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Can Ketoacidosis Cause Brain Damage

Neurological Consequences Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Initial Presentation Of Type 1 Diabetes In A Prospective Cohort Study Of Children

Neurological Consequences Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Initial Presentation Of Type 1 Diabetes In A Prospective Cohort Study Of Children

Go to: To investigate the impact of new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during childhood on brain morphology and function. Patients aged 6–18 years with and without DKA at diagnosis were studied at four time points: <48 h, 5 days, 28 days, and 6 months postdiagnosis. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy with cognitive assessment at each time point. Relationships between clinical characteristics at presentation and MRI and neurologic outcomes were examined using multiple linear regression, repeated-measures, and ANCOVA analyses. Thirty-six DKA and 59 non-DKA patients were recruited between 2004 and 2009. With DKA, cerebral white matter showed the greatest alterations with increased total white matter volume and higher mean diffusivity in the frontal, temporal, and parietal white matter. Total white matter volume decreased over the first 6 months. For gray matter in DKA patients, total volume was lower at baseline and increased over 6 months. Lower levels of N-acetylaspartate were noted at baseline in the frontal gray matter and basal ganglia. Mental state scores were lower at baseline and at 5 days. Of note, although changes in total and regional brain volumes over the first 5 days resolved, they were associated with poorer delayed memory recall and poorer sustained and divided attention at 6 months. Age at time of presentation and pH level were predictors of neuroimaging and functional outcomes. DKA at type 1 diabetes diagnosis results in morphologic and functional brain changes. These changes are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes in the medium term. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis May Come With Brain Changes In Kids, Including Memory Loss

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis May Come With Brain Changes In Kids, Including Memory Loss

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of the death in the United States. A new study reveals another disturbing detail. Researchers found that type 1 diabetes in children can cause brain loss, affecting memory and attention cognition. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a harmful complication of Type 1 Diabetes that can gradually alter brain matter in newly diagnosed children. "Children and adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with diabetic ketoacidosis have evidence of brain gray matter shrinkage and white matter swelling," the study's lead author Dr. Fergus Cameron, head of diabetes services at Royal Children's Hospital in Victoria, Australia, told HealthDay. The recent study includes 36 children and teens with DKA and 59 without it. MRIs were taken over the course of six months. Those with DKA experienced a decrease in gray matter volume along with swelling of white matter. There was also evidence of memory loss and reduced sustained and divided attention. Symptoms tended to develop over time, raising a big concern for parents who might not notice any differences in their child right away. "Any decrement in attention or memory in children is a concern as children are acquiring new knowledge and learning new skills all the time," Cameron said. Cameron and his team found that 20 to 30 percent of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes had DKA. According to the CDC, from 2002 to 2003, 15,000 youth in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. "DKA still kills people, so we need to do better. We need better tools. And we need to educate doctors more on the symptoms of type 1 diabetes," Cameron said. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation reports that type 1 diabetes is on the rise. Each year, 30,000 U.S. adults and children are diagn Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Can Vaccines Cause Permanent Brain Damage?

Can Vaccines Cause Permanent Brain Damage?

Autism is not brain damage or seizures. It is autism. Anything that causes a fever can cause seizures. This is called, “febrile seizure” and it is not unusual for children who get fevers due to any reason, such as a virus, a strep throat, or a fever that comes from a vaccine. Febrile seizures don’t actually cause any long term harms. Brain damage or GBS type of illness can also occur from the naturally occurring infections. Take for example…measles. The MMR vaccine. Can it cause encephalitis? Yes, on the rate of around 1 in 2 million. However, what happens when kids get NATURAL measles? As many as one out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children. About one child out of every 1,000 who get measles will develop encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can lead to convulsions and can leave the child deaf or with intellectual disability. For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die from it. So, is it better for 1 out of a couple million to get brain damage, or is it better for one or two in every thousand to die? Your call. ONE THOUSAND TIMES more risk from letting kids go unvaccinated. You do the math. How many children are in your child’s school? Maybe 1,000? Okay, imagine that 2 of them die from measles, and 1 of them is deaf from the infection, and 50 of them have pneumonia. Or….none of them have any problems, because there are not 2 million children at the school, so the risk of “brain damage” from the shot is so very very rare that 1,000 schools each with 1,000 students would have to be counted in order to have one student with a bad effect. Like I said, go ahead and choose which numbers you would rather have. Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Cognitive Function In Diabetes

