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Can I Drink Alcohol In Ketosis?

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, you train your body to begin using fats for energy rather than carbohydrates. This is also known as a state of ketosis which is indicated by the production of a by-product called ketones. What happens to ketone levels when you introduce alcohol into the mix? Interestingly enough, our bodies treat alcohol like any carbohydrate, in that it is sent to the front of the line to be used as energy. While your body burns calories from the alcohol you consumed, ketosis will be "paused." You won't get kicked out and have to reinitiate it, but ketone production will momentarily cease while your body burns the alcohol. Effects of Drinking and Caution One of the best features of ketogenic dieting is that you can easily drink alcohol in moderation without setting your diet goals back. There are a few things you should remember when drinking alcohol while in ketosis: Ketogenic dieters experience notoriously bad hangovers. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water in between drinks. While drinking liquor won't ruin your diet, all things in moderation. Excess carbohydrates and calories will still slow down your weight loss, so make sure you keep drinking to a minimum when possible. Don't forget to consider mixers when calculating your carb counts. Use diet sodas and artificially sweetened juices instead of their full-carbohydrate counterparts. Don't let alcohol affect your willpower! The intoxicating effects may tempt you to stray from your diet, but don't eat those french fries! Try to have some low carb snacks lined up that you can resort to when you get hungry. Below are a few of the most popular types of alcohol, along with their calorie and carbohydrate counts. Have fun and be safe! Calories and Carbohydrates in Liquor (1 oz.) Alcohol Name Calories (kcal) Carbo Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

A very common question we get is, am I okay to consume alcohol on a ketogenic diet? While drinking the occasional low carb beer is okay, you’ll be better off consuming a dry red wine. A recent study found that individuals following a ketogenic diet still experienced the positive health changes of being in ketosis, even while incorporating a dry red wine into their diet. Study Overview – This study allowed ketogenic dieters to consume red wine for 12 weeks, and subjects still demonstrated: Reduced blood pressure Reduced LDL cholesterol Increased HDL cholesterol Lower total cholesterol Lower blood glucose Key Points – Dry wine is more keto friendly since it is lower in sugar. Select dry red wines, such as; Malbec, Merlot, or Cabernet Sauvignon. Wine contains Resveratrol, which can promote fat burning. Additional Benefits of Red Wine – Improves heart health Improves cholesterol Reduces Inflammation Improves symptoms of diabetes Lowers risk of neurodegenerative disease Remember, it’s okay to drink alcohol on a ketogenic diet, but keep moderation in mind so that you don’t throw your body out of ketosis. Test your ketone levels after drinking alcohol to see how many glasses it takes to consume to affect your blood ketone levels. NOTE: Consider supplementing your diet with an exogenous ketone such as, KETO//OS, before and after consuming alcohol to keep the body in therapeutic levels of ketosis. Continue reading >>

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

A recent article in the International Journal of Obesity should give low-carbers cause for a little alarm. Here is what happened to a man in Sweden on a low-carb diet: We report a case of a 59-year-old man, body mass index 26.6 kg/m2, who began a weight reduction program, partly because of knee pains but also because he was a glider pilot where weight is important. He used a Swedish textbook on obesity treatment written by S Rössner together with the commonly used Swedish VLCD [very low calorie diet] Nutrilett (Cederroths, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 packets/day for 3 weeks, which is an approved standard regimen. This treatment resulted in a weight loss of 7 kg. During dieting, the man discovered that an alcohol ignition interlock device, installed in an official company car, indicated that he had consumed alcohol and the vehicle failed to start. This was confusing because the man was a life-long teetotaller and was therefore both surprised and upset by the result. As he had been supervising private aviation he had access to a second breath-alcohol analyzer, which indicated a simultaneous BAC ranging from 0.01 to 0.02 g/100 ml. A VLCD diet (very-low-calorie diet, a protein-sparing modified fast) contains mainly protein along with a small amount of carbohydrate and very few calories, usually fewer than 1000 per day. Just about anyone going on one of these diets will soon be in producing ketone bodies at a pretty high rate. But the same goes for a more traditional low-carb diet as well. If carbs are kept at a low level, ketosis will occur. In fact, it’s desired. Ketone bodies are water-soluble products of fat metabolism. The body has three ways of dealing with ketones: it can burn them for energy (which it does with great success), it can release them in the urine (which is Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet?

