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Can Ketoacidosis Be Reversed

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

What Is The Longest A Diabetic Can Go Without An Injection?

What Is The Longest A Diabetic Can Go Without An Injection?

Type one diabetes at the most two to three days, by that time they would be severely ketotic, risking a sometimes fatal diabetes hyperglycemic ketoacidotic coma. For type 2 diabetes mostly that can be for months, even years, like we see in those war torn areas. My erstwhile partner, when I met him already a senior physician, told me that the experience during WW II in The Netherlands, those mostly type 2 diabetics who couldn’t get insulin didn’t die from not having insulin (which at the end was air-dropped by the British into German occupied territories), in fact did quite well with their blood sugars, unfortunately for a very sad reason: the Dutch famine of 1944–45 - Wikipedia costing about 18,000 people their lives. Of course not having their diabetes well controlled would cause them to develop a lot more complications so would shorten their lifespan appreciably. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis in cats at a glance Ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes in which ketones and blood sugar levels build up in the body due to insufficient levels of insulin which is required to move glucose into the cells for energy. As a result, the body uses fat as an alternate energy source which produces ketones causing the blood to become too acidic. Common causes include uncontrolled diabetes, missed or insufficient insulin, surgery, infection, stress and obesity. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include increased urination and thirst, dehydration, nausea, diarrhea, confusion, rapid breathing which may later change to laboured breathing. What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes characterised by metabolic acidosis (increased acids in the blood), hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and ketonuria (ketones in the urine). It is caused by a lack of or insufficient amounts of insulin which is required to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells to be used for energy. When this occurs, the body begins to search for alternate sources of energy and begins to break down fat. When fat is broken down (metabolised) into fatty acids, waste products known as ketones (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released from the liver and accumulate in the bloodstream (known as ketonemia). This causes the blood to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). As well as metabolic acidosis, ketones also cause central nervous depression.The body will try to get rid of the ketones by excreting them out of the body via the urine, increased urine output leads to dehydration, making the problem worse. Meanwhile, the unused glucose remains in the bloodstream, resulting in hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).Insulin Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Cerebral Edema In Infants?

How Can Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Cerebral Edema In Infants?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in and of itself does not cause cranial edema. What happens with DKA is the excess glucose in the blood changes the osmolarity of the blood, and causes fluid shift from intracelluar to extracellular. This causes the cells to shrink somewhat. Upon finding the patient in the DKA state, the teatment is insulin and IV fluids. Insulin and the hydration IV fluids reverse the DKA state, and also the osmolarity of the extracellular fluid, causing a fluid shift back into the cell. With the osmolarity reversed, the cells begin swelling—sometimes sometimes larger than before: this is what causes the edema in the cerebrum. This is particularly dangerous because the brain cells have nowhere to go, being encased within the skull. Even though infants have fontanelles and the skull has not fused solid, the extra fluid causes compression within the brain, which in turn can adversely affect the brain function. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Also see Pet Diabetes Wiki: Ketoacidosis A Ketone Primer by an FDMB user What are Ketones? Ketones or ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) are waste products of fatty acid breakdown in the body. This is the result of burning fat, rather than glucose, to fuel the body. The body tries to dispose of excess ketones as quickly as possible when they are present in the blood. The kidneys filter out ketones and excrete them into the urine. Should you care about ketones? YES! If they build up, they can lead to very serious energy problems in the body, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis, a true medical emergency. If the condition is not reversed and other systemic stresses are present, ketones may continue to rise and a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may occur. This condition can progress very quickly and cause severe illness. It is potentially fatal even when treated. Recognition of DKA and rapid treatment by your veterinarian can save your cat's life. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Drinking excessive amounts of water OR no water Excessive urination Diminished activity Not eating for over 12 hours Vomiting Lethargy and depression Weakness Breathing very fast Dehydration Ketone odor on breath (smells like nail-polish remover or fruit) Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus Inadequate insulin dosing or production Infection Concurrent diseas that stresses the animal Estrus Medication noncompliance Lethargy and depression Stress Surgery Idiopathic (unknown causes) Risk Factors for DKA Any condition that causes an insulin deficiency History of corticosteroid or beta-blocker administration Diagnosis Laboratory tests performed by your vet are necessary for diagnosis. Depending on how sick your c Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition characterized by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), low insulin, and the presence of moderate to large amounts of ketones in the blood. It's a medical emergency that requires treatment in a hospital. If not treated in a timely fashion, ketoacidosis can lead to coma and death. While diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA) is much more common among people with type 1 diabetes, it can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, so ketone monitoring is something everyone with diabetes should understand. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms Signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis include: Thirst or a very dry mouth Frequent urination Fatigue and weakness Nausea Vomiting Dry or flushed skin Abdominal pain Deep breathing A fruity breath odor What Are Ketones? Ketones, or ketone bodies, are acidic byproducts of fat metabolism. It's normal for everyone to have a small amount of ketones in the bloodstream, and after a fast of 12 to16 hours, there may be detectable amounts in the urine. As is the case with glucose, if blood levels of ketones get too high, they spill over into the urine. An elevated level of ketones in the blood is known as ketosis. People who follow low-carbohydrate diets often speak of ketosis as a desirable state — it's evidence that their bodies are burning fat, not carbohydrate. But the level of ketosis that results from low carbohydrate consumption isn't harmful and is much lower than the level seen in diabetic ketoacidosis. When Should Ketones Be Monitored? Ketone monitoring is less of a concern for people with type 2 diabetes than for those with type 1 diabetes. This is because most people with type 2 diabetes still make some of their own insulin, making diabetic ketoacidosis less likely to develop. Nonetheless, people with type 2 d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

