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Can I Drink Alcohol In Ketosis?

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

As I decided to change my evil ways and give up bread and pasta, as well as all the other carbs that suck me in like a tractor beam, I knew my inner imp would not allow me to perform this feat which I haven’t been able to do for some time without *some* rascality along the way. Because of this I decided to go through carb withdrawal while drinking copious amounts of red wine – 1 to 2 bottles a night. I didn’t track calories but would usually go through the day without much more than the fat from my coffee and cream in the morning and the use of Atkins shakes as a creamer in my coffee at work. There was a can or two of sardines in there as well. At home, I would accompany the wine with something small. Maybe a piece of salmon the size of my hand with 2 tablespoons of butter. A chopped veggie salad with oil and vinegar. 10 breakfast sausages with ketchup. I did not count calories but aside from the alcohol (which is not a carb but does have 7 calories per gram, making it calorically dense) the amounts eaten were small and even the rare carby stuff like the ketchup and 2 mouthfuls of mac and cheese I had would not have put me out of a carb total for any given day well below 50 grams. This worked extremely well in carb withdrawal. I seemed to lose my craving for carbs by the 2nd day in. I had 2 people at work discussing their prodigious eating over the weekend after I told them I started a diet and I said: “Thank you for telling me all this right after I told you I started a diet.” “You’re welcome.” One said without missing a beat, and they continued. I work with a tough crowd and certainly there was no maliciousness intended – busting chops is a sport where I work – a way of blowing off steam by busting one another. It is not for the faint of heart nor Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis?

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis?

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis? It is hard to have a social life in Ketogenic diet lacking alcohol. You’ll find carbs in bar and astonish if you should go for them or avoid. Great start is to cut all the wine and bear on Keto diet but you can stick to hard liquor. It is made up of grains, natural sugars, fruits and potatoes, and in the fermentation process sugar turned into ethyl alcohol. Alcohol & Ketosis: Some say, alcohol is zero in calories, is it wise to adopt it or not, some are confused and need a guide, yet it is better to give up on it. The Ketogenic diet is low-carb, medium-protein and high-fat content but the fourth macronutrient is alcohol. If you love drinking and want to enjoy it on Keto, but unaware of its guidelines, let us tell you the best. When you consume alcohol, body cells accelerate and detect it as a toxic element. Liver process it and takes resources from other procedures and one of this method is ketone production, i.e. oxidation of fat. The fact is alcohol drinking slows down ketonic production, hence weight loss. Liver metabolism accelerates and ketonic production increases with the increase of alcohol consumption. If you are following a proper diet, it is not wise to take too much liquor because it affects ketosis. Some legitimate concerns that many ketoers have when it comes to consuming wine or alcohol are described here so that you may find the necessary things before approaching your next drink. Is Alcohol a Low-Carb Drink? The main molecule of alcohol (ethanol) is same for all types of drinks. Yeast works with sugar to convert it into alcohol and carbon dioxide, but sugar element and the mixture of drink determine your body consumption level of alcohol. You need a low-carb drink, to get that follow this suggested lis Continue reading >>

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Many people believe that adherence to a ketogenic diet means avoiding alcohol altogether. Ketogenic.com does not condone the consumption of alcohol and while it may be true that strict ketogenic dieting may entail refraining from alcohol, the everyday ketogenic connoisseur not following the diet for therapeutic reasons may choose to occasionally enjoy low carb drinks. It is interesting to point out that alcohol itself can actually be ketogenic! In short, ethanol (alcohol) is broken down in the liver to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), free acetate, or broken down through various condensation reactions. As we know, acetyl-CoA can either be utilized in the Krebs Cycle, used for ketogenesis, or to produce ketone bodies, acetoacetate (AcAc), or in peripheral blood increases about 20 times the normal level when ethanol is present; n (1)! Along with the rise of acetate, we also see a considerable increase in AcAc and BHB (2). While it is true that alcohol consumption could result in ketogenesis, Ketogenic.com certainly does not condone this method of inducing ketosis for obvious reasons. I know what you’re thinking… you didn’t click on this article to read about the biochemistry of alcohol metabolism – and if you did – check back soon for a much more detailed article on this topic and the science behind alcohol! Odds are you came here to learn how to have low carb drinks while remaining in ketosis. The main thing to remember when drinking is alcohol does contain calories – approximately 7 calories per gram. More importantly to the ketogenic dieter, most alcohols contain a significant amount of carbohydrates, which can not only blunt fat metabolism but also prevent ketogenesis from occurring (3,4,5). It goes without saying that it is critical to always drink respons Continue reading >>

