diabetestalk.net

Can Glucose Be Turned Into Fat?

Share on facebook

Saturated fats, unsaturated fats, and trans fats Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82q... Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_...

Do Our Bodies Convert All Food (fats, Carbs And Proteins) To Glucose, Or In Other Words, Do Our Cells Burn Anything Other Than Glucose?

Answered May 12, 2015 Author has 219 answers and 550.2k answer views Our body doesn't convert all the carbs, proteins and fat we eat to glucose! Carbohydrates: Only those carbohydrates which are digestible by our gut are used, remaining else (cellulose for that matter) remains in the gut, absorbs water and aids in proper digestion; the so called roughage. Yeah, the digested ones which may either give glucose, fructose or galactose as the final product, are all converted to glucose. Proteins: All amino acids obtained from the protein digestion are not converted to glucose, only a few of them are, remaining is converted to ketone bodies (another energy suppplier as glucose). Fats: Fats (neutral fats or triglycerides) are broken down into fatty acids and glycerol. From this, only glycerol and odd chain fatty acid (cf. even chain fatty acid) can produce glucose. So, what's with this compulsion of glucose to be present in the blood in the right quantity always? "Lest the brain will be starved, for it needs glucose from blood", you would have heard. Partly true because brain can live by utilizing ketone bodies as well. But for an optimal neurotransmitter (chemical signals aiding communi Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Mrs_Elliston

    Does the intake of caffeine during a fast have a negative impact on autophagy?

  2. ketohorse

    Coffee - not necessarily caffeine - boosts metabolism and inhibits the mTOR pathway, which should help - or at least not hurt - autophagy.

  3. Bahrutile

    what about fat that may be in the coffee?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video I discuss what is fructose, fructose metabolism, and fructose in sugar. Transcript (partial) Fructose is a monosaccharide, which are the most basic units of carbs. Pure, dry fructose is very sweet, white, and odorless. It is found in honey, fruits, vegetables, sugar cane, and sugar beets. Usually fructose is separated from glucose in a sucrose molecule. It can then be added as a stand alone ingredient. Because pure fructose is sweeter than sugar, less of it can be used to achieve the same level of sweetness, which translates to lower calorie foods. 1 teaspoon of Pure dry fructose has 15 calories, which equates to 4.2g of carbs. How does the body use fructose? Most of the cells in our body cant process fructose, so,it is almost completely metabolized in the liver through a process called fructolysis. Essentially the liver converts fructose to energy, but, this energy cant leave because of its molecular makeup. The liver does burn off some of this energy . If there is any excess fructose after the energy conversion, the liver stores it as glycogen, which can be broken down into glucose and sent to other cells for use. But the liver can only store so much glycogen, once it is fully stocked in glycogen, the extra fructose is used to create triglycerides, which can be moved outside the liver for long term storage as fat. So, based on this, fruits must be bad? Actually, No, not at all. Fruits are loaded with water, fiber, and other nutrients, so, they take a while to eat and digest so, their fructose hits the liver slowly. The amount of fructose contained in fruit is much smaller than the added sugar in a soft drink for instance. Bottom linefructose is not unhealthy, depending on the source it came from. When that source is a natural food, like fruits and vegetables great, when that source is in the form of added sugar, not so great.

Does Fructose Make You Fatter?

High-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener used in many processed foods ranging from sodas to baked goods. While the ingredient is cheaper and sweeter than regular sugar, new research suggests that it can also make you fatter. In a small study, Texas researchers showed that the body converts fructose to body fat with “surprising speed,” said Elizabeth Parks, associate professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, in a press release. The study, which appears in The Journal of Nutrition, shows how glucose and fructose, which are forms of sugar, are metabolized differently. In humans, triglycerides, which are a type of fat in the blood, are mostly formed in the liver. Dr. Parks said the liver acts like “a traffic cop” who coordinates how the body uses dietary sugars. When the liver encounters glucose, it decides whether the body needs to store it, burn it for energy or turn it into triglycerides. But when fructose enters the body, it bypasses the process and ends up being quickly converted to body fat. “It’s basically sneaking into the rock concert through the fence,” Dr. Parks said. “It’s a less-controlled movement of Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. kiamlaluno

    Lipolysis and ketosis both end in ‑sis.
    Does that suffix have the same meaning in both the words?

