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Can I Drink Alcohol In Ketosis?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

As the festive party season fast approaches, a common question raised by my clients is ‘Am I able to have an alcoholic drink whilst on the ketogenic diet?’ So I thought I’d put together all of my thoughts around ketosis and alcohol and share it with the rest of my followers. For starters, let take a look at what happens to our body when we consume alcohol. When we drink alcohol, it gets absorbed very quickly into our bloodstream via our stomach and small intestine. Alcohol is toxic and as a result, the body tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible by breaking it down into non toxic substances, carbon dioxide and water. This detoxification process takes place in the liver. The liver is unable to process all of the alcohol in the bloodstream at once, so the body has other ways of getting rid of it, via urine, sweat and even the lungs. Ketosis and alcohol: the effect on weight loss Alcohol is best avoided on a keto diet because it impacts insulin levels and the whole point of eating a ketogenic diet is to control insulin by lowering blood sugar levels enough to allow use fat for fuel (preferably your own body fat if you’re trying to lean down). Insulin is the hormone that prevents this from happening and essentially locks body fat in, preventing it from being an accessible fuel source. When alcohol is consumed, there’s typically an initial rise in blood sugars. The amount to which is rises depends on how much you’ve drank. This is because the body is trying to rid itself of the toxic alcohol, rather than controlling its blood sugar levels. As the body detoxifies, insulin then spikes to allow blood sugar levels to be controlled. Ketone levels also drop. This locks the body fat in and halts the fat burning process! This is exactly the opposite of what we wan Continue reading >>

The Can I Have List

The Can I Have List

We often get asked if you can have different products on the programme, and for some items the answer is yes. We then get asked if we can have them why aren't they listed on your website? Well the answer to that is, you can have for example some "Coke Zero" but we do not promote fizzy drinks or recommend that you drink "Coke Zero" so therefore we do not add it to our website as part of the plan. Therefore, we have made a list of the items we are asked about most frequently. We are not endorsing these products for you to use on the plan, we are only confirming that you can have them if you want to. There are also some items listed below to double confirm that you can not have them whilst on the plan. Condiments Salt which is a mineral, is allowed on the diet. You may also use pepper. Fry Light can be used sparingly for cooking. Fizzy Drinks Many diet drinks tend to contain 'Citric Acid' which in some people can cause problems with getting in, or staying in ketosis. We had tried to keep a list of "Ketosis friendly drinks" but due to manufacturers changing ingredients it's essential that you ensure the products you choose are suitable to the plan. Things to watch out for: Ingredients contains no Citric Acid. Calories per 100ml are less than 2 Kcal. Please see the drinks list here. Tea and Coffee Tea and coffee are fine to consume providing you are not using milk beyond your daily allowance. Some people may find it harder to get into ketosis with high levels of caffeine so it would be wise to minimise tea and coffee in the first four days of the plan. Herbs and Spices Herbs and Spices are allowed in moderation as long as they are fresh or dried. Therefore no processed products are allowed. There are far too many many herbs and spices to list here so if you are not sure plea Continue reading >>