Can I drink on a ketogenic diet? Should I drink on a ketogenic diet? What can I drink on the diet? How will alcohol affect my success? Here are the answers! Alcohol done the KetoKlarity way! The short answer is that you can drink alcohol whilst on the diet – BUT it is important to understand what you can drink, how much you can drink and when to drink. Not all alcohols are created equal – you probably know this from terrible hangovers you get with some lower quality drinks. However, when it comes to getting into ketosis and staying in ketosis you need to know one thing – how much sugar is there in my drink? The good news is that most liquors like vodka, whiskey, white rum, and gin are low in sugar and relatively low in calories. Beer on the other hand is full of calories so you probably can’t lift that craft beer to your lips! On average a shot of liquor is roughly equal to 1.5 oz and contains about 65 calories. However, it is important to remember that flavoured liquors often contain significantly more calories and carbs. So stick to the unflavoured original liquors! My personal favourite is a vodka martini with a slice of lemon and lime shaken over ice – yes I am a British secret agent! If you are looking for a mixer then you MUST avoid fruit juices. Low calorie and zero sugar options are available but if possible try to stick to just ice or cold water. Why? Well there is some evidence that even low calorie/zero sugar fizzy drinks can increase your chances of developing metabolic syndrome – more on this in another blog post! Beer is much harder to accommodate especially if you love craft beers and ales. However, a variety of low carb and low calorie beers are now available and these include (per 12oz bottle): Bud Select 55: 55 calories, 1.9g carbs MGD 64: Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Is It Possible To Drink Alcohol and Lose Weight? Drink alcohol and lose weight? Is it possible? If the calories, themselves, were the only factor; the alcohol wouldn’t be such a culprit in your weight loss efforts. After all, research has shown us that having the equivalent to one drink a day does offer certain cardiovascular benefits. Unfortunately, there’s more to it than that. First of all, the calories in alcohol are considered to be “empty” calories. Alcohol doesn’t provide the vitamins and minerals that you get in healthy foods and each gram of alcohol has about seven calories. Now, that’s before you consider any mixers you may be using. Adding fruit juice, soda or a pina colada mix to your ounce of rum can turn up the sabotage dial very quickly. Second, the alcohol slows down the fat burning process. The calories you consume when drinking alcohol are transformed into acetate and burned quickly, not stored in your body. So that means all of your dieting and exercising goes toward burning the alcohol calories first, rather than burning the fat that you’re trying to eliminate. If you don’t burn these acetate calories off, they’ll be stored in your body as fat along with the ones you’ve been trying to lose. For this reason, alcohol calories tend to be stored in the stomach and that’s why it’s sometimes referred to as the “straight-to-the-stomach” beverage. Third, and perhaps the most pervasive of all, is the simple fact that after a couple of drinks, your willpower will waiver. This makes it difficult to drink alcohol and lose weight effectively. It doesn’t take much to convince yourself that just one little slice of pizza would be okay after you’ve had a drink or two. The results that show up on the scale after a couple of incidences Continue reading >>

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Keto Alcohol – Can You Drink Alcohol On Low Carb Diets?

Do keto diets and alcohol mix? Are there even keto alcoholic drinks? Alcohol is one of the hardest things to avoid throughout your adult life. As soon as you hit a legal drinking age, you’ll find that many of your social outings tend to revolve around drinking and having a good time. Whether you’re hitting up a club, the local pub, or gathering at a friend’s place for an intimate night in, it can be pretty difficult to avoid depending on your social situations. Lucky for me (or unlucky…), I wasn’t quite the social butterfly so I was able to steer away from alcohol for most of my diet. On the rare occasions that I did go out, I tried to limit my alcohol intake or make conscious choices to minimize negative impact on my results. How Does Alcohol Affect Keto Diets? Can alcohol knock me out of ketosis? Alcohol will not necessarily knock one out of ketosis, but it may result in stalling weight loss. While alcohol is made from fermenting starches and sugars, which are technically carbs, they are stripped of nutritional value during this process. You can treat alcohol almost as if it were a fourth macro nutrient (along with carbs, protein and fat). While the basic process of a keto diet is that you restrict your body’s carbohydrate intake so that it resorts to using fats as the main energy source. However, since alcohol is considered a toxin to your body, it is metabolized within your first before carbs and fats, which can result in stalling. Your body will need to burn through and remove the alcohol from the system before it can continue burning fat as fuel. It can also potentially cause weight loss stalls since 1g of alcohol has 7 calories which can add up quickly with all those shots. If you’re really interested in seeing the effects on your body, or if you’ Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