Cognitive Function In Diabetes

Cognitive deficits, that is clinically relevant problems in cognitive performance, are commonly observed in people with both type 1 (T1DM) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Both diseases are related specifically to slowing of mental processing speed, psycho-motor speed, executive functions and attention. In T2DM learning and memory problems are often noted but less so in T1DM. Evidence for changes in brain structure and functioning accompanying cognitive dysfunction is accumulating. Chronic hyperglycaemia and associated microvascular disease appear to be the most important determinants of cognitive decrements in diabetes. Hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia Hypoglycaemia can lead to unconsciousness, seizure, coma or even death. Mild to moderate levels of hypoglycaemia commonly affect higher-order cognitive functions. Patients may experience mood changes and difficulty with memory, planning, attention and concentration [1]. Mental speed rapidly decreases, while accuracy remains relatively unaffected. With severe hypoglycaemia, all cognitive functions may be affected, seriously decreasing a patient’s mental capabilities. Whereas blood glucose can be quickly restored, cognitive dysfunction may take up to 4 hours or more to recover fully. Acute effects of hypoglycaemia on brain structure in diabetes are rarely reported and pre-clinical data suggest that brain damage after hypoglycaemia may be the result of reactive hyperglycaemia through overcompensation of counter-regulatory actions. In neonates without diabetes, hypoglycaemia is a common cause of brain damage, delayed development and death. The acute effect of hyperglycaemia on cognition seems relatively mild, contrary to the long-term effects, and may be associated with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), usually observed in ch Continue reading >>

Dka: Raising Awareness To Save Lives

Dka: Raising Awareness To Save Lives

WRITTEN BY: Sarah Lucas Recently there have been countless stories of US children lost to a disease neither their parents nor doctors even knew they had developed – Type 1 diabetes. Their early symptoms were missed or easily excused away and their more pronounced symptoms were mistaken for the flu or strep throat. By the time the true nature of their disease was discovered, their bodies, without the ability to produce insulin, had begun to burn fat for energy. The resulting molecules, ketones, essentially built up and poisoned their bodies, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. For children like Kycie Jai Terry (5), David M Brown II (4), Angela Elizabeth Robinson (11) whose blood sugar at diagnosis was 1600, they never had the opportunity to “live beyond.” Their Type 1 diagnosis, like thousands of others, came too late. Their lives were cut short and their families devastated. An estimated 41% of individuals are in DKA at the diagnosis in the US, and that number varies in countries around the globe, from 12% to an astounding 80%. DKA costs families tens of millions of dollars each year in emergency care, carries the risk of permanent organ and brain damage, and is the leading cause of mortality in childhood diabetes. The majority of this devastation could be avoided. There is a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive (on average 24¢) way to safeguard lives and protect futures. A simple urine test or a finger prick for one drop of blood is all that is needed, but people have to know the warning signs and have to advocate for testing. When my daughter Mary was diagnosed, I was frightened for her and for our family – but a diagnosis meant that we were able to get her treatment, it meant that she was coming home from the hospital and that we would adjust, carry on an Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (though rare, it can occur in people with type 2 diabetes) that occurs when the body produces high levels of ketones due to lack of insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include Risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis are type 1 diabetes, and missing insulin doses frequently, or being exposed to a stressor requiring higher insulin doses (infection, etc). Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar (glucose) level, elevated blood ketones and acidity of the blood (acidosis). The treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin, fluids and electrolyte therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be prevented by taking insulin as prescribed and monitoring glucose and ketone levels. The prognosis for a person with diabetic ketoacidosis depends on the severity of the disease and the other underlying medical conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the cells in our body do not receive the sugar (glucose) they need for energy. This happens while there is plenty of glucose in the bloodstream, but not enough insulin to help convert glucose for use in the cells. The body recognizes this and starts breaking down muscle and fat for energy. This breakdown produces ketones (also called fatty acids), which cause an imbalance in our electrolyte system leading to the ketoacidosis (a metabolic acidosis). The sugar that cannot be used because of the lack of insulin stays in the bloodstream (rather than going into the cell and provide energy). The kidneys filter some of the glucose (suga Continue reading >>

