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Can I Eat More Carbs If I Exercise Keto

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

In my previous post, How to Exercise on a Keto Diet, I outlined the some of the basic facts about exercise and the most common myths. In this and future posts, I'd like to focus on nutrition aspects of exercise. Foods containing carbs are not all evil and I'll explain when clean paleo-friendly carbs can be used even on a keto diet. Let's start by busting some of the most common myths... Carbs and Performance Do we need carbs for better performance? One of the most common myths is that low-carb eating will negatively affect your performance. This is down to studies that ignore keto-adaptation and only focus on the immediate effects of carb restriction. There is, indeed, a transitional period in which performance drop occurs but it only lasts for a few weeks. Once you get keto-adapted (usually 3-4 weeks), your body will switch from using glucose to using ketones and fatty acids as the main source of energy. This study performed on elite athletes shows that a keto diet does not affect strength performance. Eight athletes over a period of 30 days were fed virtually a zero carb diet and didn't experience any drop in performance. In fact, more and more studies are showing the beneficial effects of keto-adaptation. Even athletes that are doing very long cardio training or marathons can follow a keto diet. Timothy Allen Olson is just one of the many super athletes who have proven to be thriving almost purely on a diet that is best described as low-carb, keto and paleo. However, Timothy doesn't follow a standard ketogenic diet - he eats carbs strategically. Before or after his workouts he eats clean carbs such as sweet potatoes and fruits. He also uses glucose gels on training runs. Everyone is different and although some may thrive on a Standard Ketogenic Diet, others may benef Continue reading >>

No Energy To Workout? Eat More Butter!

No Energy To Workout? Eat More Butter!

Have you ever felt like you have no energy to workout? Maybe you start strong but can’t make it through to the end (that’s why you sign up for group classes, right?). Or maybe you just skip your workout entirely, too exhausted to even get out the door. If you think that food has something to do with it, you’re right. But, what you’ve read in magazines may have led you astray. See, they probably told you that you need more “quick” energy in the form of carbohydrates, like whole grains or fruit. Or maybe they suggested you carb-load the night before. Turns out this information is pretty outdated and there’s a whole ‘nother approach to this topic. If you are exercising to try to lose weight, embracing this alternative way of eating will help you drop the pounds fast. (I mean, really how many of us are exercising to gain weight…) Today I’m sharing an article written by Emily Jenkins, who has both a BS and MS in nutrition and will soon be starting her training to become a registered dietitian. Like me, she’s a bit of a nutrition science junkie. She reached out to me to help on some projects and when I heard about her research into sports nutrition and the effects of a ketogenic diet on athletic performance at Auburn University, I asked her to write about it! It takes far too long for research to get into practice, which may be why you haven’t heard of this way of eating yet. If you like BUTTER or BACON, you’ll be pretty happy after reading this. Emily breaks it all down for you below. Why You Have No Energy To Workout PICTURE THIS, it’s early in the morning and you’re getting ready for your routine workout. You’ve got your exercise gear on, positivity is coursing through your veins, you’re eager for the challenge that awaits. But wait, what Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Want to be a fat-burning machine without having to count calories? Here’s a few ideas on how to get into ketosis faster on a low carb diet. Do you want to look leaner for bikini season? Yoga pants starting to feel a little tighter? One way to burn fat fast is to go on a ketogenic diet. The physiological process of burning stored fat instead of sugar, can be achieved within a short amount of time after following a strict keto diet. It is possible to get there in a day. In fact, some people show you how to get into ketosis, this fat burning state, in 24 hours. Do you need to fast? Becoming keto adapted where the body burns fat rather than sugar isn’t as hard as you might think. And, you don’t have to starve yourself to get there quickly. The great news for those who want to know how to get into ketosis faster is, well … you don’t have to fast. Fasting has been used for thousands of years by virtually every religion and traditional society. There are some people who think that a complete fast (not just intermittent fasting) is a way to get into ketosis faster. But the great thing about following a ketogenic diet is that you can eat until your heart—er, stomach—is content. You just have to eat enough of the right foods. And, of course, eat very little of the wrong foods. Is getting into ketosis safe without a doctor? Before reviewing how to get into ketosis quickly, let’s take a look at a quick background: T Continue reading >>