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Meredith Dykstra: Welcome to Cellular Healing TV. I’m your host Meredith Dykstra and this is Episode Number 146, and we have Dr. Dan Pompa, our resident cellular healing specialist on the line. Today we have a very special guest, and his name is Todd White. Todd White is a wine expert and we have a lot of fun things to talk about. This is not your average wine that he makes. We’re going to talk a lot about wine today, but before we delve in, let me tell you guys a little bit more about Todd. Todd White has been a serial entrepreneur and creator since he was age 17. Today, after 15 years in the wine business, his life is dedicated to educating and helping people make better choices about food nutrition and how they think about consuming alcohol. He is the founder of Drive Farm Wine, a writer, speaker, and a leading authority on healthy organic natural wines, and the importance of micro-dosing alcohol for health, longevity, and vitality. Todd’s passion is unlocking the best way to enjoy alcohol, how to enjoy the benefits of modern consumption while avoiding the negative outcomes. Todd has been a featured guest on many of the nation’s leading health influential podcasts, including David Asbury, Bullet Proof Radio; Mark Sisson, Primal Blue Print; Abel James, Fat Burning Man; Rob Wolf’s, Paleo Solution; and Jimmy Moore, Living Low-carb Show. Todd is a self-described biohacker who practices daily meditation, Wim Hof breathing, cold thermogenesis, a ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, and he is a fitness enthusiast. He’s also a frequent speaker on ketogenic lifestyle, and is completing a cookbook on the ketogenic diet and lifestyle to be released this fall called, Keto Well. He was most recently the featured ketogenic speaker at the 2016 Bulletproof annual confer Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

51 minutes Carl and Richard discuss alcohol, how it is metabolized, particularly by those eating a ketogenic diet. They discuss the carbohydrate content of typical drinks, and share a couple yummy keto-friendly cocktail recipes. Errata: Richard said he'd had 3 Bottles of Moët before the show - but it was actually 3 GLASSES of Moët. Also Richard said he didn't know of research substantiating Alcohol inhibiting gluconeogenesis and 5 minutes after we finished recording he found one from Hans Krebs (linked below). Update: May 11, 2016: Carl did an n=1 study on himself by following a 22/2 intermittent fasting pattern for 3 weeks. He ate only dinner, but had drinks with and after dinner. The result was a big plateau. No major weight loss. He then did a 2 day fast and started eating his one meal at lunch time (with no alcohol) saving the drinks for the evening. The results were positive. He started losing a pound a day. His hypothesis: When you drink alcohol your liver stops metabolizing food and focuses on the alcohol. Once all the calories are extracted from the alcohol the liver goes right back to metabolizing food, but now your caloric intake has increased and some of the calories from the food will not be used, and some of the fat will be stored in the fat cells. By giving the body time to process the food intake, you allow the liver to do it's job. More fat gets burned. By the time you introduce alcohol a bigger chunk of your lunch has already been metabolized. Listen Links Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets And Alcohol: Can I Still Drink And Lose Weight?

Low-carb Diets And Alcohol: Can I Still Drink And Lose Weight?

Almost everyone loves a bit of a drink now and then. But you’ve started a low-carb diet, and you’re wondering – can I still drink and lose weight? Do low-carb diets and alcohol mix? What about the dreaded “beer belly?” Thankfully, I’m here to answer your questions, and tell you (hopefully) everything you need to know about having a good night out and still being low-carb. But first, a little bit of background about how our bodies react to alcohol (it’s important, trust me). Alcohol and carbs and fats, oh my! Contrary to what you may believe, alcohol isn’t inherently carb-loaded (beer, however, is). So drinking pure ethanol isn’t going to kick you out of ketosis (it will, however, likely kill you. DO NOT DRINK PURE ETHANOL). However, while alcohol isn’t a carb, it does contain calories – 7 calories per gram, to be precise, which is almost double the 4 calories per gram that carbs and protein contain, and only a little bit less than fat, at 9 calories per gram. Does this mean that you’ll gain weight by drinking alcohol? Not necessarily, it turns out. First of all, it actually takes a fair amount of energy for the body to actually process alcohol, so the net calories are closer to 5.6/g. Secondly, our bodies aren’t that great at converting it to fat, so the energy contained in it tends to get used. Thirdly, moderate drinking is actually associated with a number of health benefits, including improved insulin sensitivity and reduced triglyceride levels. So the odd drink here and there can potentially be good for you! However, it’s not all good news. When we consume alcohol, our bodies burn it preferentially to fats, carbs, and proteins, probably because its byproduct is toxic and we need to get rid of it fast. So when you drink, fat-burning stops Continue reading >>

Drinking And Banting?

Drinking And Banting?