One of the most effective ways to tackle type 2 diabetes is to lose weight, and it seems that dramatic weight loss may be particularly beneficial for blood-sugar levels. This surprising effect was first seen in patients who had undergone weight-loss (bariatric) surgery. As well as losing weight, many also reversed their diabetes. We will look at surgery on the next page, but there may be ways to replicate these benefits without major surgery — the answer may be as simple as a drastic, short-term diet. This is very much cutting-edge thinking and is the brainchild of Professor Roy Taylor, director of Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre at Newcastle University. Inspired by the diabetes-reversing effects of bariatric surgery, he decided to investigate the impact of a short-term, low-calorie diet on type 2 diabetes, using regular MRI scans to record exactly what was going on in the body. What he found could help to transform the health of many people with type 2 diabetes, even those who have had it for years. In a study published in 2011, he took 11 people with newly diagnosed type 2 (defined as being diagnosed in the previous four years) and gave them liquid diet formula. This provided 600 calories and was formulated so they received the right amount of nutrients. They also had around 200 calories of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli and spinach — these provided fibre usually obtained from carbs, which were excluded from the diet. After a week, MRI scans showed the fat around their livers had dropped by 30 per cent; furthermore, their blood-sugar levels were normal. At the end of the eight-week trial, fat levels in the pancreas had also plummeted and they were producing insulin again. Participants also lost an average of 2st 5lb (15kg). At a follow-up scan three m Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Emergency Department And Hospital: Acute Care Of Diabetes Patients

Diabetes In The Emergency Department And Hospital: Acute Care Of Diabetes Patients

Go to: Hyperglycemic Crisis: DKA and HHS Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) accounts for more than 110,000 hospitalizations annually in the United States, with mortality ranging from 2 to 10%4–6. Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is much less common but confers a much greater mortality7. Patients with DKA classically present with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased total body ketone concentration. On the other hand, HHS is defined by altered mental status caused by hyperosmolality, profound dehydration, and severe hyperglycemia without significant ketoacidosis6,8. Initial evaluation In the Emergency Department, the primary goals are rapid evaluation and stabilization. All patients with severe hyperglycemia should immediately undergo assessment and stabilization of their airway and hemodynamic status, with consideration of administration of naloxone for all patients with altered mentation to reverse potential opiate overdose, and thiamine for all patients at risk for Wernicke’s encephalopathy. In cases requiring intubation, the paralytic succinylcholine should not be used if hyperkalemia is suspected as it may acutely further elevate potassium. Immediate assessment should also include placing patients on oxygen, measure O2 saturation and cardiac monitoring as well as obtaining vital signs, a fingerstick glucose, intravenous (IV) access, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram to evaluate for arrhythmias and signs of hyper-and hypokalemia. Emergency Department evaluation should include a thorough clinical history and physical examination, as well as a venous blood gas,9,10 complete blood count, basic metabolic panel, and urinalysis; a urine pregnancy test must be sent for all women with childbearing potential. An important goal of this evaluation is id Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma found in people with diabetes mellitus. It is a medical emergency.[1] Three different types of diabetic coma are identified: Severe low blood sugar in a diabetic person Diabetic ketoacidosis (usually type 1) advanced enough to result in unconsciousness from a combination of a severely increased blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (usually type 2) in which an extremely high blood sugar level and dehydration alone are sufficient to cause unconsciousness. In most medical contexts, the term diabetic coma refers to the diagnostical dilemma posed when a physician is confronted with an unconscious patient about whom nothing is known except that they have diabetes. An example might be a physician working in an emergency department who receives an unconscious patient wearing a medical identification tag saying DIABETIC. Paramedics may be called to rescue an unconscious person by friends who identify them as diabetic. Brief descriptions of the three major conditions are followed by a discussion of the diagnostic process used to distinguish among them, as well as a few other conditions which must be considered. An estimated 2 to 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from at least one episode of diabetic coma in their lifetimes as a result of severe hypoglycemia. Types[edit] Severe hypoglycemia[edit] People with type 1 diabetes mellitus who must take insulin in full replacement doses are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. It is usually mild enough to reverse by eating or drinking carbohydrates, but blood glucose occasionally can fall fast enough and low enough to produce unconsciousness before hypoglycemia can be recognized and reversed. Hypoglycemia can be severe enough to cause un Continue reading >>