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

There’s a number of myths, misconceptions, and misinformation floating around that are confusing a lot of people about the ketogenic diet. They’re teaching that when you’re training, whether for strength or for endurance, that carbohydrates are necessary in order to get the best results. This is not true, and I’ll tell you why. You Need Carbs To Build Muscle People that tell you this don’t understand how muscle building really works – it’s entirely possible to be gaining muscle mass while on keto. In a simple way, the 3 easy steps to build muscle are: Eating enough protein – For mass building between 1.0 – 1.2g / pound of LEAN body mass. Eating a calorie surplus – You can’t build muscle without eating more calories than you need, and these come from fats in a ketogenic diet. Training correctly – You need to promote hypertrophy in your muscles. Are carbs good for building muscle? Of course they are – they promote insulin release and help restore glycogen in the muscles. With carbs you gain mass quicker, but that’s because you’re also gaining fat. What exactly is glycogen? It’s a molecule that our bodies use as energy. What exactly does glycogen do? Wikipedia explains it nicely: In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and the muscles, and functions as the secondary long-term energy storage (with the primary energy stores being fats held in adipose tissue). Muscle cell glycogen appears to function as an immediate reserve source of available glucose for muscle cells. Other cells that contain small amounts use it locally as well. As you can see, glycogen is being used as a secondary source of energy, where fats are being used over it. Once your body has become adapted to using fats (you’re in ketosis), then Continue reading >>

Breaking A Weight Loss Plateau

Breaking A Weight Loss Plateau

I know all about how annoying a low carb diet weight loss plateau can be. In 2008, I began to change my eating habits in order to address some serious health problems. I also wanted to lose the excess weight I had accumulated over the years while eating a poor diet full of processed junk food. It took several years and I still struggle with my weight, but then I'm a work in progress. The Most Common Causes of a Weight Loss Plateau Here is my opinion, born of my individual experience, on the most common causes of a weight loss plateau. If you are following a ketogenic diet, and not losing weight, or the weight loss is inconsistent (going down one week and up the next), here are some of the most common causes: Eating more carbohydrate than you think (fruit, nuts, and yogurt are the particular culprits here). I call this carb creep. Eating more calories than your body can handle without storing (this is usually the result of a very high fat intake - for me, too much dairy). You want to be burning your stored fat, not excess fat from your diet. Eating large amounts of low carb foods that elevate insulin. Dairy protein (hard cheeses, yogurt and whey protein in particular), sugar alcohols, and other artificial sweeteners are culprits here. Eating lots of coconut, coconut oil or MCT oil. Coconut oil has a lot of medium chain triglycerides in it. This type of fat can't be stored, so your body has to burn it first. Again, the goal is to burn your stored fat, not fat from your diet. Not exercising in a way that increases insulin sensitivity to the muscles. (The problem is that for people with a broken metabolism, long, slow exercise doesn't work well - it has to be high intensity exercise, which uses all the glycogen stored in the muscles, and makes them more insulin sensitive. T Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Be Extremely Active And Eat A Low Carbohydrate Diet?

Is It Possible To Be Extremely Active And Eat A Low Carbohydrate Diet?

In today’s interview, I speak with a surgeon, engineer and relentless self-experimenter, Dr. Peter Attia (pictured above as he swims across the Catalina Channel), about whether it is possibly to be extremely active and eat a low carbohydrate diet. If you’ve ever wondered whether it’s possible to keep yourself in a “ketogenic”, low carbohydrate state and still swim, bike, run, lift and do other extreme sports and activities, then this audio will answer all your questions. Let’s begin with a video of a workout being done by Dr. Attia, who I interview in today’s podcast: And he does all that while eating only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates per day! Dr. Attia (pictured right) of Canada is a relentless self-experimenter who has spent the last two years examining the role of nutrition on all aspects of personal performance. He is a former McKinsey & Company consultant, surgeon, engineer, calculus teacher and an author of numerous medical and research papers. Dr. Attia received his medical degree from Stanford University and holds a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, where he also taught and helped revamp the calculus curriculum. He did his surgical training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He also did a fellowship in surgical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Attia’s website, which we discuss during the interview, is WarOnInsulin.com. Here are the questions that I ask him: You have an interesting story. How did you come to start your website, WarOnInsulin.com, and what is it that you are trying to achieve? You appear to keep yourself very fit. Walk us through a typical week of exercise for you. For any given day, especially on thes Continue reading >>

Is It Dangerous To Exercise While On A Ketogenic Diet?

