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Can I Drink Alcohol In Ketosis?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Keto Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Keto Diet?

If youre on the keto diet, youve probably wondered whether or not youre allowed to drink alcohol. Since its a popular aspect of St. Patricks Day, what better time to clear up the confusion?! First and foremost, drinking alcohol will not knock you out of ketosis, however it may delay your results. Your body is not equipped to store the energy present in alcohol, so it metabolizes the calories in the alcohol before any other energy sources, such as food. That means that while your body is metabolizing alcohol, it is NOT metabolizing fat. Another consideration is all of the empty calories in alcohol. On a diet as strict as the keto diet, you have to be hyper aware of everything you put in your body, and alcohol provides absolutely zero nutritional value. Depending on your drink of choice, you could be consuming an excess amount of sugar and carbs too an easy way to put on weight. If you do decide to give in to temptation, be responsible and drink in moderation. Your body will return to a ketogenic state once it has burned up all the alcohol. In conclusion, just because you can drink on a keto diet, doesnt mean you should. Alcohol is generally unhealthy and inhibits your judgment, making it more likely that youll make decisions that could compromise your diet and progress. But that doesnt mean you have to miss out on the St. Patricks Day festivities! Below weve included a keto-friendly, non-alcoholic Irish Coffee recipe. Its the flavor you love, without the goal-jeopardizing alcohol. Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

A recent article in the International Journal of Obesity should give low-carbers cause for a little alarm. Here is what happened to a man in Sweden on a low-carb diet: We report a case of a 59-year-old man, body mass index 26.6 kg/m2, who began a weight reduction program, partly because of knee pains but also because he was a glider pilot where weight is important. He used a Swedish textbook on obesity treatment written by S Rössner together with the commonly used Swedish VLCD [very low calorie diet] Nutrilett (Cederroths, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 packets/day for 3 weeks, which is an approved standard regimen. This treatment resulted in a weight loss of 7 kg. During dieting, the man discovered that an alcohol ignition interlock device, installed in an official company car, indicated that he had consumed alcohol and the vehicle failed to start. This was confusing because the man was a life-long teetotaller and was therefore both surprised and upset by the result. As he had been supervising private aviation he had access to a second breath-alcohol analyzer, which indicated a simultaneous BAC ranging from 0.01 to 0.02 g/100 ml. A VLCD diet (very-low-calorie diet, a protein-sparing modified fast) contains mainly protein along with a small amount of carbohydrate and very few calories, usually fewer than 1000 per day. Just about anyone going on one of these diets will soon be in producing ketone bodies at a pretty high rate. But the same goes for a more traditional low-carb diet as well. If carbs are kept at a low level, ketosis will occur. In fact, it’s desired. Ketone bodies are water-soluble products of fat metabolism. The body has three ways of dealing with ketones: it can burn them for energy (which it does with great success), it can release them in the urine (which is Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

A very common question we get is, am I okay to consume alcohol on a ketogenic diet? While drinking the occasional low carb beer is okay, you’ll be better off consuming a dry red wine. A recent study found that individuals following a ketogenic diet still experienced the positive health changes of being in ketosis, even while incorporating a dry red wine into their diet. Study Overview – This study allowed ketogenic dieters to consume red wine for 12 weeks, and subjects still demonstrated: Reduced blood pressure Reduced LDL cholesterol Increased HDL cholesterol Lower total cholesterol Lower blood glucose Key Points – Dry wine is more keto friendly since it is lower in sugar. Select dry red wines, such as; Malbec, Merlot, or Cabernet Sauvignon. Wine contains Resveratrol, which can promote fat burning. Additional Benefits of Red Wine – Improves heart health Improves cholesterol Reduces Inflammation Improves symptoms of diabetes Lowers risk of neurodegenerative disease Remember, it’s okay to drink alcohol on a ketogenic diet, but keep moderation in mind so that you don’t throw your body out of ketosis. Test your ketone levels after drinking alcohol to see how many glasses it takes to consume to affect your blood ketone levels. NOTE: Consider supplementing your diet with an exogenous ketone such as, KETO//OS, before and after consuming alcohol to keep the body in therapeutic levels of ketosis. Continue reading >>