How Do You Cure Type 2 Diabetes Naturally With Diet?

How Do You Cure Type 2 Diabetes Naturally With Diet?

I’m a specialist practitioner in obesity and diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed through diet. Absolutely. Firstly this is what is a normal insulin reaction looks like: Insulin is manufactured in the pancreas and secreted when your blood sugar levels rise. Blood sugar needs to be not too high and not too low. Insulin’s mechanism to remove sugar from blood is to put it into cells, like your muscles. If there is an excess after blood glucose has gone into cells it is then put in the liver and further excess becomes fat. What happens with type 2 When insulin is secreted the body’s cells have ‘‘receptors’ that accept the insulin’s key that then open the doors to the cell to let the glucose in. Sadly in type 2 the receptors become resistant to the insulin key. Therefore not enough energy gets into the cell. The body has a negative feedback system. Once the cells do not get enough energy a signal is sent back to the pancreas to manufacture even more insulin. This is a vicious cycle. Insulin keeps going up and resistance keeps getting worse. A drug, called metformin works by making cells receptive again but it has limitations and eventually other drugs are needed. This is not ideal; so how can we reverse this? Well quite simply really. The crux of this scenario is that it is the sugar spikes in the blood that are causing the high levels of insulin in the first place. Certain foods cause insulin to enter the system in a fast and high volume way and some foods hardly disturb insulin at all. The insulin index is similar to the GI system and by picking foods that cause little insulin response the type 2 diabetes begins to reverse. This is a snapshot. The lower the number the lower the insulin response Sadly many government guidelines are not beneficial and larg Continue reading >>

Can Olanzapine Make You Diabetic?

Can Olanzapine Make You Diabetic?

Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic that has been widely used because of its better clinical efficacy, superior activity against negative symptoms, lesser extra-pyramidal symptoms, and better tolerability profile compared to typical antipsychotics. Recently, a flurry of reports have stated that olanzapine is associated with high blood sugar levels in new onset or pre-existing diabetes mellitus and ketoacidosis, which may be reversible after discontinuation of olanzapine. The exact cause of glucose dysregulation by olanzapine is not clear. It has been hypothesized that 5-HT1 antagonism may decrease the responsiveness of the pancreatic beta cells, thus reducing the secretion of insulin and causing hyperglycemia. In vivo studies suggest that olanzapine impairs glycogen synthesis via inhibition of the classical insulin signaling cascade and this inhibitory effect may lead to the induction of insulin resistance in olanzapine-treated patients. Since olanzapine is becoming more and more popular as a first line agent in the treatment of psychosis as well as in mood disorders, proper guidelines have to be established for monitoring blood glucose levels and determination of risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Hence, it is very important for clinicians that all patients started on olanzapine require regular monitoring of their blood sugar levels. Clinicians should take at most precaution in pre-existing diabetic patients before starting olanzapine. If olanzapine is suspected to being a causal factor for hyperglycemia, we can reduce that risk by withdrawal of olanzapine or switching over to some other medicines without worsening the psychiatric condition of patient. India being a diabetes rich country; the author strongly suggests at least a baseline survey should be undertaken Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