Is It Dangerous To Exercise While On A Ketogenic Diet?

Ketogenic diets restrict carbohydrate consumption. Dieters employ ketogenic diets for rapid weight loss. When subjected to a ketogenic diet, your body enters ketosis. Carbohydrates serve as the primary source of energy for the human body. Fat acts as a secondary source of energy. Because ketogenic diets restrict carbohydrate intake, energy needed for exercise comes from other sources. Scientists differ in opinion on the safety of exercise during a ketogenic diet. During ketosis, keto-acids build up in the blood, and are eliminated from your body through your kidneys. If keto-acids in the blood build up beyond the ability of the kidneys to eliminate the acid, fatigue, irregular heartbeat or dizziness may occur. Avoid exercise if you experience dizziness or irregular heartbeat while on a ketogenic diet. Both may represent serious conditions like dehydration or electrolyte imbalance. The aim of a ketogenic diet is to burn fat instead of carbohydrates. The human body uses fat as the primary source of energy during extended ketosis. Initially the body will use stored carbohydrates for energy. After depleting carbohydrates, the body switches to fat for fuel. Keto-acids or ketones, the end-product of incomplete fat metabolism, serve as a source of energy. While on a ketogenic diet, ketones provide energy for brain function. In their book "The Treament of Epilespy," Dr. Eric Kossoff and Dr. Eileen Vining note that ketones maintain 65 percent of brain energy when in ketosis. Inuit populations in the Arctic survived on low carbohydrate diets prior to the introduction of modern carbohydrate-based nutrition. Dr. Stephen D. Phinney, professor of Medicine Emeritus at University of California at Davis, suggests the carbohydrate-restricted diets of the Inuit population prove that ketog Continue reading >>

Modified Ketogenic Diet For Endurance Athletes

Modified Ketogenic Diet For Endurance Athletes

Ketogenic Diet Part I. Everyone has learned again and again that a balanced diet is key to optimal nutrition, yet there are a lot of “fad” diets, bundles of mixed information on the internet personal opinions and anecdotal success stories about the best methods of eating. Whether it’s low carb diets, juice cleansing, gluten-free, or any other “quick fix”, there are definitely pros and cons with each one. The research behind different diet methods and their results can be mixed, and the conclusions are often skewed to promote nutrition products for the companies that may be funding the research. The most challenging part of navigating all the research and information, especially for athletes, is figuring out how to apply it to individual nutrition needs. When fueling our bodies, taking anything to an extreme lends itself to creating a nutritional deficiency somewhere else. Numerous macro- and micronutrients work together to make our tissues, hormones, physiological systems, etc. function properly. The importance of balance and consistency in our food patterns applies to athletes especially as nutrition directly affects performance in training and competition. The purpose of this article is to look at the science behind the ketogenic diet (KD) and propose an applicable and balanced nutrition plan, a modified ketogenic diet, for endurance athletes based on individual needs, racing, and overall long-term health. In the preceding article “Reviewing research aspects of the ketogenic diet on endurance athlete performance: should I try it out?” Loulika Lili-Wiliams, PhD, accurately defines the KD as a high-fat, low carbohydrate and protein sufficient diet. KDs have traditionally been used by dietitians and doctors in clinical settings to treat neurological disorde Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Of all the places to seek life-changing nutrition advice, I never thought the barber shop would be where I found it. But one day last January, after a couple years of saying to myself, "today's the day I make a change," my barber schooled me on something called keto. Normally, I take things he says with a grain of salt unless they're about hair or owning a business, but this guy could literally be on the cover of Men's Health. He's 6 feet tall, conventionally attractive, and his arms are about five pull-ups away from tearing through his t-shirt. If anyone else had implied that I was looking rough, I would've walked out in a fit of rage, but I decided to hear him out. I should clarify that I was out of shape, but my case wasn't that severe. I hadn't exercised in a few years and basically ate whatever I wanted and however much of it, but I was only about 30 to 40 pounds overweight. My barber went on to explain that this diet, paired with an appropriate exercise routine, allowed him to completely transform his body in less than a year, and all he ate was fatty foods. Once he showed me his "before" picture, I was sold. It was time to actually make a change. Short for ketogenic, keto is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet that forces your metabolism into what's called a state of ketosis. There's a much more scientific explanation to that, but it basically means that instead of burning carbohydrates (mainly glucose, or sugars), your body switches to burning fat as a primary source for energy. Keto isn't necessarily about counting calories, though the basic idea of eating less in order to lose weight still applies. This is more of a calculated way to rewire your metabolism so that it burns fat more efficiently over time, using very specific levels of each macronutrient Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