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol: What to drink; When to drink, How to drink, And how it affects ketosis. You can drink alcohol in moderation on a Ketogenic Diet as long as you don't have a medical condition that would prohibit you from doing so. Alcoholic drinks DO have calories, and they come from alcohol (at 7 kcals per gram) and from carbs (at 4 kcals per gram). Your body does not have the ability to store the calories from alcohol itself, but it will store the energy from the food ingested along with it. Your body WILL metabolize alcohol before any other source of energy. So while you are metabolizing calories from alcohol, you are NOT metabolizing those from fat. To stay on track with your dietary goals, find out the caloric content of your drink, divide it by 9, then deduct this from your allowed fat grams of the day. Anecdotally, ketosis may lower your alcohol tolerance (1) so you could get drunk faster, there are some theories about the whys (2) but nothing conclusive. Alcohol also dehydrates you, so drink a glass of water along with each alcoholic beverage you consume. Not all alcohol is the same: alcohol is the product of sugar fermented by yeast. Depending on the type of sugar used, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages with different alcohol and carb content. Straight Liquors are basically zero carb, so mix any of them with water, club soda, or diet sodas to keep them carb free. Pro-Tip: if you use Tonic, make sure it is a sugar free version so it does not contain sugar and carbs! Other liquors such as Amaretto, Jägermeister, Grand Marnier, Curacao, Sweet Vermouth, Limoncello, etc. (basically anything with a hint of sweet) usually contain sugars, so you better avoid them entirely. Although wine is made from grapes and logic dictates it should be hig Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

When on a ketogenic diet or other low carb diets there are many people asking if it is possible to combine ketosis and Alcohol. The simple answer is yes, you can stay in ketosis even though you drink alcohol but you need to be careful what kind of alcohol you drink. You can also not drink alcohol on a regular basis since it will impact your weight loss even though it does not take you out of ketosis. The main reason that alcohol will impact your ketosis is that the body is not able to store the alcohol that you consume. Instead it will start to metabolize the calories in the alcohol first before the body uses any other energy sources. This means that you will not use fat as your main energy source until the alcohol in the body has been used up. Still does not impact ketosis, but your weight loss results. Also when drinking alcohol on ketosis there are some kinds of alcohol that are better than others. Your first choice should be vodka, whiskey or other types of strong alcohol. They contain no or very little carbohydrates. If you do not like to drink strong alcohol then some dry wine is also quite okay. It contains some more carbohydrates but still okay now and then. Beer and other kinds of alcohol you should stay away from if you want to focus on your diet. To help you to know how many calories there are in different types of alcohol you can use this keto alcohol cheat sheet from dietketo.com Red Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Merlot: 3.7g carbohydrates and 120 calories Pinot Noir: 3.4g carbohydrates and 121 calories Cabernet: 3.8g carbohydrates and 120 calories White Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Chardonnay: 3.7g carbohydrates and 118 calories Riesling: 5.5g carbohydrates and 118 calories Sparkling whites: 1.5g carbohydrates and 96 calories Beer Based on 12oz or 3.5dL. Mi Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Can I Drink Alcohol And Lose Weight?

Is It Possible To Drink Alcohol and Lose Weight? Drink alcohol and lose weight? Is it possible? If the calories, themselves, were the only factor; the alcohol wouldn’t be such a culprit in your weight loss efforts. After all, research has shown us that having the equivalent to one drink a day does offer certain cardiovascular benefits. Unfortunately, there’s more to it than that. First of all, the calories in alcohol are considered to be “empty” calories. Alcohol doesn’t provide the vitamins and minerals that you get in healthy foods and each gram of alcohol has about seven calories. Now, that’s before you consider any mixers you may be using. Adding fruit juice, soda or a pina colada mix to your ounce of rum can turn up the sabotage dial very quickly. Second, the alcohol slows down the fat burning process. The calories you consume when drinking alcohol are transformed into acetate and burned quickly, not stored in your body. So that means all of your dieting and exercising goes toward burning the alcohol calories first, rather than burning the fat that you’re trying to eliminate. If you don’t burn these acetate calories off, they’ll be stored in your body as fat along with the ones you’ve been trying to lose. For this reason, alcohol calories tend to be stored in the stomach and that’s why it’s sometimes referred to as the “straight-to-the-stomach” beverage. Third, and perhaps the most pervasive of all, is the simple fact that after a couple of drinks, your willpower will waiver. This makes it difficult to drink alcohol and lose weight effectively. It doesn’t take much to convince yourself that just one little slice of pizza would be okay after you’ve had a drink or two. The results that show up on the scale after a couple of incidences Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