Can Prolonged Shallow Breathing Cause Any Brain Damage?

Can Prolonged Shallow Breathing Cause Any Brain Damage?

If shallow breathing translates into faster and more frequent breathing cycles, it can cause brain damage in the long term. Breathing more frequently than the required physiological demand, may induce a state called respiratory alkalosis. It means an increased blood pH, caused by excessive amounts of carbon dioxide being expelled. Carbon dioxide is one of the metabolites of energy production in cells. It is an acid, so its concentration in blood affects blood’s pH. The respiratory system, alongside the kidneys, plays an important role managing blood’s pH, by balancing CO2 levels. Blood’s pH values normally ranges from 7,35 to 7,45. A excessive increase of CO2 excretion may cause those values to raise above 7,45. In order to maintain or pH inside that narrow interval, we have many compensating mechanisms (such as the excretion of bicarbonate by the kidneys), but in some situations, when the changes are too abrupt or harsh, those mechanisms will fail, resulting in pHs higher than 7,45, and alkalosis. The common causes of Respiratory alkalosis are: Panic attacks Severe anxiety Some drugs Fever Infection Some pulmonary diseases such as severe asthma or COPD Its symptoms may range from mild to severe, and can even result in comma or death. Some examples are: Dizziness Confusion Numbness or muscle spasms Palpitations Shortness of breath Continue reading >>

Does Marijuana Damage The Brain?

Does Marijuana Damage The Brain?

Seems most answers here are taking the “yes” position and then go on to detail an obvious bias against cannabis or assemble informal research to support their position. Many statements about potency or general dangers are way off the mark. For one, potency of cannabis products has always had a wide range — certainly you could argue that in modern times we have easier access to more potent strains and products, therefore, consumers are now much more discerning. Few modern users are willing to put up with low potency products with seeds and stems. In some ways, more potent products makes for a safer product — less plant matter is smoked reducing carcinogens. On the other hand, assuming cannabis is smoked reveals an inherent bias against it or otherwise a lack of familiarity with a very wide range of alternative delivery mechanisms such as vapor, tincture, or edibles. And yet, I am fully aware that easier access to potent products means higher doses are possible over long periods of time — this is a blessing for people with serious chronic medical conditions, but also potentially a curse for younger recreational users. Many experts connect our current opiate epidemic to the progression from raw opium from poppies to more and more processed, refined, potent and eventually synthetic version of opiate compounds. I actually fear that the “medicalization” of cannabis may have more negative consequences than the more natural whole plant versions or plant-based extracts (hash, oils) that have been in use for literally thousands of years. Bottom line — due to the nearly global prohibition against cannabis lead by modern US Federal policies, we really don’t know. As a neuro-academic with long interest in this, some publishing on this topic, and many direct experie Continue reading >>

How Long Does Diabetic Coma Last And How Is It Treated?

How Long Does Diabetic Coma Last And How Is It Treated?