Choose Your Booze: A Guide To Healthy Drinking

Choose Your Booze: A Guide To Healthy Drinking

198 Comments It’s the question every Primal adherent faces: how does alcohol fit into a low carb lifestyle? Maybe you’re out with friends, bravely resisting the assorted chips and fried concoctions in the center of the table. You don’t mind waiting patiently for the steak and salad you conscientiously selected, but must you be relegated to the likes of club soda and tap water? What would happen exactly if you ordered, well, a “drink-drink”? A nice glass of red wine perhaps? Hmmm…maybe that’s too much to ask at a place where onion blooms are a specialty…. A mixed drink? You begin reminiscing about those great sidecars your best friendused to make. Maybe a shot? That’s simple enough, isn’t it? How about those memories? Well, maybe we’ll fast forward through those recollections. Beer? Beer belly. What about a light beer? They’re low in carbs, right? Whatever the case, you presume there’s no Guinness in your future tonight. Or? Sigh. Now you really need something. What’s a Primal type to do when it comes to a simple social drink? Indeed, there are some legitimate scientific reasons to enjoy alcohol in moderation. Alcohol as a blood thinner enhances vascular health, and the phenolic content (potent antioxidants) can pack a healthy punch. Research has compared alcohol abstention with moderate and “heavy” drinking. Moderate alcohol consumption appears (PDF) to lower the incidence of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, total and ischaemic stroke, as well as result in an overall reduction in mortality. And it seems older folks have the most to gain. Not only do they appear to benefit the most from a vascular health standpoint, research has linked moderate drinking in those over 65 with superior cognitive and memory function. It has also been Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Is It Possible To Drink Alcohol and Lose Weight? Drink alcohol and lose weight? Is it possible? If the calories, themselves, were the only factor; the alcohol wouldn’t be such a culprit in your weight loss efforts. After all, research has shown us that having the equivalent to one drink a day does offer certain cardiovascular benefits. Unfortunately, there’s more to it than that. First of all, the calories in alcohol are considered to be “empty” calories. Alcohol doesn’t provide the vitamins and minerals that you get in healthy foods and each gram of alcohol has about seven calories. Now, that’s before you consider any mixers you may be using. Adding fruit juice, soda or a pina colada mix to your ounce of rum can turn up the sabotage dial very quickly. Second, the alcohol slows down the fat burning process. The calories you consume when drinking alcohol are transformed into acetate and burned quickly, not stored in your body. So that means all of your dieting and exercising goes toward burning the alcohol calories first, rather than burning the fat that you’re trying to eliminate. If you don’t burn these acetate calories off, they’ll be stored in your body as fat along with the ones you’ve been trying to lose. For this reason, alcohol calories tend to be stored in the stomach and that’s why it’s sometimes referred to as the “straight-to-the-stomach” beverage. Third, and perhaps the most pervasive of all, is the simple fact that after a couple of drinks, your willpower will waiver. This makes it difficult to drink alcohol and lose weight effectively. It doesn’t take much to convince yourself that just one little slice of pizza would be okay after you’ve had a drink or two. The results that show up on the scale after a couple of incidences Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis?

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis?

Alcohol & Ketogenic Diet: Does It Affect Ketosis? It is hard to have a social life in Ketogenic diet lacking alcohol. You’ll find carbs in bar and astonish if you should go for them or avoid. Great start is to cut all the wine and bear on Keto diet but you can stick to hard liquor. It is made up of grains, natural sugars, fruits and potatoes, and in the fermentation process sugar turned into ethyl alcohol. Alcohol & Ketosis: Some say, alcohol is zero in calories, is it wise to adopt it or not, some are confused and need a guide, yet it is better to give up on it. The Ketogenic diet is low-carb, medium-protein and high-fat content but the fourth macronutrient is alcohol. If you love drinking and want to enjoy it on Keto, but unaware of its guidelines, let us tell you the best. When you consume alcohol, body cells accelerate and detect it as a toxic element. Liver process it and takes resources from other procedures and one of this method is ketone production, i.e. oxidation of fat. The fact is alcohol drinking slows down ketonic production, hence weight loss. Liver metabolism accelerates and ketonic production increases with the increase of alcohol consumption. If you are following a proper diet, it is not wise to take too much liquor because it affects ketosis. Some legitimate concerns that many ketoers have when it comes to consuming wine or alcohol are described here so that you may find the necessary things before approaching your next drink. Is Alcohol a Low-Carb Drink? The main molecule of alcohol (ethanol) is same for all types of drinks. Yeast works with sugar to convert it into alcohol and carbon dioxide, but sugar element and the mixture of drink determine your body consumption level of alcohol. You need a low-carb drink, to get that follow this suggested lis Continue reading >>

Keto Diet And Alcohol

Keto Diet And Alcohol

The ketogenic diet is a great way to lose weight, but it is also a lifestyle change that will stay with you for life. While you won’t be eating the extremely low levels of carbs you eat while you are losing weight once you reach your goals, you will need to restrict carbs in your diet permanently to keep those results. Of course, there are some things you have to give up during the strict, initial induction phase (which makes up the first ten to twelve days of your ketogenic diet plan) that you may not want to commit to giving up for the rest of your life. A key one of these, for many people, is alcohol. How does alcohol affect ketosis? Alcohol does have an impact on weight loss through a ketogenic diet, even when you drink low carb or carb free alcoholic beverages. This is because the body can use alcohol as a source of fuel. It isn’t stored as glycogen, like carbs, so once it is burned off you will go straight back into ketosis, however this does mean you are losing some fat burning time when you drink. How much this affects your weight loss varies between individuals. Some people find their weight loss stalls if they drink anything alcoholic, whereas others find they can drink responsible amounts of wine, hard liquor or a low carb beer (they do exist) and keep losing weight. Can I drink alcohol on a Ketogenic Diet? If you enjoy alcohol then as long as you have finished induction, you can try incorporating some low carb alcoholic drinks into your ketogenic diet, and monitor the results. Some people find they can drink vodka with no problems but their weight loss stalls if they drink wine. It is a case of experimenting and seeing what works for you, and then weighing up the pros and cons of having a drink when you want to. If it is a special occasion, you might acc Continue reading >>