GENERAL ketoacidosis is a high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to an excessive blood concentration of ketone bodies (keto-anions). ketone bodies (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released into the blood from the liver when hepatic lipid metabolism has changed to a state of increased ketogenesis. a relative or absolute insulin deficiency is present in all cases. CAUSES The three major types of ketosis are: (i) Starvation ketosis (ii) Alcoholic ketoacidosis (iii) Diabetic ketoacidosis STARVATION KETOSIS when hepatic glycogen stores are exhausted (eg after 12-24 hours of total fasting), the liver produces ketones to provide an energy substrate for peripheral tissues. ketoacidosis can appear after an overnight fast but it typically requires 3 to 14 days of starvation to reach maximal severity. typical keto-anion levels are only 1 to 2 mmol/l and this will usually not alter the anion gap. the acidosis even with quite prolonged fasting is only ever of mild to moderate severity with keto-anion levels up to a maximum of 3 to 5 mmol/l and plasma pH down to 7.3. ketone bodies also stimulate some insulin release from the islets. patients are usually not diabetic. ALCOHOLIC KETOSIS Presentation a chronic alcoholic who has a binge, then stops drinking and has little or no oral food intake for a few days (ethanol and fasting) volume depletion is common and this can result in increased levels of counter regulatory hormones (eg glucagon) levels of free fatty acids (FFA) can be high (eg up to 3.5mM) providing plenty of substrate for the altered hepatic lipid metabolism to produce plenty of ketoanions GI symptoms are common (eg nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, haematemesis, melaena) acidaemia may be severe (eg pH down to 7.0) plasma glucose may be depressed or normal or Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 1 Diabetes Develop Dka Without High Blood Sugar?

Can People With Type 1 Diabetes Develop Dka Without High Blood Sugar?

“Can people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA without high blood sugar?” DKA is short for diabetic ketoacidosis and is a life threatening condition. I’ve seen the question pop up a lot lately so I asked two endocrinologists to answer this question. Experts Weigh In Dr. Richard Steed, an endocrinologist from Georgia with 25 years of experience explained that, “Ketoacidosis will occur in anyone when insulin levels drop low enough. In people with diabetes, falling insulin levels will usually trigger a high sugar well before ketoacidosis starts, causing high blood sugar to typically go hand in hand with ketoacidosis.” Dr. Brad Eilerman, an endocrinologist from Kentucky explained that “Ketoacidosis occurs when the body over produces ketone bodies, typically in response to a lack of available glucose to use as intracellular fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the rationale for the lack of intracellular glucose is a relative lack of insulin. Typically, this is associated with a high serum glucose because glucose taken in or produced by the liver has nowhere to go. If the patient has had a prolonged period of fasting to the point of protein calorie malnutrition, there may not be calories in order to produce glucose from the liver. This can lead to ketosis by itself. When combines with a lack of insulin, it can cause ketoacidosis,” writes Dr. Eilerman. Caution With Alcohol Dr. Steed writes that, “under the right circumstances, ketoacidosis can occur even in people without diabetes. Perhaps the commonest situation is starvation plus alcohol intake. In this situation, the starvation causes the body’s store of glucose as glycogen to become depleted. Then the body must depend on gluconeognesis (making glucose from protein) to sustain normal blood sugar levels. Alcohol w Continue reading >>

Actrapid: Eight Steps For Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Actrapid: Eight Steps For Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life threatening condition that occurs when excessive amounts of ketones are released into the bloodstream as a result of the body breaking down lipids, instead of utilising glucose as the energy source. This process is known as gluconeogenesis and occurs when the body does not have sufficient insulin to allow the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream into the cells. It is observed primarily in people with type one diabetes (insulin dependent), but it can occur in type two diabetes (non-insulin dependent) under certain circumstances. To understand the symptoms of DKA and therefore how to manage it effectively, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of hyperglycaemia which is explained in the flowchart below: The further down this flowchart the patient gets, the more serious their symptoms become. For this reason, there are varying degrees of severity with DKA: Mild pH 7.25 – 7.30, bicarbonate decreased to 15–18 mmol/L, the person is alert Moderate pH 7.00 – 7.25, bicarbonate 10–15 mmol/L, drowsiness may be present Severe pH below 7.00, bicarbonate below 10 mmol/L, stupor or coma may occur A.C.T.R.A.P.I.D. To remember the principles involved in managing a patient with DKA, remember the acronym ACTRAPID. Airway, breathing, circulation Commence fluid resuscitation Treat potassium Replace insulin Acidosis management Prevent complications Information for patients Discharge Airway, Breathing, Circulation As Per Any Emergency DKA patients need to have their airway, breathing and circulation assessed immediately. A decreased level of consciousness may lead to an unprotected airway and compromised breathing. The osmotic diuresis can cause a significant loss of fluid, leading to severe dehydration and circulatory co Continue reading >>

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