As the festive party season fast approaches, a common question raised by my clients is ‘Am I able to have an alcoholic drink whilst on the ketogenic diet?’ So I thought I’d put together all of my thoughts around ketosis and alcohol and share it with the rest of my followers. For starters, let take a look at what happens to our body when we consume alcohol. When we drink alcohol, it gets absorbed very quickly into our bloodstream via our stomach and small intestine. Alcohol is toxic and as a result, the body tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible by breaking it down into non toxic substances, carbon dioxide and water. This detoxification process takes place in the liver. The liver is unable to process all of the alcohol in the bloodstream at once, so the body has other ways of getting rid of it, via urine, sweat and even the lungs. Ketosis and alcohol: the effect on weight loss Alcohol is best avoided on a keto diet because it impacts insulin levels and the whole point of eating a ketogenic diet is to control insulin by lowering blood sugar levels enough to allow use fat for fuel (preferably your own body fat if you’re trying to lean down). Insulin is the hormone that prevents this from happening and essentially locks body fat in, preventing it from being an accessible fuel source. When alcohol is consumed, there’s typically an initial rise in blood sugars. The amount to which is rises depends on how much you’ve drank. This is because the body is trying to rid itself of the toxic alcohol, rather than controlling its blood sugar levels. As the body detoxifies, insulin then spikes to allow blood sugar levels to be controlled. Ketone levels also drop. This locks the body fat in and halts the fat burning process! This is exactly the opposite of what we wan Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, you train your body to begin using fats for energy rather than carbohydrates. This is also known as a state of ketosis which is indicated by the production of a by-product called ketones. What happens to ketone levels when you introduce alcohol into the mix? Interestingly enough, our bodies treat alcohol like any carbohydrate, in that it is sent to the front of the line to be used as energy. While your body burns calories from the alcohol you consumed, ketosis will be "paused." You won't get kicked out and have to reinitiate it, but ketone production will momentarily cease while your body burns the alcohol. Effects of Drinking and Caution One of the best features of ketogenic dieting is that you can easily drink alcohol in moderation without setting your diet goals back. There are a few things you should remember when drinking alcohol while in ketosis: Ketogenic dieters experience notoriously bad hangovers. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water in between drinks. While drinking liquor won't ruin your diet, all things in moderation. Excess carbohydrates and calories will still slow down your weight loss, so make sure you keep drinking to a minimum when possible. Don't forget to consider mixers when calculating your carb counts. Use diet sodas and artificially sweetened juices instead of their full-carbohydrate counterparts. Don't let alcohol affect your willpower! The intoxicating effects may tempt you to stray from your diet, but don't eat those french fries! Try to have some low carb snacks lined up that you can resort to when you get hungry. Below are a few of the most popular types of alcohol, along with their calorie and carbohydrate counts. Have fun and be safe! Calories and Carbohydrates in Liquor (1 oz.) Alcohol Name Calories (kcal) Carbo Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol

Ketosis And Alcohol

When it comes to the ketogenic lifestyle, there are lots of confusing and conflicting opinions floating around, and they can lead to all kinds of mistakes. One of those confusing areas is how alcohol fits into a ketogenic lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have a pretty good understanding and some tools to use to make informed decisions along the way. First off, not all alcoholic beverages are the same. Alcohol is the same across the board; it’s a macronutrient with seven calories per gram, so that’s the starting point. It’s a byproduct of fermentation. Essentially, a sugar compound is acted upon by yeast and the yeast produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. Depending on the type of sugar compound, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages. Hard liquor, or spirits, takes the process a little further and adds distillation. That is, essentially, the process of “boiling off” the alcohol and then re-condensing (as it cools) it into more a more concentrated form. When you something marketed as “Distilled 9 times”, that just means they went through the boiling and condensing process nine times. Okay, so that’s where alcohol comes from, but that’s not all there is to it. Like said, the type of sugar compound determines the type of alcohol. For example, beer is made with, basically four ingredients. Barley, hops, water, and yeast. Barley is the primary ingredient, it’s where the sugar (maltose) comes from for the yeast. It’s also very similar to wheat. It’s a very bad carb. And it’s the reason that some people call beer “liquid bread”. It is far too rich in carbohydrates, not just the sugars, but the other “glutenous carbs”. So it’s a definite no for Ketovangelists. Beer does not fit into a ketogenic lifestyle. (Sidenote: A Continue reading >>

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Hey all. I was bumping around the paleo inter-webs and came across this little nugget on ketosis: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC! Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal. Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol! - Link Although I'm philosophically ketosis-agnostic, I do best on a lowish carb diet and most likely find myself in ketosis from time-to-time. I'm wondering what you think of this warning. Is the science sound? Should ketotic boozers eat a sweet potato before hitting the firewater this xmas? Continue reading >>

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