  2. ShreevatsaR

    No. The suffix in lipolysis is -lysis, while the suffix in ketosis is -osis.
    -lysis is a 'scientific/medical suffix meaning "loosening, dissolving, dissolution," from Gk. lysis'.
    The word lipolysis means the breakdown of lipids.
    The word ketosis comes from 'keto- combining form of ketone, + -osis', where -osis is a 'suffix expressing state or condition, in medical terminology denoting "a state of disease," from L. -osis, from Gk. -osis'. Ketosis is a disease 'characterised by elevated levels of ketone bodies in the blood'.
    The connection between the two is that the process of lipolysis produces ketones, an excess of which is called ketosis, but this is not an etymological connection.

  3. sumelic

    The final -sis in lipolysis and ketosis comes from the Greek suffix -σις -sis, which had a very general meaning: it was used to form nouns (kind of like the Latin ending -tion). Often, these nouns are derived from Greek verbs, as in λύσις lysis "loosening" from the verb λύω lyō "unbind, unfasten." In some words, such as λέξις lexis, this ending is disguised since the consonant combination /ks/ is written as the single letter ξ or x. This same general meaning has basically carried over into the English: most words ending in sis are nouns. Usually related adjectives end in -tic, but there are exceptions, such as basic and dyslexic (which is much more common than dyslectic).
    The English suffix -osis, according to Wiktionary, is
    From Ancient Greek -ωσις ‎(-ōsis, “state, abnormal condition, or action”), from -όω ‎(-óō) stem verbs + -σις ‎(-sis).
    In ketosis, this suffix is used on the "keto" root of ketone and the like.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video I discuss the what are carbohydrates and the types of carbohydrates. The pros and cons to each type, and the best carbs to eat. Transcript Types of carbs So, what are the different types of carbohydrates? The answer to this question depends on who you ask. Some common classifications would be healthy and unhealthy, good and bad, slow and fast. In this video I am going to classify them as simple, complex and fibrous. Before we get into those classifications, we need to look at molecules. I know, fun stuff, but it will help you understand better. A monosaccharide is a single molecule, such as fructose, which is found in fruit. A disaccharide consists of 2 monosaccharide molecules, such as sucrose or table sugar. And a polysaccharide consists of many monosaccharide molecules, such as in whole grain pasta. Now that we have that out of the way, lets look at simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made up of mono and disaccharides, 1 or 2 molecules. Some foods include, fruits, milk, and foods with high amounts of added sugars. Typically simple carbohydrates are easily absorbed into the bloodstream because of their simple molecular structure. However, when you obtain simple carbohydrates from whole foods, they are usually combined with vitamins, minerals and fiber, which slows down the digestive process. Now, lets look at complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are composed of polysaccharides, so, because of their more complex molecular structure, they can take longer for the body to break down and digest, like whole grains and vegetables. However, some complex carbohydrate foods have been processed, which strips them of some of their natural, high fiber content as well as vitamins and minerals, so they are digested faster and more easily. So, with both simple and complex carbohydrates I have mentioned fast and slow digestion. Why is that important? 3 reasons, #1 is it is going to make you feel fuller longer, rapid digestion means hunger returns quicker which leads to more consumption. #2, typically slower digested foods cause lower blood level spikes, and #3, slower, longer digestion means the body is using more energy over a longer period of time to break down the food, which is an increase or boost in metabolism. Next up is fiber. Fiber is parts of plants that cant be digested. I have a separate video that looks deeper into fiber that I will link in the little I in the upper right-hand corner of your screen. Bottom line. So, the question is what type of carbohydrates should you eat. That is actually very easy to answer. All 3 types. Don’t focus on the types, instead, focus on Carbohydrates that have been minimally processed, like whole grain pasta, and whole wheat bread, also Fruits and vegetables that contain fiber, vitamins and minerals. And of course anything from dairy queen. Ah, just joking with ya folks. Seriously though, minimize the consumption of the processed foods, if you can eliminated them great, if not, its about moderation. Its ok to eat the foods you love, you just have to do it in moderation. Other sources... http://www.builtlean.com/2012/05/17/c... http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healt... http://www.livestrong.com/article/133...

