm abnormalities, breathing changes and abdominal pain. The kidneys try to remove some of the excess glucose and ketones. However, this requires taking large amounts of fluid from the body, which leads to dehydration. This can cause: Increased concentration of ketones in the blood, worsening the ketoacidosis; Loss of electrolytes such as potassium and salt that are vital for the normal function of the body's cells, and; Signs and symptoms Symptoms of DKA can develop over the course of hours. They can include: Increased thirst; Increased frequency Continue reading >>

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

SESSION TITLE: Critical Care Student/Resident Case Report Posters I SESSION TYPE: Student/Resident Case Report Poster INTRODUCTION: A 47 year-old woman with type 1 diabetes presented with euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) that initially went undiagnosed. Recognition and treatment with insulin resulted in rapid resolution of her clinical condition. CASE PRESENTATION: A 47 year-old woman presented to our hospital with four days of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, lethargy and malaise. She had a history of type 1 diabetes mellitus managed with an insulin pump. Her blood pressure was 88/51. She was disoriented with a diffusely tender but soft abdomen. Laboratory studies revealed blood glucose of 109 mg/dL, bicarbonate of 15 mmol/L, anion gap of 27 mmol/L, lactic acid of 2.4 mmol/L, and a bandemia of 11%. Rapid flu test was positive. She was admitted to the intensive care unit, resuscitated with intravenous fluid, and started on oseltamivir, cefepime and vancomycin. Hemodialysis was initiated soon thereafter. The patient received no insulin due to her euglycemia. Influenza A was detected by PCR on the second hospital day and antibiotics were discontinued. Her gastrointestinal symptoms improved but her mental status remained poor. Furthermore, while her lactate normalized and blood glucose remained under 120 mg/d, her anion gap persisted at 23-36 mmol/L and her bicarbonate remained low at 15-17 mmol/L. Beta hydroxybutyrate was found to be 4.88 mmol/L. An insulin infusion was started, along with dextrose 5% in water, and her mental status rapidly improved as her acidemia and anion gap normalized. DISCUSSION: Euglycemic DKA is a rare condition that can easily go undiagnosed. It has been previously described in the context of critical illness.1 The pathoge Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition that occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when your body has trouble using the insulin that it does make. About 1 in 400 young people have this condition. What is insulin? Why is it important? Insulin is a hormone made by a gland called the pancreas. The pancreas is located behind the stomach. Whenever you eat food, your body digests the food (breaks it down) into smaller parts: vitamins, minerals, sugar (called “glucose”), fat, and protein. Your body then uses glucose for energy. Glucose is the body’s major source of energy. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose enter the cells of your body so it can be used as energy. If your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or if your body has difficulty using the insulin that it makes, the glucose from your food does not get changed into energy. Instead, the glucose stays in your blood, causing your blood glucose (also called “blood sugar”) to rise. Why is high blood sugar a problem? High blood sugar is a problem because it can cause serious damage to the body. Some of the most serious, long term problems are loss of vision, kidney problems, heart problems, damage to circulation and stroke. This kind of damage happens slowly over many years and can be delayed or prevented if you take good care of your diabetes. There are also short-term problems that come from high blood sugar. Some common short term-problems (caused from high blood sugar) are: Being thirsty Having to urinate (pee) more often Feeling irritable or exhausted Weight loss If your blood sugar gets too high due to not having enough insulin, you can experience a very serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Signs of ketoacidosis are: Rapid deep breathing Stomach pain or chest pain and/or Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA: My eight-year-old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes last fall. His sugars have been running high off and on for the past two weeks. I spoke with his diabetes nurse last week and she recommended he be given an extra unit of NPH insulin in the morning since his late morning and lunchtime numbers have been high (his highest was 498 mg/dl [27.7 mmol/L]). He was okay for a few days after his changed dose but now is running high once again. Just last night, he started complaining of chest pain. He has never complained of this before. I got him calmed down and got him to sleep, but the pain woke him up a few hours later. I thought may be it was indigestion so, at first, I wasn't to worried. But, today, he has been complaining of this pain as well. I am concerned because he also has been having these high blood sugars. Do you have any idea what might be causing this? Answer: There are many, many, many causes of chest pain in children and almost all have nothing to do with diabetes. To get a better sense of the potential seriousness of this discomfort, your doctor will want to know the quality of the pain (e.g., "stabbing like a knife" or "pressure" or "pinprick," etc.), the duration of the pain ("how long it lasts before it goes away"), what brings it on, what gives relief, if there is a change in breathing pattern or development of cough, whether it interferes with eating, etc. Strictly from a diabetes perspective, the presence of ketones can certainly lead to chest pain. As you should know, higher glucoses can lead to the development of ketones and can progress to the serious "diabetic ketoacidosis" (DKA). This is why blood or urine ketones should be checked when the blood glucose is over 240 mg/dl [13.3 mmol/L] or so (alth Continue reading >>

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