One of the biggest mental obstacles for people to overcome when they start on a Low Carb High Fat lifestyle is the no alcohol recommendation. It was a big obstacle for us – when we started I didn’t have any alcohol for about the first month – which in my case with my insulin resistance was necessary. Let me explain … our weakness was red wine … about a week in to the lifestyle we made a gorgeous cheese platter with biltong and pork crackling and Vinny said, “Come on, this is crying for a glass of wine!” so I gave in and had half a glass of red wine. Up until that point I had lost 1.8kgs and low and behold when I got on the scale the next morning after that 1/2 glass of wine, I had gained the entire 1.8kgs back! And I started again from the beginning and vowed I would not have any wine … and I didn’t for a few months. Now, being less insulin resistant, I can indulge in red wine now and again and not have the same consequences but as I rule, I try and make better drink choices more in line with my low carb high fat lifestyle. So … don’t be mistaken … I recommend NO alcohol if you’re following the lifestyle strictly or if you are looking to maximise your weight-loss! Why is alcohol not recommended? Well in short … when you put alcohol in your system … fat burning stops while your body rids itself of the alcohol … that’s the very unscientific layman’s explanation. Anything that takes you out of fat burning / Ketosis should be avoided. Living a low carb high fat lifestyle is all about staying in Ketosis and running on fat. When you are out of Ketosis, it can take anywhere from a couple of days to up to 6 weeks to get back in to Ketosis … so imagine if you are drinking / cheating every second day, you will never get into ketosis and never Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

I get it. You want to adopt a healthy lifestyle but you don’t know if drinking alcohol on the ketogenic diet is a smart idea. Obviously alcohol is bad for you. We all know this. And it’s obviously one of the most abused yet socially acceptable substances out there. No one wants to be the guy/gal who doesn’t go out on a friday night just because you’re on a diet. With that being said, it’s important to take necessary precautions especially on a low carb high fat ketogenic diet. It’s completely possible to stay in ketosis and still enjoy a couple drinks here and there. Can I Still Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet? Yes but you have to be careful. If you want to successfully stay in ketosis, you have to choose your drinks wisely. Drinking low carb or zero carb drinks will ensure that after your body utilizes the alcohol as a source of fuel, that you are back into ketosis immediately after. When we consume alcohol, our body starts working to metabolize it in order to use it as energy. When we start to feel “drunk” this is due to our body’s metabolizing the alcohol. Drinking alcohol disrupts our fat burning processes because it prioritizes the processing of alcohol before anything else since it is toxic to our body’s. This is why some people experience the stalling of weight-loss when they drink alcohol. What Will Happen To My Alcohol Tolerance On The Ketogenic Diet? Since you are restricting any form of glycogen (through carbs) on the ketogenic diet, your liver glycogen storages are already depleted which means you are running off of fats instead of glucose, thus, burning fat more effectively. Someone on a high carb diet has plenty of glycogen stored in their body. This gives your body a buffer before metabolizing alcohol. So what does this all mean ex Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis

Alcohol And Ketosis

ALCOHOL AND KETOSIS I once had a client who told me he HAD to have a few glasses of wine in the evening so he would blow ketones in the morning and if he didn’t drink, ketones were not present. UM, WHAT? Yep, he was right. A breath ketone tester is a lot like the breathalyzer that police use. Which made me think if someone in ketosis gets pulled over and asked to blow in a breathalyzer would they be in trouble just for being in ketosis?… So what about ‘Alcohol and Ketosis’? But the truth is alcohol does not help you get into ketosis if anything alcohol is holding you back from your best self. Not only physically but mentally. ALCOHOL FACTS When people go on a diet, they often choose the “light” version of their favorite alcoholic beverages in order to save a few calories. However, that is only a small piece of the puzzle. Fat metabolism is reduced by as much as 73% after only two alcoholic beverages. This scary fact shows that the primary effect of alcohol on the body is not so much how many calories we consume, but how it stops the body’s ability to use your fat stores for energy. Muscle Tip: Drinking alcohol is the most efficient way to slash your testosterone levels; women…we don’t want this to happen either. Just a single event of serious drinking raises levels of the muscle-wasting stress hormone called cortisol and decreases the levels of testosterone for up to 24 hours. If you are working out to build strong fat-burning muscles yet consuming alcohol, this actually breaks down muscle further and you end up with a slower metabolism. This is because you break down muscle as you lift weights and you repair them as you rest if you have proper hormone levels…if not, you never repair your muscles properly! Alcohol in the body is converted into a subs Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Keto: Can I Drink On The Keto Diet?

Alcohol And Keto: Can I Drink On The Keto Diet?