CLEARLY the “eat less”, “eat low fat”, and “just eat everything in moderation” diets haven’t worked too well for most people. So, if you’re still trying to lose weight and keep it off, then maybe it’s time to try something that’s working for tens of thousands of people right now… The Ketogenic Diet. But is it all too good to be true? Yes, we believe Keto is fantastic for weight loss. We’ve just seen it work for way too many people (check out the success stories below). But it’s also not for everyone. So, in this post, we are giving you the real facts behind all the hype as well as real-life stories of people who have lost a lot of weight on Keto. PLUS, how to get started on Keto to lose weight in 5 EASY Steps. What is the Ketogenic Diet? THE HISTORY: Originally the Ketogenic diet was created as an effective treatment for epileptic children. BUT NOW: More and more people are finding that a Ketogenic diet has tons of benefits, including: a healthy way to lose weight, control blood sugar levels, improve your brain function, and potentially even reverse a myriad of health conditions. How does keto do this? The Keto diet puts your body into a powerful fat-burning metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. NUTRITIONAL KETOSIS: In nutritional ketosis, your body generally uses very few carbohydrates for energy. Instead, it switches to using ketones (which are produced from the breakdown of fats). That’s why the keto diet is often called a fat-burning diet… You can literally be burning your own body fat for energy! (It’s still unclear whether ketosis is the magical factor that makes a Keto diet so effective for weight-loss, but whatever it is, it seems to work!) So, how do we get into this nutritional ketosis state? You can get into nutritional k Continue reading >>

Low-carb/ketogenic Diets And Exercise Performance

Low-carb/ketogenic Diets And Exercise Performance

Low-carb and ketogenic diets are extremely popular. These diets have been around for a long time, and share similarities with paleolithic diets (1). Research has shown that lower-carb diets can help you lose weight and improve various health markers (2). However, the evidence on muscle growth, strength and performance is mixed (3, 4, 5). This article takes a detailed look at low-carb/ketogenic diets and physical performance. The guidelines for a low-carb diet vary between studies and authorities. In research, low-carb is usually classified as less than 30% of calories from carbs (6, 7). Most average low-carb diets consist of 50–150 grams of carbs per day, a fairly high amount of protein and a moderate-to-high fat intake. Yet for some athletes, "low-carb" can still mean over 200 grams of carbs per day. In contrast, a well-formulated ketogenic diet is more restrictive, usually consisting of only 30–50 grams of carbs per day, combined with a very high fat intake (8). This extremely low carb intake helps you achieve ketosis, a process where ketones and fat become the main sources of energy for the body and brain (9). There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet: This is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and 5% carbs (8). Cyclical ketogenic diet: This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet: This diet allows you to add carbs, usually around periods of intense exercise or workouts. The pie charts below show the typical nutrient breakdown of a low-fat Western diet, a low-carb diet and a typical ketogenic diet: In most low-carb and ketogenic diets, people restrict food sources like grain Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