When immediately attended and given the right treatment, the diabetic patient can be quickly wakened up from the diabetic coma. Late attention to diabetic coma might take more glucose to be given to the person for better healing. The diabetic coma is connected to the metabolic abnormalities which forces the diabetic patient to the coma. If the diabetic patient stays in the coma for longer periods of time or if the patient is unattended for long time, permanant brain damage may take place or in rare instances it may lead to death of the patient. What is the Prognosis or Outlook for Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma can be fatal. Late attention may prolong the period of treatment. A person who has been treated for long for diabetic coma is recorded to experience a brain damage. This is a dire situation but can be avoided by taking precautionary measures. Remain alert and aware to save yourself from diabetic coma. Manage your diabetic syndromes effectively to save your life. Even after the sugar level is normalized in a person, he or she will still experience nervous disorders like seizures or talking problems. Problems still persists even after recovering from diabetic coma. The recovery time cannot be predicted and depends on individual case. When immediately attended and given glucose biscuits, a person can be quickly wakened up. Late attention might take more glucose to be given to the person for better healing. Consult your doctor and take necessary guidelines on how to prevent any incident of diabetic coma or any other complexities if you are diabetic. Your doctor may prescribe you tests to determine the exact "dos and don'ts" to you on how to manage diabetes. Diabetic coma is caused by three major reasons: Severe hypolgycemia i.e., low blood sugar level Diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Understanding And Preventing Diabetic Coma

Understanding And Preventing Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a serious, potentially life-threatening complication associated with diabetes. A diabetic coma causes unconsciousness that you cannot awaken from without medical care. Most cases of diabetic coma occur in people with type 1 diabetes. But people with other types of diabetes are also at risk. If you have diabetes, it’s important to learn about diabetic coma, including its causes and symptoms. Doing so will help prevent this dangerous complication and help you get the treatment you need right away. Diabetic coma can occur when blood sugar levels are out of control. It has three main causes: Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs when you don’t have enough glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Low sugar levels can happen to anyone from time to time. If you treat mild to moderate hypoglycemia immediately, it usually resolves without progressing to severe hypoglycemia. People on insulin have the highest risk, though people who take oral diabetes medications that increase insulin levels in the body may also be at risk. Untreated or unresponsive low blood sugars can lead to severe hypoglycemia. This is the most common cause of diabetic coma. You should take extra precautions if you have difficulty detecting symptoms of hypoglycemia. This diabetes phenomenon is known as hypoglycemia unawareness. DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when your body lacks insulin and uses fat instead of glucose for energy. Ketone bodies accumulate in the bloodstream. DKA occurs in both forms of diabetes, but it’s more common in type 1. Ketone bodies may be detected with special blood glucose meters or with urine strips to check for DKA. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking for ketone bodies and DKA if your blood glucose is over 240 mg/dl. When left untreated, DKA can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the hallmark of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. DKA is an emergency condition caused by a disturbance in your body’s metabolism. Extremely high blood glucose levels, along with a severe lack of insulin, result in the breakdown of body fat for energy and an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine. Statistics on Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in between 16%-80% of children presenting with newly diagnosed diabetes. It remains the most common cause of death for young type 1 diabetes sufferers. Before the discovery of insulin, mortality rates were up to 100%. Today, the mortality has fallen to around 2% due to early identification and treatment. Death is usually caused by cerebral oedema (swelling of the brain). DKA is most common in type 1 diabetes sufferers but may also occur in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the latter group usually has at least some functioning insulin so suffer from another disorder called hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma (HONK). DKA tends to occur in individuals younger than 19 years, the more brittle of type 1 diabetic patients. However, DKA can affect diabetic patients of any age or sex. Risk Factors for Diabetic Ketoacidosis People with diabetes lack sufficient insulin, a hormone the body uses to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar) for energy. Therefore in diabetic patients glucose is not available as a fuel, so the body turns to fat stores for energy. However when fats are broken down they produce byproducts called ketones which build up in the blood and can be damaging to the body. In particular, accumulated ketones can “spill” over into the urine and make the blood become more acidic than body tissues (ketoacidosis). Blood gl Continue reading >>

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