Can I drink on the keto diet? Yes, AND it can slow down weight loss. Alcohol provides calories without any added nutritional benefit, no vitamins or minerals like we get from other keto foods included in our Keto meal plan. hard liquor. Assuming we are talking gin, tequila, vodka, whiskey, or rum, these do not affect your insulin levels and, more than likely, do not affect your ability to stay in ketosis. Having a couple of cocktails, provided they do NOT contain sugary additives, is perfectly fine. Why does drinking alcohol on the keto diet slow down weight loss? When you drink the liver will start to process alcohol as quickly as possible. If the liver is processing alcohol instead of creating ketones you will burn less fat. When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, ketone production. What conditions promote Ketosis? I heard drinking liquor can increase ketone production is this true? Yes drinking hard alcohol can affect your level of ketosis, but remember it will slow weight loss down. Alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Caution You may notice your alcohol tolerance is lower when eating a keto diet, Many people get drunk at a quicker rate than usual on the Keto Diet. Thus moderation is important when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. Many people also experience excruciating hangovers while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. Th Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

A very common question we get is, am I okay to consume alcohol on a ketogenic diet? While drinking the occasional low carb beer is okay, you’ll be better off consuming a dry red wine. A recent study found that individuals following a ketogenic diet still experienced the positive health changes of being in ketosis, even while incorporating a dry red wine into their diet. Study Overview – This study allowed ketogenic dieters to consume red wine for 12 weeks, and subjects still demonstrated: Reduced blood pressure Reduced LDL cholesterol Increased HDL cholesterol Lower total cholesterol Lower blood glucose Key Points – Dry wine is more keto friendly since it is lower in sugar. Select dry red wines, such as; Malbec, Merlot, or Cabernet Sauvignon. Wine contains Resveratrol, which can promote fat burning. Additional Benefits of Red Wine – Improves heart health Improves cholesterol Reduces Inflammation Improves symptoms of diabetes Lowers risk of neurodegenerative disease Remember, it’s okay to drink alcohol on a ketogenic diet, but keep moderation in mind so that you don’t throw your body out of ketosis. Test your ketone levels after drinking alcohol to see how many glasses it takes to consume to affect your blood ketone levels. NOTE: Consider supplementing your diet with an exogenous ketone such as, KETO//OS, before and after consuming alcohol to keep the body in therapeutic levels of ketosis. Continue reading >>

Alcohol And The Dreaded Keto Hangover

Alcohol And The Dreaded Keto Hangover

So, your new keto diet is going pretty well. Your energy levels are up, you’re losing weight and just generally feeling pretty good. It seems like cause for celebration, so you go out for drinks with some friends. You don’t overdo it – at least, you don’t feel like you do. You’re just having a normal, moderate number of drinks, right? For some reason, though, you start feeling the effects of the alcohol much more quickly than usual. And in the morning, despite consuming what you thought was a responsible amount of booze, you feel sick as a dog. The hangover is worse than any you’ve experienced in years, maybe a decade or more. What happened? Ketosis and Alcohol Tolerance A reduced tolerance for alcohol is one of the things newbies to keto often learn about the hard way. Even people who are warned in advance are often shocked by just how much their tolerance has changed. Not only do you get tipsy a whole lot earlier in the evening, you can really end up paying for it hard the next day. There are actually a number of reasons this happens when you’re on a ketogenic diet. Dehydration – As with your standard hangover, the hangovers you get while in ketosis are largely a product of dehydration. Carbs actually store a fair amount of water, so when you’re avoiding them, you’re also reducing your ability to store water. This means dehydration is a bigger risk. You’re not just losing water, either. You’re also losing valuable electrolytes like magnesium, sodium and potassium. These chemicals are part of a complex system that regulates almost every part of your body, from the beating of your heart to the voluntary movement of your muscles, so it’s bad news when they’re running low. Your happy liver – When you start to feel the buzz of alcohol, that is Continue reading >>

24: High Blood Ketone Levels, Effect Of Alcohol On Ketosis, Doing Keto Without Exercise

24: High Blood Ketone Levels, Effect Of Alcohol On Ketosis, Doing Keto Without Exercise

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam have some fabulous questions to answer for you in Episode 24! KEY QUOTE: “Initially you’ll see a higher level of ketones (when you begin eating ketogenic). But as the body becomes better able to use the ketones, the overall level will drop to more normal readings.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 24: – Is there any such thing as too high ketone levels? I have been strictly keto for almost 3 weeks (between 75-85% fat, around 5% carbs and between 10-15% proteins). I’m a bit concerned because my ketones levels have been between 4.5-6.3. And my glucose levels are 53 and 80. My purpose in being ketogenic is to lose weight. As I understand it, if we go over 3, then you can’t lose weight. But, is this dan Continue reading >>

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