“” —Passmore & Swindells, two British dietitians writing in the British Journal of Nutrition in 1963 Whether you agree with the above quote or think it’s hilarious nonsense, there’s no doubt that reduced carb diets are useful for losing body fat. A lot of people find that cutting carbs in favor of a higher protein, higher fat diet is the simplest way to get lean fast. However, people often make mistakes when going low-carb, especially if they are training hard in an effort to accelerate the fat loss process. With these 10 simple tips, you can make going low-carb a lot easier and get better fat loss results. Mistake #1: Not Restricting Carbohydrates Enough Low-carb, high-protein diets are effective for fat loss. This is a scientific fact. But, low-carb is a vague term. Simply cutting the average American man’s carb intake of 310 grams a day in half could be considered low-carb, but if you are overweight and your goal is fat loss, you most likely need to go a lot lower than 155 grams. A review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the 50 to 150 g/day range is too high for losing body fat in overweight, sedentary populations. A useful definition of a low-carb fat loss diet is less than 50 grams of carbs a day, which will lead to the production of ketones. When the body is producing ketones it is no longer relying on glucose (sugar from carbs) for its fuel source, which is a state that provides significant metabolic benefits and easier fat loss. Fix It: For best results, get those 50 grams of carbs from vegetables and select fruits, such as berries, or other low-carb fruit. Eliminate all grains—whole and processed. Mistake #2: You are Lean, Active & Restricting Carbs Too Much The AJCN definition of a low-carb diet as less than 50 grams a day w Continue reading >>

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

As the COO of Diet Doctor and low-carb enthusiast for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis years ago. I haven’t, and here’s why. Am I still in ketosis? To get into ketosis, the most important thing is to eat maximum 20 grams of digestible carbs per day. When I went low carb in 2012, I followed that advice to the letter – replacing all high-carb foods like potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, legumes, fruit, juice, soda, and candy, with eggs, dairy, meat, vegetables, fats and berries – counting every carb I consumed. I felt great – effortless weight loss, no stomach issues, tons of energy and inspiration. But over time, something changed – I no longer felt as great as I used to. Until recently, I had no idea why. The journey to find out started with a simple question: Am I still in ketosis? The moment of truth At a Diet Doctor dinner a while ago, our CTO, Johan, gently challenged me. “Bjarte, you’re eating quite a lot of protein. Have you measured your ketones lately?”. “No”, I said, feeling slightly defensive, “I’ve never measured my ketones. Should I?”. It was wake-up time. Johan and I grabbed two blood-ketone meters from a dusty drawer, pricked a finger each, and touched the ketone strips. His results came out first – 3.0 mmol/L – optimal ketosis. He looked happy. It was my turn. The ketone meter made a weird beeping sound and the screen started blinking – 0.0 mmol/L – no ketosis whatsoever. What?! I’d been eating strict low carb for years, how could I not be in ketosis? I felt slightly embarrassed, but mainly relieved. Was this the reason I no longer felt great? Experiment 1: Eating less than 60 grams of protein a day Several of my colleagues agreed with Johan – I was eating too much protein. To test that hypothesis, I s Continue reading >>

Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

One of the most popular critiques of a ketogenic diet – a diet that’s high in fat and low in carbs – is that it isn’t good for athletes. The argument is usually that you need carbs to produce glycogen, a stored form of sugar that fuels your muscles. As a result, most doctors and trainers suggest high-carb diets for athletes. If you’ve been working out while eating Bulletproof, Paleo, keto, or any other variation on a high-fat, low-carb diet, here’s some good news: brand new research shows that you not only don’t need carbs for athletic performance, you can actually gain an advantage if you cut them out. Let’s talk about how ketosis can kick your athletic performance into a higher gear. Why you don’t need carbs to train hard A groundbreaking new study out of UConn found that low-carb endurance athletes perform just as well as high-carb endurance athletes, if not better. The results challenge nearly 50 years of research saying the opposite. Until now, most studies have concluded that you top out at around 10% of energy recruited from fat [1] and for the rest you rely mostly on glycogen, a form of sugar stored in your muscles and liver. That’s the main reason high-carb diets have been the standard for athletes for so many years. With a low-carb diet, your glycogen stores empty quickly, you run out of fuel, and you start breaking down your muscles for energy. Right? Well, maybe not. If you teach your body to prefer fat for fuel you can work out intensely without any problems, according to this new study. The paper’s authors measured the performance of ultra-endurance runners who regularly run upwards of 100 miles. Here’s how they set it up: Half of the participants ate low-carb (<20% of calories from carbs) for 6 months The other half ate high-carb ( Continue reading >>

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