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

As I decided to change my evil ways and give up bread and pasta, as well as all the other carbs that suck me in like a tractor beam, I knew my inner imp would not allow me to perform this feat which I haven’t been able to do for some time without *some* rascality along the way. Because of this I decided to go through carb withdrawal while drinking copious amounts of red wine – 1 to 2 bottles a night. I didn’t track calories but would usually go through the day without much more than the fat from my coffee and cream in the morning and the use of Atkins shakes as a creamer in my coffee at work. There was a can or two of sardines in there as well. At home, I would accompany the wine with something small. Maybe a piece of salmon the size of my hand with 2 tablespoons of butter. A chopped veggie salad with oil and vinegar. 10 breakfast sausages with ketchup. I did not count calories but aside from the alcohol (which is not a carb but does have 7 calories per gram, making it calorically dense) the amounts eaten were small and even the rare carby stuff like the ketchup and 2 mouthfuls of mac and cheese I had would not have put me out of a carb total for any given day well below 50 grams. This worked extremely well in carb withdrawal. I seemed to lose my craving for carbs by the 2nd day in. I had 2 people at work discussing their prodigious eating over the weekend after I told them I started a diet and I said: “Thank you for telling me all this right after I told you I started a diet.” “You’re welcome.” One said without missing a beat, and they continued. I work with a tough crowd and certainly there was no maliciousness intended – busting chops is a sport where I work – a way of blowing off steam by busting one another. It is not for the faint of heart nor Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

51 minutes Carl and Richard discuss alcohol, how it is metabolized, particularly by those eating a ketogenic diet. They discuss the carbohydrate content of typical drinks, and share a couple yummy keto-friendly cocktail recipes. Errata: Richard said he'd had 3 Bottles of Moët before the show - but it was actually 3 GLASSES of Moët. Also Richard said he didn't know of research substantiating Alcohol inhibiting gluconeogenesis and 5 minutes after we finished recording he found one from Hans Krebs (linked below). Update: May 11, 2016: Carl did an n=1 study on himself by following a 22/2 intermittent fasting pattern for 3 weeks. He ate only dinner, but had drinks with and after dinner. The result was a big plateau. No major weight loss. He then did a 2 day fast and started eating his one meal at lunch time (with no alcohol) saving the drinks for the evening. The results were positive. He started losing a pound a day. His hypothesis: When you drink alcohol your liver stops metabolizing food and focuses on the alcohol. Once all the calories are extracted from the alcohol the liver goes right back to metabolizing food, but now your caloric intake has increased and some of the calories from the food will not be used, and some of the fat will be stored in the fat cells. By giving the body time to process the food intake, you allow the liver to do it's job. More fat gets burned. By the time you introduce alcohol a bigger chunk of your lunch has already been metabolized. Listen Links Continue reading >>