51 minutes Carl and Richard discuss alcohol, how it is metabolized, particularly by those eating a ketogenic diet. They discuss the carbohydrate content of typical drinks, and share a couple yummy keto-friendly cocktail recipes. Errata: Richard said he'd had 3 Bottles of Moët before the show - but it was actually 3 GLASSES of Moët. Also Richard said he didn't know of research substantiating Alcohol inhibiting gluconeogenesis and 5 minutes after we finished recording he found one from Hans Krebs (linked below). Update: May 11, 2016: Carl did an n=1 study on himself by following a 22/2 intermittent fasting pattern for 3 weeks. He ate only dinner, but had drinks with and after dinner. The result was a big plateau. No major weight loss. He then did a 2 day fast and started eating his one meal at lunch time (with no alcohol) saving the drinks for the evening. The results were positive. He started losing a pound a day. His hypothesis: When you drink alcohol your liver stops metabolizing food and focuses on the alcohol. Once all the calories are extracted from the alcohol the liver goes right back to metabolizing food, but now your caloric intake has increased and some of the calories from the food will not be used, and some of the fat will be stored in the fat cells. By giving the body time to process the food intake, you allow the liver to do it's job. More fat gets burned. By the time you introduce alcohol a bigger chunk of your lunch has already been metabolized. Listen Links Continue reading >>

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

088.8KSHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS and Keto Max from Pruvit provide exogenous ketones. Maximize your ketone levels with a ketogenic diet approved food list. What is Ketosis? Explore the health benefits of ketosis for accelerated fat loss, disease prevention, better brain function, appetite control, performance, and more. Ketosis can often be a misunderstood subject. Some think it is part of a starvation diet or a alarming sign that something has gone wrong in your metabolism. But this is simply not the truth! You see, ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. Have you ever heard someone say that fats are “evil”? This has become the standard way of thinking in today’s society, which has led to our primary energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Most people eat a diet high in carbohydrates or glucose. When sugar is your body’s primary energy source, that sugar needs to be processed first in the cell soup before it can be passed into the energy factory of the cell- the mitochondrion. Energy sources from fat don’t require this processing; it goes directly into the mitochondria for energetic uses. That is, it is more complicated to create energy out of sugar than out of fat. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. “Carbohydrates are not required to obtain energy. Fat supplies more energy than a comparable amount of carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate diets tend to make your system of producing energy more efficient. Furthermore, many organs prefer Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

When it involves ketogenic dieting and consuming alcohol, there are lots of confusing and different opinions around, and it can drive you to make all sorts of mistakes. One of those difficult areas is how alcohol can fit in with a keto lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have better knowledge after reading and then able to make sensible decisions on your ketogenic diet journey. Since just because you don’t consume carbs does not mean the end of a social life. You may be asking yourself can I drink alcohol on keto? The quick answer is of course. One way of thinking about it is to think of it as a once in a while treat the same as you would as eating a cheat meal. As long as you have no medical requirements that would otherwise forbid it, then it’s absolutely okay to consume alcohol in moderation while on a low-carb or keto diet. However, you must be conscious of all the carbohydrates you are drinking which is essentially empty calories. Alcohol slows Ketosis Consuming alcohol won’t kick you out of ketosis initially, but it will severely hamper any potential results. If unsure whether you are in ketosis see our post on how to tell if you’re in ketosis. Your body has no way of storing the energy in alcohol, so before your body can use other energy sources, you burn the calories in alcohol first. Alcohol is not stored as glycogen, so you are quickly back into lipolysis after the alcohol is processed. So, while you consume alcohol, everything in your body is on pause, and it’s not processing fats for energy. Weight loss is merely delayed not stopped. Most people when beginning a ketogenic diet will have to track their macronutrients to be sure to maintain ketosis. The main macros to track that provide us energy during the day are protein 4 calories Continue reading >>