Converting Carbohydrates To Triglycerides

Consumers are inundated with diet solutions on a daily basis. High protein, low fat, non-impact carbohydrates, and other marketing “adjectives” are abundant within food manufacturing advertising. Of all the food descriptors, the most common ones individuals look for are “fat free” or “low fat”. Food and snack companies have found the low fat food market to be financially lucrative. The tie between fat intake, weight gain, and health risks has been well documented. The dietary guidelines suggest to keep fat intake to no more than 30% of the total diet and to consume foods low in saturated and trans fatty acids. But, this does not mean that we can consume as much fat free food as we want: “Fat free does not mean calorie free.” In many cases the foods that are low in fat have a large amount of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate intake, like any nutrient, can lead to adverse affects when over consumed. Carbohydrates are a necessary macronutrient, vital for maintenance of the nervous system and energy for physical activity. However, if consumed in amounts greater than 55% to 65% of total caloric intake as recommended by the American Heart Association can cause an increase in he Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. nboylie

    I have searched rexall and shoppers drug mart and I can't seem to find them?

  2. quality_time

    I get mine at shoppers. I ask for them from the pharmacist as they keep them behind the counter. I've also gotten them from the pharmacy at the grocery store - same deal behind the counter. If they don't have them behind the counter it's on order. Typically with the diabetic stuff.

  3. rolodex9

    yep, Shoppers has them behind the pharmacists counter. In regards to how expensive they are, I combat that by cutting mine in half. They're still readable and instead of 50 you get 100 strips

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Can The Body Turn Fat Into Glucose?

    How the Body Uses Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats The human body is remarkably adept at making do with whatever type of food is available. Our ability to survive on a variety of diets has been a vital adaptation for a species that evolved under conditions where food sources were scarce and unpredictable. Imagine if you had to depend on successfully hunting a woolly mammoth or stumbling upon a berry bush for sustenance! Today, calories are most ...

    ketosis Jan 22, 2019
  • Can Fat Be Broken Down Into Glucose

    Consumers are inundated with diet solutions on a daily basis. High protein, low fat, non-impact carbohydrates, and other marketing “adjectives” are abundant within food manufacturing advertising. Of all the food descriptors, the most common ones individuals look for are “fat free” or “low fat”. Food and snack companies have found the low fat food market to be financially lucrative. The tie between fat intake, weight gain, and health r ...

    ketosis Jan 22, 2019
  • How Is Glucose Turned Into A Usable Form Of Energy Called Atp?

    How is ATP produced in cells; what is the difference between the energy-producing process in animal cells and plant cells? How much ATP is produced? You have asked a classic question in biology, and of course, a very important one. How living things produce usable energy is important not only from the perspective of understanding life, but it could also help us to design more efficient energy harvesting and producing products - if we could "mimi ...

    blood sugar May 1, 2018
  • How Is Glucose Turned Into Glycogen?

    Biosynthesis of Glycogen: The goal of glycolysis, glycogenolysis, and the citric acid cycle is to conserve energy as ATP from the catabolism of carbohydrates. If the cells have sufficient supplies of ATP, then these pathways and cycles are inhibited. Under these conditions of excess ATP, the liver will attempt to convert a variety of excess molecules into glucose and/or glycogen. Glycogenesis: Glycogenesis is the formation of glycogen from glucos ...

    blood sugar May 1, 2018
  • Can Glucose Be Turned Into Fat?

    Answered May 12, 2015 Author has 219 answers and 550.2k answer views Our body doesn't convert all the carbs, proteins and fat we eat to glucose! Carbohydrates: Only those carbohydrates which are digestible by our gut are used, remaining else (cellulose for that matter) remains in the gut, absorbs water and aids in proper digestion; the so called roughage. Yeah, the digested ones which may either give glucose, fructose or galactose as the final p ...

    ketosis Apr 26, 2018
  • How Is Starch Turned Into Glucose?

    On a low-carb diet, the main goal is to avoid raising blood glucose too much. This is why we avoid foods which are high in sugars and starches. But it turns out that not all starches are created equal. Some starches are digested very quicklyand cause a rapid and large rise in blood sugar. Others are digested more slowly, causing blood glucose to rise less and over a longer period of time. Some starch, called resistant starch , is not digested in ...

    insulin May 6, 2018

More in ketosis