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Intro Update May 2017: My current thoughts are not in line with this post. Read more here. It’s been little over a year since I embarked on my keto lifestyle. The nutritional approach is only a small (but important) part of my life optimization strategy. I’ve been through a lot of trial and error while trying to improve my macro partitioning. If it weren’t for the research and the books that I read throughout, I’d still be stuck in the mud. While being active on many FB groups and spamming whenever I post something new on my blog here :), I’ve seen that many people want to rush into getting results, want quick fixes, shortcuts, which gets them into nothing but trouble. So, let me try and give you my perspective on a few of the common mistakes that I see. Too much fat, too much food, poor nutrition I believe (please do not assume I generalize) eating high-fat does not mean consuming 3,000 – 10,000 kcals per day out of which 85% or more should come from fat. Doing so will lead to a possible nutrient deficient state. I tried eating 3,000+ kcals the first few days to weeks after starting the keto journey in Oct. 2013. I couldn’t do it for the long-term, especially because I was forcing myself to over-consume food. It did not feel normal or natural. I think that eating keto-friendly foods should not rely upon consuming entire sticks of butter or pouring all sorts of oils and butter into your coffee. That’s very energy rich, nutrient poor. Your body can thrive on a very-high-fat-very-low-carb diet with literally consumption of < 10g of carbohydrates per day. While releasing fats from the adipose tissue and hydrolyzing TAGs, your body can create most of its essential supply of vitamins and minerals (that’s what happens in long-term starvation too). But, for G Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Discuss this article! By Doreen EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT KETOSIS ... 1. What are ketones? 2. How will ketosis help me to lose weight? 3. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? 4. How do the ketone test strips work, and where do I get them? 5. I'm following Induction strictly; why won't my strips turn purple? 6. Will I lose weight faster if the strips show dark purple all the time? 7. Does caffeine affect ketosis? 8. Will drinking alcohol affect ketosis? What are ketones? Ketones are a normal and efficient source of fuel and energy for the human body. They are produced by the liver from fatty acids, which result from the breakdown of body fat in response to the absence of glucose/sugar. In a ketogenic diet, such as Atkins ... or diets used for treating epilepsy in children, the tiny amounts of glucose required for some select functions can be met by consuming a minimum amount of carbs - or can be manufactured in the liver from PROTEIN. When your body is producing ketones, and using them for fuel, this is called "ketosis". How will ketosis help me to lose weight? Most reducing diets restrict calorie intake, so you lose weight but some of that is fat and some of it is lean muscle tissue as well. Less muscle means slowed metabolism, which makes losing weight more difficult and gaining it back all too easy. Ketosis will help you to lose FAT. Being in ketosis means that your body's primary source of energy is fat (in the form of ketones). When you consume adequate protein as well, there's no need for the body to break down its muscle tissue. Ketosis also tends to accelerate fat loss --- once the liver converts fat to ketones, it can't be converted back to fat, and so is excreted. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? Being in ketosis by following a low carbohydrate diet is Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet?

Can I drink on a ketogenic diet? Should I drink on a ketogenic diet? What can I drink on the diet? How will alcohol affect my success? Here are the answers! Alcohol done the KetoKlarity way! The short answer is that you can drink alcohol whilst on the diet – BUT it is important to understand what you can drink, how much you can drink and when to drink. Not all alcohols are created equal – you probably know this from terrible hangovers you get with some lower quality drinks. However, when it comes to getting into ketosis and staying in ketosis you need to know one thing – how much sugar is there in my drink? The good news is that most liquors like vodka, whiskey, white rum, and gin are low in sugar and relatively low in calories. Beer on the other hand is full of calories so you probably can’t lift that craft beer to your lips! On average a shot of liquor is roughly equal to 1.5 oz and contains about 65 calories. However, it is important to remember that flavoured liquors often contain significantly more calories and carbs. So stick to the unflavoured original liquors! My personal favourite is a vodka martini with a slice of lemon and lime shaken over ice – yes I am a British secret agent! If you are looking for a mixer then you MUST avoid fruit juices. Low calorie and zero sugar options are available but if possible try to stick to just ice or cold water. Why? Well there is some evidence that even low calorie/zero sugar fizzy drinks can increase your chances of developing metabolic syndrome – more on this in another blog post! Beer is much harder to accommodate especially if you love craft beers and ales. However, a variety of low carb and low calorie beers are now available and these include (per 12oz bottle): Bud Select 55: 55 calories, 1.9g carbs MGD 64: Continue reading >>

The Smart Choice Of Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet

The Smart Choice Of Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet

The smart choice of alcohol on a ketogenic Diet January 19th, 2017 | in Keto Diet Blog , Nutrition Blog The smart choice of alcohol on a ketogenic Diet I always say No to my clients when they ask, Can I drink alcohol on a Ketogenic Diet? In order to get a MAXMIUM result, the best answer is to avoid alcohol and processed food all together, but I have to be realistic. Occasionally, we have social events such as birthday, anniversary, vacation, business meeting, etc. In this blog, I want to educate my clients how to have balance in their new lifestyle, Lets see, what are the best and the worst alcohol drinks on a Ketogenic Diet. Especially, if you are on a Ketogenic Diet, you MUST control your blood sugar levels and insulin levels. Dry wines contain 0.5 grams of sugar per glass, therefore, it is the best choice rather than fruity or sweet dessert wines. As you see above the list, drinks mix with juice and tonic is very bad choice. If you ever drink a cocktail, you should be aware of the glycemic index. In my opinion, beer is the worst choice if you want to get rid of your belly fat. Why would you drink beer and expect to lose belly fat? Beer is like a starch carbohydrate (sugar) liquid. Every time you drink a beer, you should think, you are drinking bread liquid. If beer is the ONLY alcohol that you love the most, please check below the list. It will help you to have a smart choice. Continue reading >>