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Hey all. I was bumping around the paleo inter-webs and came across this little nugget on ketosis: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC! Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal. Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol! - Link Although I'm philosophically ketosis-agnostic, I do best on a lowish carb diet and most likely find myself in ketosis from time-to-time. I'm wondering what you think of this warning. Is the science sound? Should ketotic boozers eat a sweet potato before hitting the firewater this xmas? Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Everything You Need To Know About Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Let me be real with you for a second… I was born in the USSR and spent the majority of my life there. Alcohol is running through my veins from generations to generations of Eastern European drinking culture. It is only logical to create the ultimate keto diet alcohol cheat sheet. Alcohol is not only a topic that I want to discuss but I also want to share some Russian hacks that I use to stay ketogenic and tipsy at the same time. Keto diet macros Most people on ketogenic diet track their macros. Macros are macronutrients in short. There are 3 main macronutrients that provide us with energy throughout the day: protein, fat, and carbs. Where does ketosis and alcohol fit in? Interestingly enough, alcohol is the fourth macronutrient. It provides us with plenty of fun and energy on weekends. Alcohol runs at 7 calories per gram. That is a lot of energy! In comparison, fat runs at 9 calories per gram, protein and carbs at 4 calories per gram. It should give you an idea that drinking a lot can easily put you overboard with your daily keto caloric intake. I want to admit that I have done this multiple times. No worries, alcohol during keto can be done. So, for example, you go out with your friends and it feels like a fun night so you take 2 tequila shots. What happens to that liquor in your body? BTW, high five on that keto sodium intake with tequila. It definitely helped you out. Our body processes alcohol as a toxic substance. About 98% of it gets metabolized by our liver and another %2 is excreted through our keto urine, keto sweat, and even keto breath. Russian Alcohol Hack #1: Before you start drinking, take 2-3 activated charcoal pills. No hangover since 1995. Proven to work for me. Keto alcohol tolerance Let’s go back to the two tequila shots that you just took. If you Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets And Alcohol: Can I Still Drink And Lose Weight?

Low-carb Diets And Alcohol: Can I Still Drink And Lose Weight?

Almost everyone loves a bit of a drink now and then. But you’ve started a low-carb diet, and you’re wondering – can I still drink and lose weight? Do low-carb diets and alcohol mix? What about the dreaded “beer belly?” Thankfully, I’m here to answer your questions, and tell you (hopefully) everything you need to know about having a good night out and still being low-carb. But first, a little bit of background about how our bodies react to alcohol (it’s important, trust me). Alcohol and carbs and fats, oh my! Contrary to what you may believe, alcohol isn’t inherently carb-loaded (beer, however, is). So drinking pure ethanol isn’t going to kick you out of ketosis (it will, however, likely kill you. DO NOT DRINK PURE ETHANOL). However, while alcohol isn’t a carb, it does contain calories – 7 calories per gram, to be precise, which is almost double the 4 calories per gram that carbs and protein contain, and only a little bit less than fat, at 9 calories per gram. Does this mean that you’ll gain weight by drinking alcohol? Not necessarily, it turns out. First of all, it actually takes a fair amount of energy for the body to actually process alcohol, so the net calories are closer to 5.6/g. Secondly, our bodies aren’t that great at converting it to fat, so the energy contained in it tends to get used. Thirdly, moderate drinking is actually associated with a number of health benefits, including improved insulin sensitivity and reduced triglyceride levels. So the odd drink here and there can potentially be good for you! However, it’s not all good news. When we consume alcohol, our bodies burn it preferentially to fats, carbs, and proteins, probably because its byproduct is toxic and we need to get rid of it fast. So when you drink, fat-burning stops Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

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