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

You’re at the bar, you want a drink, but you’re not sure about the alcohol because you are following a ketogenic diet. (To learn about the ketogenic diet click here). It is hard to be the only person at a social event who isn’t drinking. So, what would be my best choices? In general, hard liquor is usually a better choice than beer and wine. Hard liquor has less total carbs and less total calories compared to beer or wine. Drinking alcohol will slow the rate in which you lose weight. The strange thing is that drinking alcohol helps your liver make more ketones. The liver takes the alcohol and makes triglycerides which make more ketones. This can cause you to get drunk faster. It is important to drink lots of water because being in ketosis can make a hangover worse. Here is a list of low-carb alcohols: Liquor – Whiskey, Tequila, Vodka and Gin. Beer – Michelob Ultra, Bud Select and Miller 64. Wine – Dry red or white wines. Here are some different brands and their carb contents: Whiskey – most contain 96 – 105 calories Johnnie Walker 0 carbs Chivas Regal 0 carbs Jack Daniels 0 carbs Tequila – most contain 96 – 104 calories Don Julio 0 carbs Patron 0 carbs Cazadores 0 carbs Vodka – most contain 96 – 105 calories Smirnoff 0 carbs Grey Goose 0 carbs Ciroc 0 carbs Gin – most contain 96 – 116 calories Seagram’s 0 carbs Bombay 0 carbs Tanqueray 0 carbs Red Wine – most contain 121 – 129 calories Cabernet 4 carbs Pinot Noir 3 carbs Merlot 4 carbs Beer – most contain 55 – 119 calories Budweiser Select 3 carbs Miller 64 2 carbs Michelob Ultra 3 carbs What is the best low carb mixer? Sparkling water – this is the best choice. In general, most of the mixers such as diet sodas may be low in carbs but they are horrible for your health. They also m Continue reading >>

Low Carb Drink Mixers

Low Carb Drink Mixers

Benefits of Low Carb Alcohol Moderate drinking improves sensitivity to insulin. Alcohol lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease. Drinking low carb liquor lowers the infection risk of ulcer-causing bacteria. Occasional drinking on low carb for social celebration relaxes mood. Benefits of Low Carb Liquor Unflavored liquor is zero carb – we love that part. Drinking on Atkins or low carb has more benefits. Low carb liquor packs a jolt of antioxidants. Research reports impressive antioxidant activity in bourbon whiskey, brandy and cognac. Whiskey aged in wood barrels has higher phenol levels and more ellagic acid (a free radical fighter) than red wine. Low Carb Liquor and Gluten Liquor is the result of a fermentation process, followed by distillation. This process makes the alcohol content higher. Sometimes liquor comes from grain fermentation. However, the distillation process gets rid of proteins and residues, making the liquor low carb and gluten-free. Low Carb Liquor There are many delicious low carb alcohol choices. Straight, unflavored liquor is rock-bottom low carb – as in zero carb. Carbs in Popular Liquor Serving size: 1.5 oz, unflavored, 80 proof Vodka, Gin, Whiskey, Scotch, Rum, Tequila, Brandy, Cognac 96 calories, 0 carbs Water, Diet Tonic Water or Diet Soda Mixers 0 carbs Martini Dry: 1.4 carbs (To lower carbs, order it extra dry.) Sweet: 4.5 carbs Carbs in drink mixers add up quickly. Use this low carb alcohol mixer list to count the carbs and make better choices before you pour that drink. Carbs in Mixers and Liqueurs Serving size: 1 oz Mixer – Net Carbs – Description Amaretto 17 (Almond-tasting Italian liqueur made from apricot pits.) Anisette 11 (Italian liqueur from anise seed, licorice flavored.) Baileys 5.5 (Irish blend of cream and whiskey.) Ca Continue reading >>

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